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Old 05-02-2013, 12:47 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I just asked a question about the actual people posting here. Anybody never left the country? Homophobic? Never attend college? Shop at Wal-Mart?

so you're trying to make a point about this forum, but not about the general correlation of those items?

There are loads of affluent college educated suburban republicans,who, whatever they feel about a dinner on 8th street after a ballgame, are not at all effective demand for WUP real estate. Similarly there are Romney voters in most yuppie city neighborhoods (maybe not so much in NYC) though a lot of them prefer to call themselve libertarians rather than Republicans.
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Old 05-02-2013, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
The folks who've told you rich=liberal have sold you a bill of goods.
Who said "rich=liberal?" George Bush, Mitt Romney, Sheldon Adelson and Donald Trump clearly show that that's not the case.

The assertion was made that upper middle class whites tend to be liberal. You can be upper middle class without being rich. I would call an associate professor upper middle class even though he might earn less than a mechanic.
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Old 05-02-2013, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,455 posts, read 11,958,801 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
The assertion was made that upper middle class whites tend to be liberal. You can be upper middle class without being rich. I would call an associate professor upper middle class even though he might earn less than a mechanic.
But would you call his graduate assistant making $16,000 per year plus student loans? What about the adjunct professor who makes like $30,000 and has zero job security?
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Old 05-02-2013, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
so you're trying to make a point about this forum, but not about the general correlation of those items?
I'm genuinely interested in the answers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
There are loads of affluent college educated suburban republicans,who, whatever they feel about a dinner on 8th street after a ballgame, are not at all effective demand for WUP real estate. Similarly there are Romney voters in most yuppie city neighborhoods (maybe not so much in NYC) though a lot of them prefer to call themselve libertarians rather than Republicans.
Nobody's doubting that. But that's kind of like trying to rebut the claim that most blacks vote for the Democratic Party by pointing out that roughly 8 to 10% of blacks vote Republican every election cycle. That does nothing to disprove the general trend.
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Old 05-02-2013, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
But would you call his graduate assistant making $16,000 per year plus student loans? What about the adjunct professor who makes like $30,000 and has zero job security?
I would. I don't think class is really defined by income. Would you call a public defender that attended Yale Law School "middle class" or "working class?" Or better yet, "poor?" I wouldn't. It's as much about the prestige of the profession as it is the income (though most prestigious professions tend to be financially rewarding).

On the flipside, I would not call the aviation mechanic for Delta "upper middle class" because he runs a crew and makes $200,000 per year. I'd call that "high prole."
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Old 05-02-2013, 01:02 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,817 posts, read 10,727,564 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Who said "rich=liberal?" George Bush, Mitt Romney, Sheldon Adelson and Donald Trump clearly show that that's not the case.

The assertion was made that upper middle class whites tend to be liberal. You can be upper middle class without being rich. I would call an associate professor upper middle class even though he might earn less than a mechanic.

I think there are republican across the income spectrum. Obama may have won the majority of the college educated (who probably voted more dem than any high income group leaving education aside), but it wasnt that overwhelming - nothing compared his majority among blacks.
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Old 05-02-2013, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
I think there are republican across the income spectrum. Obama may have won the majority of the college educated (who probably voted more dem than any high income group leaving education aside), but it wasnt that overwhelming - nothing compared his majority among blacks.
Well, of course it's not going to be anything like it was among blacks. I think Philadelphia had some precincts that reported 100% for Obama. But that's clearly an anomaly that's unlikely to ever be repeated again anywhere.
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Old 05-02-2013, 01:05 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,817 posts, read 10,727,564 times
Reputation: 2523
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I would. I don't think class is really defined by income. Would you call a public defender that attended Yale Law School "middle class" or "working class?" Or better yet, "poor?" I wouldn't. It's as much about the prestige of the profession as it is the income (though most prestigious professions tend to be financially rewarding).

On the flipside, I would not call the aviation mechanic for Delta "upper middle class" because he runs a crew and makes $200,000 per year. I'd call that "high prole."

but to return to how we got here - i criticized Kotkin for ignoring price. You suggested that (to paraphrase) that would drives demand is not the numbers with a given preference, but their effective demand - those with higher incomes will have more impact on relative prices than those with lower incomes. Which is, broadly speaking correct.

But it depends on actual incomes, not on prestige, or social affiliation, or other aspects of class. An aviation mechanic earning 200k is more effective demand than a grad asst making 16k.
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Old 05-02-2013, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,279 posts, read 26,292,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
but to return to how we got here - i criticized Kotkin for ignoring price. You suggested that (to paraphrase) that would drives demand is not the numbers with a given preference, but their effective demand - those with higher incomes will have more impact on relative prices than those with lower incomes. Which is, broadly speaking correct.
My comments may have been based upon an initial misread of your comment. My point was simply that higher prices in WUPs isn't evidence that the majority of people want to live in WUPs. If my initial read of your comment was wrong, then I suppose everything else I said was all for naught.
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Old 05-02-2013, 01:11 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,817 posts, read 10,727,564 times
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maybe this is a generational thing. When I was 20something it was NOT de rigeur for a new college grad to live in an urban neighborhood. The people who did so were either seriously committed to it, or they lived in a city big enough (essentially NYC) that suburban living was a huge practical hardship. In baltimore, for example there were yuppie suburban garden apt complexes, filled with 20 something college grads. My impression about DC is that the many garden apt complexes in FFX and MoCo , which, now that they are 40 yrs old, are homes to hispanic immigrants werefirst built for affluent young people, mostly.

But today its almost assumed that urban life is the first stage of post college life - the mark of the commited, is staying after kids are born.
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