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Old 04-27-2013, 03:08 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
This is generally "understood" by those on a higher plane to mean single family housing, as some actually think little multi-family housing has been built since then.
No one said that here, at least on this thread, but some places have much more multi-family than others. You'll get more new multi-family in the West (say, California) where population growth is high and often land is limited, older housing tends towards single-family rather than the Boston metro, where much of the older housing stock was multi-family already. You can find number on multifamily units here by state and if you do out the numbers will get growth:

Historical Census of Housing Tables - Units in Structure
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Old 04-27-2013, 03:27 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Looking back at my post that you quoted, I should have said "some think little multi-family housing has been built in the suburbs". I can document that, but then you'll say I'm dredging up old posts, so take my word for it.
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Old 04-28-2013, 06:34 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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The poster here had a different idea of urban than most on the forum:

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Ryu View Post
The area is predominantly Black and the rest of the make-up being Latino. Other minorities make a small percentage. (white, asian, indian,etc). It is really Urban in comparison to other neighborhoods (UWS, UES, LES, etc) The urban culture brings the street hustle, gangs/drug activity, thugs/thug mamis, etc.
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Old 04-29-2013, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The poster here had a different idea of urban than most on the forum:
That's interesting. When the majority of dense city neighborhoods are largely white in the next 50 years, will we call white kids who attend selective private and magnet schools "urban youth?" Will we start calling current day "Urban Radio" Suburban Radio?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mainstream_Urban
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Old 04-29-2013, 01:14 PM
 
Location: In the heights
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Knock off the snark! Just because you can't think of a better example doesn't mean one doesn't exist.

How many people do you personally know who walk to a corner coffee shop before work in the morning? I'm not talking about people who have a coffee shop or cart in their office. I'm talking about taking a separate trip.

Please answer with a specific number.
Probably in the hundreds, but I think some of them drink tea or don't drink caffeinated beverages at all. They don't really have to go out of their way though, which would sort of make it not so urban and if they did have to do that then I'm guessing the count would drop way lower.
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Old 04-29-2013, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
How many people do you personally know who walk to a corner coffee shop before work in the morning? I'm not talking about people who have a coffee shop or cart in their office. I'm talking about taking a separate trip.
I do that just about every day. But I don't drink coffee. I usually get a croissant or some type of pastry.
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Old 04-29-2013, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Probably in the hundreds, but I think some of them drink tea or don't drink caffeinated beverages at all. They don't really have to go out of their way though, which would sort of make it not so urban and if they did have to do that then I'm guessing the count would drop way lower.
I'm not totally following this argument, but here is my two cents about (what I think is) the argument:

When I was in Boston and worked in a coffee shop - I'd say the number of people that stopped in for a morning cup of coffee daily before work in the immediate Coolidge Corner area alone was in the hundreds (just for our shop, there was also a Starbucks two doors down). I would estimate that at least 75% of our customers arrived on foot or via the C Line.

Personally I like to make my own coffee at home (gotta keep up those barista skills in one way or another ) but even in my apartment building I see a handful of people with their "Cafe De Cahuenga" cups in the elevators, etc. I suppose they could have driven there but it is 700 feet away so I don't imagine many do.

That's not to say I never walked to stores when I lived in uber-suburban Thousand Oaks. My wife (then GF) rented a house that was about a quarter of a mile to this . So we could walk to some bars and a grocery store, some restaurants, etc.

I generally agree that life in the city is more public, however I wouldn't say that suburban living is an exclusively private affair.

Last edited by munchitup; 04-29-2013 at 01:33 PM.. Reason: Fixed link
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Old 04-29-2013, 01:38 PM
 
Location: In the heights
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
I'm not totally following this argument, but here is my two cents about (what I think is) the argument:

When I was in Boston and worked in a coffee shop - I'd say the number of people that stopped in for a morning cup of coffee daily before work in the immediate Coolidge Corner area alone was in the hundreds (just for our shop, there was also a Starbucks two doors down). I would estimate that at least 75% of our customers arrived on foot or via the C Line.

Personally I like to make my own coffee at home (gotta keep up those barista skills in one way or another ) but even in my apartment building I see a handful of people with their "Cafe De Cahuenga" cups in the elevators, etc. I suppose they could have driven there but it is 700 feet away so I don't imagine many do.

That's not to say I never walked to stores when I lived in uber-suburban Thousand Oaks. My wife (then GF) rented a house that was about a quarter of a mile to this . So we could walk to some bars and a grocery store, some restaurants, etc.

I generally agree that life in the city is more public, however I wouldn't say that suburban living is an exclusively private affair.
Yea, just that suburban living is often less public and the form doesn't always follow the function.

Here's an interesting neighborhood I saw when I was in Buffalo last week:

Elmwood Village

This is the main commercial strip for the Elmwood Village neighborhood with a bit of stuff going on in roads parallel a few blocks to the east and west and sometimes perpendicular to it. Judging from my own experience, it looks like things have changed for the better since 2011 when the streetview was taken, but the difference isn't huge. Nearly all the streets that intersect with this strip are large SFHs and this street itself have quite a few though the first floor, street-facing parts of many of them have been converted to shops. There are also some professionals (medical professionals, real estate offices, professional services, and some community organizations of sorts) who have set up in those homes either on this strip or just off of it. The neighborhood as a whole is fairly suburban, but there are a lot of people walking about (though I'm guessing winter kills off quite a bit of that). There's a higher frequency bus line that plies the route all day. While suburban in form, there seems to be enough density and activity where people on streets off the commercial strip are also walking to get to their destinations from home. It also seemed like some of the big houses have been somewhat converted into multi-residential units.
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Old 04-29-2013, 05:48 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,649,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
I'm not totally following this argument, but here is my two cents about (what I think is) the argument:

When I was in Boston and worked in a coffee shop - I'd say the number of people that stopped in for a morning cup of coffee daily before work in the immediate Coolidge Corner area alone was in the hundreds (just for our shop, there was also a Starbucks two doors down). I would estimate that at least 75% of our customers arrived on foot or via the C Line.

Personally I like to make my own coffee at home (gotta keep up those barista skills in one way or another ) but even in my apartment building I see a handful of people with their "Cafe De Cahuenga" cups in the elevators, etc. I suppose they could have driven there but it is 700 feet away so I don't imagine many do.

That's not to say I never walked to stores when I lived in uber-suburban Thousand Oaks. My wife (then GF) rented a house that was about a quarter of a mile to this . So we could walk to some bars and a grocery store, some restaurants, etc.

I generally agree that life in the city is more public, however I wouldn't say that suburban living is an exclusively private affair.
Well, I was just curious how many people would make a separate walking trip to the coffee shop. I know if I couldn't drive through the drive-through, I would skip the coffee and just drink the swill at work. In fact, if there are too many cars in the queue, or I'm running late (most days), that's what I do. I'd never have time to make two separate trips. I'd guess many do drive/take transit and then walk to the coffee shop, and then the office.

DH works in a very suburban area of Westminster, CO and he has a few restaurants he can walk to, as restaurants usually locate near offices.
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Old 04-29-2013, 05:57 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post

DH works in a very suburban area of Westminster, CO and he has a few restaurants he can walk to, as restaurants usually locate near offices.
You just used suburban as an adjective.
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