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Old 04-25-2013, 09:38 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
In other words, "suburbs" can mean anything the poster wants them to mean.
The "suburbs" mean one thing it's not the same as posters use "suburban". Rather than arguing with word choice, if you have confusion ask.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
As has been explained 100 times

Areas can be suburban (adjective) in form, that is, low density, autocentric and spread out, regardless of their geopolitical definition.

"The suburbs" (plural noun) generally refer to municipalities, incorporated or not, outside of the city limits. With different and "better" schools.

Much of the city of Denver is suburban in form, as is true in many US cities.

Quote:
Generally used on this forum to describe an area with housing built since the arbitrarily chosen date of 1945. This is generally "understood" by those on a higher plane to mean single family housing, as some actually think little multi-family housing has been built since then.
No one has said that on this thread. 1945 is often a convenient break in housing styles. Perhaps we can get back to the thread?
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Old 04-25-2013, 10:10 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,649,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
In short, an urban place or experience is a spot where daily life feels more public.
Well, shoot! I was on the phone with my daughter and blew away most of the response to this post. So you're lucky, I'll condense. What about "daily life" is more public in a city than in the suburbs? My normal "daily life" consists of, on a work day, going to work in a public place. Sometimes, if the drive-through line isn't too long, I stop at McDonald's a public place, and get a cup of coffee on the way to the office. My office is more public than a lot of places that a lot of other people, urban and suburban, work. It's a medical office. People "walk in" all the time. People show up at our office for an appointment they have with the orthopedics office with the same name in the building next door. We don't card people at a front desk like they do at a lot of places where my husband has worked.

I generally eat lunch at the hospital cafeteria, but some people go out for lunch, or go to Target or even (gasp!) Walmart or Kohl's. I get home from work and generally, I stay in. If we don't feel like cooking, we get carry-out. Repeat.

On weekends, we go to public places.



Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The "suburbs" mean one thing it's not the same as posters use "suburban". Rather than arguing with word choice, if you have confusion ask.






No one has said that on this thread. 1945 is often a convenient break in housing styles. Perhaps we can get back to the thread?
I'm sorry, but I'm not going to ask a bunch of people who do not have degrees either in English or Urban Planning to explain their language errors to me. "Suburban" has to be a subset of "suburb"; that's all there is to it. The word "suburb" is contained within suburban. The urbanists on this forum have cooked up this "suburban" usage to mean "it looks like a suburb", meaning, well what? And "suburban" can be in the city, per this definition. But "suburb" supposedly means outside the city. People have posted that they live in a suburb within a city as well, then say they're using the above definition.

I am not off topic here, we are trying to define what urban means. Urban life did not stop in 1945, despite what many on this forum think. And I do not like people screwing around with my posts, either.
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Old 04-25-2013, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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From Wiki

Quote:
A suburb is a residential area, either existing as part of a city or urban area (as in Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom), or as a separate residential community within commuting distance of a city (as in the United States and Canada). Some suburbs have a degree of administrative autonomy, and most have lower population densities than inner city neighborhoods. Suburbs first emerged on a large scale in the 19th and 20th centuries as a result of improved rail and road transport, which led to an increase in commuting. Suburbs tend to proliferate around cities that have an abundance of adjacent flat land.[1] Any particular suburban area is referred to as a suburb, while suburban areas on the whole are referred to as the suburbs or suburbia, with the demonym for a suburb-dweller being suburbanite. Colloquial usage sometimes shortens the term to burb.

...

United States and Canada

In the United States and Canada, suburb can refer either to an outlying residential area of a city or town or to a separate municipality, borough, or unincorporated area outside a town or city. The latter definition is evident in the title of David Rusk's book Cities Without Suburbs (ISBN 0-943875-73-0), which promotes metropolitan government. Note, however, that this definition is not universal. In fact, many of the classic streetcar suburbs are within the political boundaries of their respective cities, such as West Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, a part of which has is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as the West Philadelphia Streetcar Suburb Historic District.
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Old 04-25-2013, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,263,727 times
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More of suburban Philadelphia.

Wynnefield, Philadelphia, PA - Google Maps

West Oak Lane, Philadelphia, PA - Google Maps

East Falls, Philadelphia, PA - Google Maps

Roxborough, Philadelphia, PA - Google Maps
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Old 04-25-2013, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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"Back in Philly we be out in the Park...a place called the Plateau is where everybody go."

Philadelphia, PA - Google Maps


DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince - Summertime - YouTube
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Old 04-25-2013, 10:37 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I'm sorry, but I'm not going to ask a bunch of people who do not have degrees either in English or Urban Planning to explain their language errors to me. .
It takes a degree in such to understand nouns and adjectives?
And how do you know what people have degrees in?
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Old 04-25-2013, 10:42 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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roland park - Google Maps Roland Park, Suburban Baltimore

roland park - Google Maps Cheswolde, Suburban Baltimore

Pikesville md - Google MapsPikesville, suburb of Baltimore

parkville md - Google Maps Parkville, suburb of Baltimore
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Old 04-25-2013, 10:46 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,649,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
It takes a degree in such to understand nouns and adjectives?
And how do you know what people have degrees in?
Some have said what their degrees are in. (Darn few, though) If the noun is wholly contained within the adjective, then what does that mean? Does that mean the adjective pertains to the noun, e.g. "suburban schools", "suburban police force", etc? Or does it mean something entirely different, e.g. the noun is outside the city, where the adjective can be anywhere?
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Old 04-25-2013, 10:51 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,108,470 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Some have said what their degrees are in. (Darn few, though) If the noun is wholly contained within the adjective, then what does that mean? Does that mean the adjective pertains to the noun, e.g. "suburban schools", "suburban police force", etc? Or does it mean something entirely different, e.g. the noun is outside the city, where the adjective can be anywhere?
The word came about first as an adjective to describe places that are less than urban. Suburban.
Only after its establishment as an adjective could it have been shortened to be used as a noun. Shifts like this happen all the time in English. At one time shop was a noun, now it can be an verb also, the infinitive being "to shop."

To your second point, look at the first two examples I posted above. 9/10 people would describe them as "suburban in appearance." Yet they do not have a "suburban school" or a "suburban police force" or any suburban services, because they are in the city.

Look at the final two examples. They would be described as suburban in appearance yet they do have a suburban police force and suburban schools, because they are in the suburbs.
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Old 04-25-2013, 11:04 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,649,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
The word came about first as an adjective to describe places that are less than urban. Suburban.
Only after its establishment as an adjective could it have been shortened to be used as a noun. Shifts like this happen all the time in English. At one time shop was a noun, now it can be an verb also, the infinitive being "to shop."

To your second point, look at the first two examples I posted above. 9/10 people would describe them as "suburban in appearance." Yet they do not have a "suburban school" or a "suburban police force" or any suburban services, because they are in the city.

Look at the final two examples. They would be described as suburban in appearance yet they do have a suburban police force and suburban schools, because they are in the suburbs.
Do you have any documentation of this evolution? How could something be "suburban" w/o knowing what a suburb is? It's not the same as a noun being used as a verb.

To your last point, they're only suburban if that's what you think suburban means.
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