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Old 05-04-2013, 12:47 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The flight of the old population is higher than the decline numbers suggest, as while the (mostly white) residents left, black residents and immigrants moved in. For example, for New York City, the population decline stopped in 1980 but high outmigration continued for much longer. Since the metro has a whole had rather slow growth, rather than just flight to the suburbs it was flight to other regions of the country as well.
Pittsburgh is one of the whitest cities in the country; it also has a very low immigrant rate, both from the US and other countries, including Mexico.
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Old 05-04-2013, 12:49 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Pittsburgh is one of the whitest cities in the country; it also has a very low immigrant rate, both from the US and other countries, including Mexico.
I realize; I wasn't referring specifically to Pittsburgh.
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Old 05-04-2013, 12:56 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I realize; I wasn't referring specifically to Pittsburgh.
Just giving an example of a city that did not have a lot of black and/or immigration growth. I think the black growth in Pittsburgh came during the "Great Migration" from the south, not in the 60s and following. For some reason, there has been very little immigration to Pittsburgh from Mexico, despite the fact that many cities that would be improbable, at first glance, for Mexican immigration such as Omaha have good-sized Mexican-American communities. The little immigration from abroad has been mostly people moving there to go to college; some have to leave when their student visas expire. There's not a huge tech industry there to attract HB-1 workers, either.
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Old 05-04-2013, 01:27 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Just giving an example of a city that did not have a lot of black and/or immigration growth. I think the black growth in Pittsburgh came during the "Great Migration" from the south, not in the 60s and following. For some reason, there has been very little immigration to Pittsburgh from Mexico, despite the fact that many cities that would be improbable, at first glance, for Mexican immigration such as Omaha have good-sized Mexican-American communities. The little immigration from abroad has been mostly people moving there to go to college; some have to leave when their student visas expire. There's not a huge tech industry there to attract HB-1 workers, either.
Yea, seems like Pittsburgh had less of a demographic transition than many cities. I think Baltimore (and maybe St. Louis? Not really sure there) had some metro growth while the city population declined and its demographics drastically changed.

As for Mexican immigration, I wouldn't have expected Pittsburgh to have much, few Northeastern cities do, at least until recently. Around here, the hispanic population appears to heavily Puerto Rican, and Boston has a Dominican presence. I knew many hispanics back on Long Island but few Mexicans. Mexicans make about 14% of the hispanic population of New York City. In the last decade, the fastest growth was in the Asian population
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Old 05-04-2013, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I don't think people really "fled" the cities. They were able to buy houses, some the first in their families to own a home. They wanted a little piece of land. So they went to the burbs.
It wasn't just about homeownership, because many cities (like Philadelphia, for example) had high levels of home ownership within city limits.

I agree though, that the first 20 years or so of movement to the suburbs was a positive flow to something desired, not a negative flow from something detested. From my reading of history, people of that generation thought cities were run-down, dirty, and crowded, but didn't actually fear them.
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Old 05-04-2013, 07:25 PM
 
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The immigration I have seen in Pittsburgh seems to be mostly asian or eastern european. Last I stayed in a hotel there (last year) the front desk staff was mostly native born blacks and whites but housekeeping seemed to be entirely eastern european.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
It wasn't just about homeownership, because many cities (like Philadelphia, for example) had high levels of home ownership within city limits.
Home ownership in Philly is still a little higher than the national average and probably on the rise.
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Old 05-04-2013, 07:29 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Much faster than that, there was definitely a period of flight, especially in Northeastern and Rust Belt cities

I think the interpretation that there was a period of flight from many cities from 1970 to 1980 is supportable.
Agreed - and I maintain that the bulk of it was old people dying or moving on to retirement homes.

Philadelphia, for instance, was still a majority white city in the 1980s. The real demographic change there was between 1980 and 1990.
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Old 05-04-2013, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drive carephilly View Post
The immigration I have seen in Pittsburgh seems to be mostly asian or eastern european. Last I stayed in a hotel there (last year) the front desk staff was mostly native born blacks and whites but housekeeping seemed to be entirely eastern european.
There aren't that many recent Eastern European immigrants I can think of in Pittsburgh. Most of the remaining born in Europe are very old now. There is a small Russian emigre community in Squirrel Hill (the traditional Jewish neighborhood in the city), but it probably only numbers a few hundred.

Asians are far and away the largest group in Pittsburgh. Most of those within the city limits are college or graduate students who are mostly attending Carnegie Mellon University, and a fairly even mix of Chinese and Indian. There's also an Indian enclave set up in a cluster of apartment buildings out in the suburbs. Nearly everyone in these apartments is Indian, and they all work downtown - it's odd to see the bus from here unload in the morning. Within the city, the largest immigrant communities right now are refugees - Somali bantu and more recently Bhutanese (who are mostly ethnic Nepalis).
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Old 05-04-2013, 07:49 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Pittsburgh demographics:

Foreign born population: 18,874 (5.6%)
(39.1% of them are naturalized citizens)


Most common places of birth for the foreign-born residents (%)
Italy (9%)
India (8%)
China, excluding Hong Kong and Taiwan (8%)
Germany (5%)
Korea (5%)
Russia (4%)
Japan (4%)

Place of birth for U.S.-born residents:

This state: 261318
Northeast: 13428
Midwest: 13593
South: 20546
West: 4682


58% of Pittsburgh residents lived in the same house 5 years ago.
Out of people who lived in different houses, 68% lived in this county.
Out of people who lived in different counties, 46% lived in Pennsylvania.

Read more: http://www.city-data.com/housing/hou...#ixzz2SNXWUEQ2
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Old 05-04-2013, 08:44 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
There aren't that many recent Eastern European immigrants I can think of in Pittsburgh.
Maybe because they blend in to existing ethnic communities pretty well? It seems like there's been quite a bit of immigration from the former Yugoslavia over the last 10-15 years.

I know in the Philly area there's quite a bit of immigration from Russia, Ukraine, Poland and Northern Ireland but you don't hear as much about it because they move to Northeast Philly or just over the city line in places like Upper Darby.
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