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Old 04-30-2013, 12:24 PM
 
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The density of Brownsville (neighborhood surrounding Marcus Garvey Village) is more like 40,000+ per sq mi. The vast majority of the housing is multi-unit and there is a high concentration of high-rises just east with a sub area density closer to 100,000+ per sq mile.

Marcus Garvey Village (55 units per acre):











Surrounding neighborhood:

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Old 04-30-2013, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Liminal Space
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If you want to restrict the question to the specific 1970s architectural idea in a few NYC housing projects, the answer is no. If you are asking more generally about low-rise high-density housing, this is a pretty apt description of practically all non-rural housing in existence prior to mid-20th Century and is almost certainly still the vast majority of housing in the world to this day. So the answer in that case would be a resounding "Yes."
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Old 04-30-2013, 10:39 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nykiddo718718 View Post
I cruised around a little on Google maps. Are there public spaces somewhere on the property?



That's the NYC affordable housing architecture of the time. I actually think they look pretty cool. In fact, I think a lot of NYCHA buildings of the 1970s were very innovative.



To be fair, a lot of New Yorkers consider anything low rise = suburban, lol.

Well, Marcus Garvey Village is quite the contrast compared to the surrounding NYCHA high rises. Though less dense, it was built to the street wall. It also houses more people per acre then the typical area rowhouse, all the while providing walkable semi-private spaces and even commercial storefronts on a nearby primary street. Smarter, more efficient, urban land use.

I'll tell you what, I like it a lot more then the cheap crap infill that surrounds it. Subsidized multi unit row houses with driveways.The 1990s were worse. Totally out of character and inefficient considering demand and the neighborhoods density. These are so horrible, I hate them.

I think this sort of construction has a place in the future in certain types of neighborhoods. Like Marcus Garvey Village, high density walkable primarily residential streets and mixed use apartments on the major arteries. Too low density for NYC at this time though.

I like the idea of mid-rise development and what you might call traditional neighborhood design in general, but this just looks like really poor execution of it. And its not TND either. I guess the only thing the Marcus Harvey place has in common with the suburbs is being a residential development that appears to be zoned exclusively for housing. There's no mixed uses. You're still dependent on your car to get to the store. Which makes it no better than living in a single-family housing suburb, except just denser. So you sort of have the worst of both worlds, urban and suburban, but none of the benefits of either.

Besides that the architecture leaves something to desired. why do the buildings have to be so monotone and depressing? Are the designers allergic to color? They have a very cheap, stark prison-like quality to them. And could be mistaken for one.

I mean what the heck is this supposed to be? Did the designers of this thing use Riker's island for their inspiration when coming up with this brilliant design? It has to be someone's idea of an April Fools joke right? But the sad thing is it probably wasn't lol.

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Is There a Future for Low-Rise High-Density Housing?-lrhd_14-600x400.jpg  
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Old 04-30-2013, 11:53 PM
 
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Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
I mean what the heck is this supposed to be? Did the designers of this thing use Riker's island for their inspiration when coming up with this brilliant design? It has to be someone's idea of an April Fools joke right? But the sad thing is it probably wasn't lol.
I actually really like this one. I'd live there.
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Old 05-01-2013, 05:41 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Those concrete stairs need some improvement. And some color accents would help.
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Old 05-01-2013, 08:17 AM
 
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By color accents do you mean graffiti?
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Old 05-01-2013, 08:31 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
By color accents do you mean graffiti?
No.
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Old 05-01-2013, 11:09 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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https://maps.google.com/maps?q=rowle...,,0,-8.81&z=16

This London rowhouse block looks kinda similar. As to ugly brutalist 70s architurcture, I actually like these:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Roose...2,10.06,,0,-22
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Old 05-01-2013, 11:20 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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The OP's example of Brownsville, Brooklyn for low-rise high-density housing is a bit strange. From what I've heard, it's one of the most dangerous neighborhoods in the city, if not the most. Marcus Garvey Village is near blocks of high rise housing projects (one of the largest in the country) and itself probably isn't safe. The OP would know more, but I think I'm correct.
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Old 05-01-2013, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Portland, Maine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
Looks like the density near that Marcus Garvey Village is between 25-35k ppsm. The Miracle Mile view RCL posted is about 10k - the Miracle Mile is not particularly dense but I would say it has decent/average public transit and is on the high side of walkability.

I was thinking more along the lines of this: east hollywood, ca - Google Maps

It may look nearly identical to the duplexes and small apartment buildings of the Miracle Mile, but the difference is the building takes up nearly the entire lot - the difference in density is noticeable, as that area I posted is around 40k+ ppsm. Household sizes in East Hollywood / Central LA are larger than on the Westside / Miracle Mile, which also plays a small part (not as much as the increases structural density though).

Another example from Central Hollywood: miracle mile, los angeles - Google Maps

This is higher-rise, around 3-5 stories per building. This area has a density of 35k ppsm.

This is pretty typical of the new development going up in Los Angeles - 3-7 stories tall, ground floor retail, underground parking: Currywurst, North Fairfax Avenue, Los Angeles, CA - Google Maps
I was surprised with the last one you posted because a building similar to that was built in Boston recently but it was five stories and some people on a forum called archboston complained that it was not dense enough and should have been taller. I didn't expect to see something so similar built in such different cities and the materials even look similar.
But I think what you posted fits well for LA and does what it is meant to do.
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