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Old 04-25-2013, 11:24 AM
 
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As I stated in my original post, it's my assessment that "suburban" has referred more to an approach or perspective vis-a-vis an existing urban center than it has to a specific built form. Brooklyn Heights is often referred to as "America's First Suburb" and it was rowhouses and apartment blocks from the get-go. Obviously, the "suburban ideal" has evolved over time and now we think of "cookie cutter" detached sfh's when we think "suburb."

Because it's a state of mind, suburban has often meant different things depending on where you are standing.
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Old 04-25-2013, 01:45 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dweebo2220 View Post
^^^ It gets difficult when you start trying to compare in terms of degree... ie which is more urban, x or y?

We might all agree that that small town's main street is urban in terms of structural density, pedestrian/street orientation, etc.

But is it more urban than, say, San Luis Obispo's main street?:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=san+l...2,68.7,,0,-5.4
I think they are similar, but SLO's main street just has more offerings or bigger/longer. Architecture is different, but I don't think that should change the dynamics of urbanity, but it may for some.

I like how SLO is set up, btw.

Here are some other examples from the Syracuse area: Westcott Street, Syracuse, NY - Google Maps

Eastwood Syracuse, NY - Google Maps

Hawley-Green Syracuse, NY - Google Maps

North Salina and Butternut Syracuse, NY - Google Maps

South Avenue and Glenwood Syracuse, NY - Google Maps

West Genesee and North Franklin Syracuse, NY - Google Maps

South Salina and West colvin Syracuse, NY - Google Maps

North Lowell and West Genesee Syracuse, NY - Google Maps

Here are some suburban/surrounding villages: East syracuse, NY - Google Maps

Solvay, NY - Google Maps

Liverpool, NY - Google Maps

Baldwinsville, NY - Google Maps

Fayetteville, NY - Google Maps

Skaneateles, NY - Google Maps


I think you may have some crossover between what is urban when looking at the neighborhoods/villages posted here.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 04-25-2013 at 02:18 PM..
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Old 04-27-2013, 08:08 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
What about "daily life" is more public in a city than in the suburbs? My normal "daily life" consists of, on a work day, going to work in a public place. Sometimes, if the drive-through line isn't too long, I stop at McDonald's a public place, and get a cup of coffee on the way to the office. My office is more public than a lot of places that a lot of other people, urban and suburban, work. It's a medical office. I generally eat lunch at the hospital cafeteria, but some people go out for lunch, or go to Target or even (gasp!) Walmart or Kohl's. I get home from work and generally, I stay in. If we don't feel like cooking, we get carry-out. Repeat.
Sounds like you drive to work. In a more urban lifestyle one would spend the "home to job" time either walking a public street or on public transit. The drive up window at McD is the most private place you could possibly buy coffee, compared to actually walking into a neighborhood coffee shop where there are people. Most suburban office complexes/hospitals offer the option of either lunch in the building or getting in your car to drive to a drive up window or strip mall for lunch. A very urban workplace would typically have MANY lunch options within walking distance, so lunch time would be spent walking a public street to a public restaurant. In a very urban setting, if you don't feel like cooking, you have the option of walking to dozens of different nearby public restaurants.

Thank you for demonstrating how suburban life is less public than urban life.
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Old 04-27-2013, 08:23 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Yes, that's what I meant. The only public things Katiana listed are places where you see other people doing the same, going to the same place. You don't really see people going elsewhere. I gave more examples of public things that make a place urban to me in the post previously:

http://www.city-data.com/forum/29280688-post5.html

If I go out to get a slice of pizza, I'll pass by a bunch of people on my walk, doing their own thing. There even be an event going in the center of town if I walk a bit out of my way. If I did the same at my parent's, I'd drive and not see much else.

Or when my mom works, if she gets lunch, she walks a bit and passes by lots people, many non-office workers from all walks of life.

Of course, plenty of people in urban places drive, the difference is there are still people out there if you wander out on the streets.
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Old 04-27-2013, 09:48 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
Sounds like you drive to work. In a more urban lifestyle one would spend the "home to job" time either walking a public street or on public transit. The drive up window at McD is the most private place you could possibly buy coffee, compared to actually walking into a neighborhood coffee shop where there are people. Most suburban office complexes/hospitals offer the option of either lunch in the building or getting in your car to drive to a drive up window or strip mall for lunch. A very urban workplace would typically have MANY lunch options within walking distance, so lunch time would be spent walking a public street to a public restaurant. In a very urban setting, if you don't feel like cooking, you have the option of walking to dozens of different nearby public restaurants.

Thank you for demonstrating how suburban life is less public than urban life.
How do you know? Many of the people I know who live/work in Denver drive to work, go to drive-throughs, etc. Most hospital nurses get 30 minutes for lunch. They don't walk anywhere except to the hospital cafeteria, or maybe the breakroom, where they eat a lunch they've brought from home. Even with an hour, and even with places within an easy walk (or short drive for that matter), it's hard to go somewhere, order, eat and be back to work on time. BTDT.

Your snark is duly noted.
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Old 04-27-2013, 10:04 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
How do you know? Many of the people I know who live/work in Denver drive to work, go to drive-throughs, etc. Most hospital nurses get 30 minutes for lunch. They don't walk anywhere except to the hospital cafeteria, or maybe the breakroom, where they eat a lunch they've brought from home. Even with an hour, and even with places within an easy walk (or short drive for that matter), it's hard to go somewhere, order, eat and be back to work on time. BTDT.

Your snark is duly noted.
You very specifically asked,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana
What about "daily life" is more public in a city than in the suburbs?
Then gave your own personal life as an example. I answered your question.
I can not think of a more perfect example of the difference between "private" and "public" than your own example of getting coffee at a drive up lane at McDonalds vs walking to the corner coffee shop.
Thank you for proving the point!
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Old 04-27-2013, 10:49 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,003 posts, read 102,592,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
You very specifically asked,



Then gave your own personal life as an example. I answered your question.
I can not think of a more perfect example of the difference between "private" and "public" than your own example of getting coffee at a drive up lane at McDonalds vs walking to the corner coffee shop.
Thank you for proving the point!
Knock off the snark! Just because you can't think of a better example doesn't mean one doesn't exist.

How many people do you personally know who walk to a corner coffee shop before work in the morning? I'm not talking about people who have a coffee shop or cart in their office. I'm talking about taking a separate trip.

Please answer with a specific number.
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Old 04-27-2013, 10:52 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Knock off the snark! Just because you can't think of a better example doesn't mean one doesn't exist.
You gave that example...

Quote:
How many people do you personally know who walk to a corner coffee shop before work in the morning? I'm not talking about people who have a coffee shop or cart in their office. I'm talking about taking a separate trip.

Please answer with a specific number.
Me. Sometimes.

I'm not sure what this has to do with anything I said though [that a space with people on the streets feels more public and to me, urban].
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Old 04-27-2013, 10:55 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
You gave that example...



Me. Sometimes.

I'm not sure what this has to do with anything I said though [that a space with people on the streets feels more public and to me, urban].
And I do what I do. Sometimes. Is McDonald's a private club now?
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Old 04-27-2013, 12:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
You gave that example...
Me. Sometimes.


Me. Almost everyday. I frequent 3 different coffee shops depending on the day's plan.
Early morning all of them are VERY busy and none have a drive-thru lane.
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