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Old 04-30-2013, 03:30 PM
 
Location: The City
22,341 posts, read 32,192,195 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I'm still not clear on what you mean by "intensity of use."
I would imagine ths would have to be some form of job, residential, transit, retail, restaurant, event, cultural activity density.

Maybe a end destination use metric, but not sure if such a thing exists

If you look at factors

Jobs per sq mile
Residents per sq mile
Restaurants per sq mile
Retail sq footage per square mile
Transit (car, bus, train etc>) destination flow per sq mile (though this may be accounted for by the other categories)
Event Attendance per sq mile (Maybe Museum, cultural, festival etc.)


Not sure but if you normalized these measure somehow and factored them together in theory you could create a use intesnsity metric
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Old 04-30-2013, 04:28 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,174 posts, read 23,705,057 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I'm still not clear on what you mean by "intensity of use."
Maybe some weighted measure of population density, residential density, job density, retail density, daytime population density, public amenities/spaces density, proximity to other tracts (and how they fare in the same categories), ease of access to other tracts (and how those tracts fare in the same categories) and all those done over some averaging of peaks by days and months and done under fine granularity in terms of the area being covered (measured in blocks/neighborhoods rather than large chunks).

Walkscore does a pretty decent heatmap based on just retail, public amenities, and transit. How do you feel about it? I think the neighborhood boundaries aren't so useful because they sometimes corral very different parts of the city together and the overall city walkscores aren't too useful because on such a large scale you lose details which for someone who's walking means pretty much everything, but the heatmap seems pretty good.

I think if I ever get off my lazy ass and on to my coding ass, I'll probably try to do something with the yelp api so that it's not just the distance and hitting a list of types of amenities and stores, but also weighing in the quality and variety of the amenities (reviews and subcategories/types) being offered on a heatmap which would then show a difference between a taco bell stand and a really good and varied mexican joint complete with cervezas and morrissey on karaoke.
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Old 04-30-2013, 06:35 PM
 
940 posts, read 1,739,807 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
I would imagine ths would have to be some form of job, residential, transit, retail, restaurant, event, cultural activity density...
....
Not sure but if you normalized these measure somehow and factored them together in theory you could create a use intesnsity metric
Thanks kidphilly, this is exactly the kind of thing I was talking about. Some theoretically quantifiable way of measuring how much human activity (commerce, cultural exchange, habitation, etc) there is in a given amount of space.
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Old 04-30-2013, 08:26 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,174 posts, read 23,705,057 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dweebo2220 View Post
Thanks kidphilly, this is exactly the kind of thing I was talking about. Some theoretically quantifiable way of measuring how much human activity (commerce, cultural exchange, habitation, etc) there is in a given amount of space.
There has to be a definition of scale though, and in different ways. One is the size of the basic block size by which you're measuring these densities enough so you can actually get some idea of what it's like on a human, walkable scale. The other is how contiguous it is with other blocks (let's say one area abuts something that causes all those densities to go down such as a very large park or an industrial area) as it's relatively easy to move from one of these areas to another. Another is transit (and the quality of it which includes cost and time) to see how easy it is to access areas that are a bit further flung. Still another, and this one takes a page out of biogeography, how big the scale the total of these contiguous and/or connected areas are as that larger network allows for the growth of the kind of activities/events/amenities/identities that can't arise from a smaller scale.
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Old 05-01-2013, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,269 posts, read 26,273,936 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
There has to be a definition of scale though, and in different ways. One is the size of the basic block size by which you're measuring these densities enough so you can actually get some idea of what it's like on a human, walkable scale. The other is how contiguous it is with other blocks (let's say one area abuts something that causes all those densities to go down such as a very large park or an industrial area) as it's relatively easy to move from one of these areas to another. Another is transit (and the quality of it which includes cost and time) to see how easy it is to access areas that are a bit further flung. Still another, and this one takes a page out of biogeography, how big the scale the total of these contiguous and/or connected areas are as that larger network allows for the growth of the kind of activities/events/amenities/identities that can't arise from a smaller scale.
This is a good point. I'd say that the contiguity is important. You can have an environment like this that's clearly urban, but most people would not call the city as a whole very urban because it only lasts for a few blocks. Here's an example of contiguous urbanity that's three dimensional and spans a little more than a few blocks. But there's not enough of this built environment to really feel like you're in a city and the population density is not all that high. Then you have places like this that has a great deal of continuity over a relatively large footprint.
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Old 05-01-2013, 08:26 AM
 
Location: The City
22,341 posts, read 32,192,195 times
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Maybe define some arbirtrary sets for calculation

1 mile, 3 mile, 10 mile radius for calculated metric densities. (removing water, or maybe airports I suppose)

Then determine the metrics (Population, workforce etc.)

Calculate a mean for each metric based on the 40 largest metros and acummulate the indexed calclulations

population and workforce are probably easiest
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Old 05-06-2013, 11:00 AM
 
56,708 posts, read 81,038,544 times
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What about an area like this in one of the most dense cities in Upstate NY: Google Maps Street View
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Old 05-06-2013, 11:01 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,110,921 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
What about an area like this in one of the most dense cities in Upstate NY: Google Maps Street View
Looks good (no thanks on the climate).
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Old 05-06-2013, 12:08 PM
 
56,708 posts, read 81,038,544 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Looks good (no thanks on the climate).
That part of Upstate NY gets less snow in the winter than others. Life still goes on due to being prepared to handle it though.
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Old 05-06-2013, 12:15 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,110,921 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
That part of Upstate NY gets less snow in the winter than others. Life still goes on due to being prepared to handle it though.
Yeah, I know. I lived in northern New England once. I was impressed with the winter activities but the cold was just not for me!
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