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Old 12-23-2013, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Chandler, AZ
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You can scratch LA & SF from that list of possibilities due to the sky-high cost of land out here caused by politicians.
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Old 12-23-2013, 10:09 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marv101 View Post
You can scratch LA & SF from that list of possibilities due to the sky-high cost of land out here caused by politicians.
What you said about San Francisco and Los Angeles is too much of a false generalization. Some neighborhoods are much more affordable, lower cost of living compared to other neighborhoods, and the more affordable neighborhood arenít always too discouraging. There is some very nice lower cost of living neighborhoods.

There is more of a future in low rise high density housing in Los Angeles because there is more available land for new architecture urban planning projects, and lower density levels. There is available land left in San Francisco. If not in San Francisco, there is always the rest of San Francisco metropolitan region, and a bright future in low rise high density urban planning project in the majority of the bay area.

I plan to live in a successful, pleasant , and affordable low rise high density housing in a place such as Napa, less than 1 hour away from San Francisco.
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Old 12-24-2013, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,650,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
Yes, at least in Los Angeles there is a future for low-rise high-density housing. Which is basically what Los Angeles is completely made up of.
Yup, same story in Oakland. I live in one such neighborhood now.

This is a pic of a nearby neighborhood.

https://maps.gstatic.com/m/streetvie...375486274,,0,0

This block is 60s fabulous, some of more 1920s buildings others more like 1980s, and single family homes are mixed in as well. Larger ones go for 800k+ in the midst of condos and rentals.


Quote:
Originally Posted by CountryFisher View Post
Yep, this person pretty much said it.

I guess these pro-density people want to try to force everyone to live like cramped sardines in outrageously expensive high-rises with no yard, space or privacy, give up their cars, walk everywhere, take "public transportation" with strange people and have everyone lived by a controlled schedule by the govt just to "save the earth".

Maybe that's why the "green activist" people hate "low density" suburbs and cars so much, because these things give people the freedom to do whatever they want when they want without the government controlling what they do.

I have to say that those apartment row houses or whatever they're called are ugly and cold looking as hell. They look like communist jail cells. Seems depressing to live in those kinds of places.
Guess what....some of us like transit and living in denser walkable areas. I have a car I like, and I choose to not drive it quite often. I find transit frees me up from dealing with crowded parking lots, parking meters,and worrying about the effects if a cocktail with dinner. Sign me up. The give meant has been controlling what I do for quite a while, but not freeing up cities to create mixed use zoning and let the market decide how much parking is needed for a given development.
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Old 12-27-2013, 07:00 PM
 
6,056 posts, read 10,839,435 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Yup, same story in Oakland. I live in one such neighborhood now.

This is a pic of a nearby neighborhood.

https://maps.gstatic.com/m/streetvie...375486274,,0,0

This block is 60s fabulous, some of more 1920s buildings others more like 1980s, and single family homes are mixed in as well. Larger ones go for 800k+ in the midst of condos and rentals.


Guess what....some of us like transit and living in denser walkable areas. I have a car I like, and I choose to not drive it quite often. I find transit frees me up from dealing with crowded parking lots, parking meters,and worrying about the effects if a cocktail with dinner. Sign me up. The give meant has been controlling what I do for quite a while, but not freeing up cities to create mixed use zoning and let the market decide how much parking is needed for a given development.
I live in a successful, and pleasant low rise high density building and area of Seattle in Lake City less than 5 blocks away from suburbs for $725 a month.

Your visual image reminds me of some of Lake City in Seattle, and nice looking, and pleasant low rise high density homes.

There should be more low rise high density buildings in places such as Berkeley, Napa, and maybe Oakland.
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Old 01-03-2014, 09:29 PM
 
Location: Chandler, AZ
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Low-rise high density housing here in LA won't work because the high-rise high density building spree which has been going on here in LA for well over a decade isn't working.

Urban planners continue to be bewildered by the tepid response while they continue to insist that infill housing is the way to go, but survey after survey has unequivocally proven that ramming people into such housing doesn't work for families, but only for well-off couples & singles who have no intention of having kids.

Consequently the end result is skyrocketing housing prices, which does nothing for the city's tax base while serving as a major deterrent for folks to move here.

Downtown LA has 52,000 people living there in a city of 3,800,000; what does that tell you?

Finally, those folks do not get rid of their cars, much to the consternation of Jerry Brown and Al Gore and other boneheaded liberal elites, as well as their environmental zealots that they answer to at the expense of everyone else.
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Old 01-04-2014, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Chandler, AZ
5,802 posts, read 5,460,455 times
Reputation: 3113
If you've priced a house in LA and especially SF over the past two decades, then you know that my previous post was not a 'false generation';

When you deliberately restrict the availability of a given entity (vacant land in this case), the price of the land as well as the house which sits on it is bound to explode and/or plunge depending on how much the government intervenes in the economy, which is enormous both statewide and nationwide.

That's Economics 101.
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Old 01-04-2014, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,650,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marv101 View Post
Low-rise high density housing here in LA won't work because the high-rise high density building spree which has been going on here in LA for well over a decade isn't working.

Urban planners continue to be bewildered by the tepid response while they continue to insist that infill housing is the way to go, but survey after survey has unequivocally proven that ramming people into such housing doesn't work for families, but only for well-off couples & singles who have no intention of having kids.

Consequently the end result is skyrocketing housing prices, which does nothing for the city's tax base while serving as a major deterrent for folks to move here.


Downtown LA has 52,000 people living there in a city of 3,800,000; what does that tell you?

Finally, those folks do not get rid of their cars, much to the consternation of Jerry Brown and Al Gore and other boneheaded liberal elites, as well as their environmental zealots that they answer to at the expense of everyone else.

Your premise is off. The only reason that housing doesn't work for families is because they only build places with 1-2 bedrooms. I have lost neighbors because they ran out of space. Meanwhile the 3 bedroom spots in my neighborhood sell in weeks to families with kids. There is no supply.

Separately families are shrinking and kids are less common. Families rarely have more than 2 kids.

Downtown is still retry patchy and is missing retail. Not a real neighborhood yet, it was abandoned for 50 years...are you surprised the population is low?

Also car usage is declining. People are driving 10-15% less miles than they did 3 years before and more people are opting out of driving. Your experience doesn't mirror the trends at all.
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Old 01-14-2014, 09:55 PM
 
46 posts, read 59,162 times
Reputation: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marv101 View Post
Low-rise high density housing here in LA won't work because the high-rise high density building spree which has been going on here in LA for well over a decade isn't working.

Urban planners continue to be bewildered by the tepid response while they continue to insist that infill housing is the way to go, but survey after survey has unequivocally proven that ramming people into such housing doesn't work for families, but only for well-off couples & singles who have no intention of having kids.

Consequently the end result is skyrocketing housing prices, which does nothing for the city's tax base while serving as a major deterrent for folks to move here.

Downtown LA has 52,000 people living there in a city of 3,800,000; what does that tell you?

Finally, those folks do not get rid of their cars, much to the consternation of Jerry Brown and Al Gore and other boneheaded liberal elites, as well as their environmental zealots that they answer to at the expense of everyone else.
Can you clarify? According to an online blog/article I came across, "Trends in American High-Rise Construction by David Holmes" (not sure if we can post links - look it up), Los Angeles high rise construction has been less than half of San Diego from 2000-2013 and even less than cities like Miami and Arlington. It may not be the most rigorous research, but it makes sense to me. Just touring Los Angeles (although I am not a resident anymore) the last time I did a few months ago, it didn't seem to have much going on at all. I mean for a 3.8 million city, it was certainly lackluster (like a lot of things about this city although I still like it for its non-man-made aspects and relative newness). When I was in Portland, OR (a far better built city, certainly for its population) for comparison it seemed to have more high rise construction on the waterfront alone.

And why do you say high rise hasn't worked even if were all that much? In downtown, you have more foot traffic and its the best its been in a long time. It seems people want to live in denser housing and right now there are plans to introduce more high rise condos near the Staple Center. But again, you have to actually BUILD first, before calling a project a failure and LA for a city its size hasn't really been doing as much as other places with respect to high-rise housing IMO.

Last edited by mak2675; 01-14-2014 at 10:07 PM..
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