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Old 05-04-2013, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Pittsburgh demographics:
Italy still being number 1 astounds me. There aren't too many Italians I can think of, except ancient women who still live in Bloomfield. It's not clear from the link if the numbers are from the 2000 or 2010 census. Otherwise the results are pretty much what I would have expected.

Note, when I said "immigrant communities" I meant groups that settle in roughly one area of the city as a group. Many immigrants are middle class and integrate pretty well into the Greater East End. The top ESL languages in Pittsburgh are now Nepalese, Somali Bantu, then Spanish.
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Old 05-04-2013, 08:58 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Italy still being number 1 astounds me. There aren't too many Italians I can think of, except ancient women who still live in Bloomfield. It's not clear from the link if the numbers are from the 2000 or 2010 census. Otherwise the results are pretty much what I would have expected.
Well it comes out to 0.5% of the population was born in Italy.

Having some Italian born population left isn't too rare, some Italians came after WWII. For Suffolk County, NY (Long Island) Italy is still #2, 7% of foreign born after El Salvador (12%), so about 1% of Suffolk County's population was born Italy, double that of Pittsburgh
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Old 05-04-2013, 10:17 PM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,838,412 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drive carephilly View Post
Agreed - and I maintain that the bulk of it was old people dying or moving on to retirement homes.
Oh, come on. Was there some huge generational bump there? I don't think there was.

Quote:
Philadelphia, for instance, was still a majority white city in the 1980s. The real demographic change there was between 1980 and 1990.
White Black Hispanic
1970 1,278,717 653,831 N/A
1980 983,084 638,878 63,570
1990 754,859 631,936 89,193

So, yes, there was real demographic change between 1980 and 1990. But 1970 and 1980 was still a bigger change.
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Old 05-04-2013, 11:29 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
I think smog and noise pollution were major contributors in driving people away from the cities.

As cities streets started to become ore and more prioritized for the automobile they became very noisy and polluted places. City streets were widened, sidewalks narrowed, speed limits were raised, historical buildings knocked down to make way for parking lots, etc. City streets became filled with noisy automobile traffic that emitted great amounts of toxic exhaust fumes. Quiet trolleys and streetcars were replaced with noisy diesel buses that belched thick clouds of black smoke from their tailpipes, contributing further to the noise and smog problem.

It's not not very pleasant to live in a building on a wide street with no setback where you are directly exposed to the automobile traffic below. It's almost like living on the side of a freeway. The incredible amount of noise pollution becomes unbearable but you can't escape it because its always in your face. You try to keep your windows closed but even that can't keep it out completely. Being on the upper floors doesn't help much because the noise simply bounces against the walls of the buildings until it reaches you.

Which helps explain why skyscraper cities with all their super tall buildings are some of the greatest generators of noise pollution. And the smog rises all the way up from the streets until it reaches you and you breathe it in. As cities became more and more dominated by the automobile, that was the beginning of the end for them as people fled from them en masse as they headed for the quiet cul-de-sacs of suburbia.
Meh, semi disagree. First of all, many people moved from the cities to suburbs due to either poor living conditions or the promise of the "American Dream" with more land around them. This STILL happens with immigrants who have been here long enough. Eventually they get more money and they decide they want more land and a bigger property with that new money, so they move to a more suburban location.

I also semi disagree about the noise pollution part. Ask anybody who's been living in a city for more than 6 months and it's a non factor. I live in downtown Chicago and when I first moved here, I thought the noise of all the cabs and stuff sucked. A month or two later, it didn't even phase me. It still doesn't phase me years later and I can sleep with my windows open to the sound of the city and not be the slightest bit affected. In the first month, I couldn't do it. Now I can sleep like a baby even if I hear a bunch of cabs honking..which is only if I'm taking an afternoon nap...let's be realistic now. Unless it's a friday or saturday night, 2am around me is pretty quiet actually.

Some people might not get used to it, but there are THOUSANDS of people in the US living in this type of situation by choice. I mean honestly, all the multi million dollar condos in NYC, Chicago, etc in busy areas..you don't think they can afford to live anywhere else? For the price of a really nice place, you can get way better in the burbs. There is a building next to me, one of the most expensive, that is $3000/month minimum for a 1 bedroom, 1000 sq foot apartment. They could get 5 times as much sq footage in the burbs. They are doing it on purpose, so obviously the noise doesn't affect them like you think. My monthly rent could easily afford me a decently nice home in the burbs. I live here on purpose, not because I HAVE to. The noise to me has become a huge non factor. The only annoying thing is emergency sirens and cab drivers. Besides that, there's not much in the way of actual noise and it's not like living next to a freeway in the least bit.

Last edited by marothisu; 05-04-2013 at 11:37 PM..
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Old 05-05-2013, 12:55 AM
 
Location: Ypsilanti
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^^ I sleep with music on or my tv on anyways, so the noise when I go to a city is nothing. Actually growing up when my family would go on trips and stay in a hotel, my parents would want the tv off at like midnite that was the worst lol, I couldn't fall asleep at all... for some reason I sleep better when there is something distracting me.
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Old 05-05-2013, 06:45 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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There are also very quiet residential areas of cities, like where I live - except for the occasional maniac driver blowing through the stop sign *shakes fist
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Old 05-05-2013, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weteath View Post
^^ I sleep with music on or my tv on anyways, so the noise when I go to a city is nothing. Actually growing up when my family would go on trips and stay in a hotel, my parents would want the tv off at like midnite that was the worst lol, I couldn't fall asleep at all... for some reason I sleep better when there is something distracting me.
Kind of same here. Don't NEED it but can do it. Actually, I usually need something like a fan or something to sleep comfortably for some reason. I'll get hot and wake up with a headache half the time if I don't have something like a fan, A/C, etc. I'm screwed..lol

Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
There are also very quiet residential areas of cities, like where I live - except for the occasional maniac driver blowing through the stop sign *shakes fist
That's very true, especially if you're on the lower levels. In my greater neighborhood, Gold Coast, there is a section that's full of mansions (original Playboy Mansion for example), huge row homes, and also high rises. Right south of there is a street called Division which has a bunch of crap college looking bars that's very popular.

If you go to the area with the mansions (which has a little bit of a buffer), you can't even hear all the noise from that street. Even when the Blackhawks won the Stanley Cup in 2010, there were tons of people just out on that street and in the mansion area, you couldn't hear them. The trees and buildings blocked out the sound.

That's true of pretty much anywhere here. Most more residential streets don't have a random bar on them (I mean many do, but the majority don't) and cabs don't need to honk or anything because there's no HUGE traffic on these. Very quiet even though they are right in the city and even might be a 5 minute walk to a ton of bars..you still can't hear it unless you're in a highrise way up with your windows open.

For the record, in my 25th floor apartment.. I can't hear ANY street noise or almost anything from outside with my windows closed unless a fire truck has its sirens on right near me. That means for at least 4 months of the year, noise at my place isn't a problem in the least bit. It's as quiet as my parents' suburban home in Minnesota.
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Old 05-05-2013, 08:28 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Required reading:

The Ghetto Is Public Policy - Ta-Nehisi Coates - The Atlantic
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Old 05-05-2013, 10:42 AM
 
7,598 posts, read 9,457,529 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Yea, seems like Pittsburgh had less of a demographic transition than many cities. I think Baltimore (and maybe St. Louis? Not really sure there) had some metro growth while the city population declined and its demographics drastically changed.

As for Mexican immigration, I wouldn't have expected Pittsburgh to have much, few Northeastern cities do, at least until recently. Around here, the hispanic population appears to heavily Puerto Rican, and Boston has a Dominican presence. I knew many hispanics back on Long Island but few Mexicans. Mexicans make about 14% of the hispanic population of New York City. In the last decade, the fastest growth was in the Asian population
Yes, I suspect that Pittsburgh's peak for attracting immigrants was probably in the first few decades of the 20th century, if not slightly before, in order to fill the iron and steel-making industries ( one side of my own family was in on this). Since then, there has been the slow, steady atrophy, but recently there are many signs of life, particularly around the Univ. of Pittsburgh Medical Center, which is thriving..

With Pitt not being along the Eastern Seaboard, and no longer having much "heavy" industry, it would be relatively easy for immigrants from south of the border to bypass it...
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Old 05-05-2013, 10:46 AM
 
7,598 posts, read 9,457,529 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weteath View Post
^^ I sleep with music on or my tv on anyways, so the noise when I go to a city is nothing. Actually growing up when my family would go on trips and stay in a hotel, my parents would want the tv off at like midnite that was the worst lol, I couldn't fall asleep at all... for some reason I sleep better when there is something distracting me.
I usually find that usuing a small table fan from CVS ( about $15) does a nice job of blotting out any excess peripheral noise, and the whirling of the blades is almost sleep-inducing, as well..
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