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Old 04-20-2013, 03:51 AM
 
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Do you find people in suburbs have hobbies , interest ,food , culture , lifestyle and the way they dress so on different than the city.I find the city is more trendy and fashion oriented where the suburb is more individualism.

I lived in suburb my whole life and I never would live in the city even if people paid me million dollars !! I hate Apartments , condos with passion and even townhouses and row-houses is not my idea of living .

I like the suburb the privacy the lack of foot traffic and more spread out and being spoiled living in house and big SUV .Yes suburb people like big cars /SUV where city people walk or take a bus .


If some one said you cannot live in the suburb you have choose a city or country I would pick the country living than.

ON A SIDE NOTE the built patterns of the 20's , 30's and 40's , 50's in the US ( very much so southwest part of the US ) have more of a city suburb combo feel .Put it simple English a suburb that looks and feels more urban , more walkable and urban feel but preserving living in house and walking /car centric hybrid . Where the built patterns of the late 20 century more car centric.

Also note the cities and suburbs look and feel very different in Europe than the US.
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Old 04-20-2013, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
6,372 posts, read 5,994,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweat209 View Post
Do you find people in suburbs have hobbies , interest ,food , culture , lifestyle and the way they dress so on different than the city.I find the city is more trendy and fashion oriented where the suburb is more individualism.

I lived in suburb my whole life and I never would live in the city even if people paid me million dollars !! I hate Apartments , condos with passion and even townhouses and row-houses is not my idea of living .

I like the suburb the privacy the lack of foot traffic and more spread out and being spoiled living in house and big SUV .Yes suburb people like big cars /SUV where city people walk or take a bus .


If some one said you cannot live in the suburb you have choose a city or country I would pick the country living than.

ON A SIDE NOTE the built patterns of the 20's , 30's and 40's , 50's in the US ( very much so southwest part of the US ) have more of a city suburb combo feel .Put it simple English a suburb that looks and feels more urban , more walkable and urban feel but preserving living in house and walking /car centric hybrid . Where the built patterns of the late 20 century more car centric.

Also note the cities and suburbs look and feel very different in Europe than the US.
So you would pick rural living, where individualism is on an entirely different level than suburbia, as you need to grow your own food, and jobs are sparse (if existent at all), which requires one to sustain themselves far more than suburbia, where individualism is conspicuous, as best, from city living?



Rural living is not contingent on white collar jobs like suburbia. Rural lifestyle is its own job. You might be referring to the exurbs, where people drive to suburbia for amenities like groceries, entertainment, etc. But that isn't rural living. Rural living, the city limits are 50 miles away and the city core is 75 miles away. I doubt that is the type of living you are referring to, when you mention "rural living".

While I would prefer the suburbs to rural living, I would live in the city, if given the choice you mention. A lot of nice neighborhoods in the city have the look and feel of suburbia, particularly in the Midwest, or the Southeast. Rural living is hard, it is its own reward, and it is a philosophy I am not cut out for. Suburban living, I can walk five miles to the grocery store in one direction and two miles to a strip mall in the other direction; it isn't that hard, and most cases, it is safe and I don't have to look over my back like I do in the city.
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Old 04-20-2013, 11:16 AM
 
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Of course they do, though many if not most suburbs have the housing styles detested by the OP. The culture of having a great lawn, barbecuing, worries about flooded basements, are all part of it. As is boasting about the schools and the children's activities. Some suburbs are blessed with commuter rail service, and those who use it rave about the service but complain about the parking.
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Old 04-20-2013, 11:17 AM
 
Location: North by Northwest
7,442 posts, read 9,875,598 times
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Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
So you would pick rural living, where individualism is on an entirely different level than suburbia, as you need to grow your own food, and jobs are sparse (if existent at all), which requires one to sustain themselves far more than suburbia, where individualism is conspicuous, as best, from city living?

"Hip," "sustainable," "conscientious" conformity is really no different from "passť," "auto-centric," "self-absorbed" conformity. I hate grandstanders of all kinds.

I personally like city neighborhoods and charming, inner ring suburbs, but different strokes, 'n at. While I believd long-term planning should focus on attracting people closer to the urban core, we're entitled to make choices in life, and I don't blame a middle class family of four for choosing a community where they can actually afford living space, fresh air, and good public schools.
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Old 04-20-2013, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
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Originally Posted by HeavenWood View Post
"Hip," "sustainable," "conscientious" conformity is really no different from "passť," "auto-centric," "self-absorbed" conformity.

I personally like city neighborhoods and charming, inner ring suburbs, but different strokes, 'n at. While I believd long-term planning should focus on attracting people closer to the urban core, we're entitled to make choices in life, and I don't blame a middle class family of four for choosing a community where they can actually afford living space, fresh air, and good public schools.
True. But I was addressing the generalizations the OP was making about rural America. It sounds as if the OP has never lived in a rural setting, or was working off of other people's experiences. If that isn't the case I stand corrected, but rural life isn't as glamorous as suburbanites often make it to be, nor the digression city people often make it out to be. The truth is somewhere in the middle.
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Old 04-20-2013, 11:24 AM
 
Location: North by Northwest
7,442 posts, read 9,875,598 times
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Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
True. But I was addressing the generalizations the OP was making about rural America. It sounds as if the OP has never lived in a rural setting, or was working off of other people's experiences. If that isn't the case I stand corrected, but rural life isn't as glamorous as suburbanites often make it to be, nor the digression city people often make it out to be. The truth is somewhere in the middle.
I'm not familiar with rural America, so I wouldn't venture to say what it "is" or "is not" like. I was simply commenting on your comments vis-a-vis "the suburbs." I'd imagine though that just like there's more than one type of "city" and "suburb," rural communities too come in all shapes and sizes.
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Old 04-20-2013, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
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Originally Posted by HeavenWood View Post
I'm not familiar with rural America, so I wouldn't venture to say what it "is" or "is not" like. I was simply commenting on your comments vis-a-vis "the suburbs." I'd imagine though that just like there's more than one type of "city" and "suburb," rural communities too come in all shapes and sizes.
Well there are. I don't want to come across as having generalized anything, city, rural, or suburban. I was just addressing, the "well the suburbs are like this so the country must be like that" type of argument. First thing that came across my mind was "well you've honestly never lived in the country, because it is nothing like that".

Keeping in mind that my experiences in West Virginia may be totally different from a rural dwellers experiences in say, Kentucky or Ohio, or even Upstate New York. The OP seems to desire a rural lifestyle that isn't agriculturally based, but one made possible through telecommuting. Nothing wrong with that, but that isn't the reality for everyone in the country.

Short answer; while there is nothing wrong from someone from the city or suburbs making an active choice to live in a rural area, either through telecommuting, or bringing their own money into that situation (because it is difficult to make money out there through the same means). The fantasy is often at odds with the reality for those in rural areas that aren't educated, or unable to compete with the government or large corporations with respect to large scale industrial farming on a smaller, family owned farm.
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Old 04-20-2013, 01:50 PM
 
1,027 posts, read 1,648,215 times
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Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
So you would pick rural living, where individualism is on an entirely different level than suburbia, as you need to grow your own food, and jobs are sparse (if existent at all), which requires one to sustain themselves far more than suburbia, where individualism is conspicuous, as best, from city living?



Rural living is not contingent on white collar jobs like suburbia. Rural lifestyle is its own job. You might be referring to the exurbs, where people drive to suburbia for amenities like groceries, entertainment, etc. But that isn't rural living. Rural living, the city limits are 50 miles away and the city core is 75 miles away. I doubt that is the type of living you are referring to, when you mention "rural living".

While I would prefer the suburbs to rural living, I would live in the city, if given the choice you mention. A lot of nice neighborhoods in the city have the look and feel of suburbia, particularly in the Midwest, or the Southeast. Rural living is hard, it is its own reward, and it is a philosophy I am not cut out for. Suburban living, I can walk five miles to the grocery store in one direction and two miles to a strip mall in the other direction; it isn't that hard, and most cases, it is safe and I don't have to look over my back like I do in the city.

I know some people who live in the country and are really happy some drive to the city only to see the doctor or do big shopping but most drive to town to go shopping .

Has for jobs you are right it more limited that is trade off if the city is more than hour drive or more from where you live.The more country living away from city the cheaper it is and more property you get.

Some people I know live really remote living a hour drive to town and like 5 hours to closes city but live on lake and really wooden.

One thing city folks must learn when moving to country you spend more time out doors if you are NOT into out doors swimming , boating , hiking , ,riding ATV ,hunting , fishing and remote living in woods than you should stay away from country living.

But yes there is trade off with jobs living in the country or town.
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Old 04-20-2013, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
6,372 posts, read 5,994,477 times
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Originally Posted by sweat209 View Post
I know some people who live in the country and are really happy some drive to the city only to see the doctor or do big shopping but most drive to town to go shopping .

Has for jobs you are right it more limited that is trade off if the city is more than hour drive or more from where you live.The more country living away from city the cheaper it is and more property you get.

Some people I know live really remote living a hour drive to town and like 5 hours to closes city but live on lake and really wooden.

One thing city folks must learn when moving to country you spend more time out doors if you are NOT into out doors swimming , boating , hiking , ,riding ATV ,hunting , fishing and remote living in woods than you should stay away from country living.

But yes there is trade off with jobs living in the country or town.
You do get more property and prices are cheaper in the country. But they are often cheaper for a reason. If that is the lifestyle for you by all means give it a shot. I recommend everyone do it, at least once, so they aren't so ignorant/prejudiced about the rural lifestyle. Try it for a period of time and write back and tell us how you like it.
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Old 04-20-2013, 06:25 PM
 
1,027 posts, read 1,648,215 times
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Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
You do get more property and prices are cheaper in the country. But they are often cheaper for a reason. If that is the lifestyle for you by all means give it a shot. I recommend everyone do it, at least once, so they aren't so ignorant/prejudiced about the rural lifestyle. Try it for a period of time and write back and tell us how you like it.
Lot cheaper you can get house for well under $50,00 where big city like New York or LA living in suburb over hour away from city cost well over $600,000 to $1,000,000.

If you wont to spend $2,000 month for one room Apartment by all means go for it but this is not American living if that case than move to Asia where they live in apartment and on top of one other.

The American lifestyle is car and house but that may change in the future like it is having inpect on some cities now in the US .

And yes there trade of living in town , country even small city under $400,000 people when comes to jobs and not say shopping.You may have to drive hour or more to town for shopping and drive to big city three times year or more to see doctor and do big shopping.

If one is into going to nightclubs ,bars and restaurants and city entertainment than yes town , country and even suburbs are not for those types of people.
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