U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-05-2013, 02:33 PM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,265,560 times
Reputation: 2924

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post

Some people might not get used to it, but there are THOUSANDS of people in the US living in this type of situation by choice. I mean honestly, all the multi million dollar condos in NYC, Chicago, etc in busy areas..you don't think they can afford to live anywhere else? For the price of a really nice place, you can get way better in the burbs. There is a building next to me, one of the most expensive, that is $3000/month minimum for a 1 bedroom, 1000 sq foot apartment. They could get 5 times as much sq footage in the burbs. They are doing it on purpose, so obviously the noise doesn't affect them like you think. My monthly rent could easily afford me a decently nice home in the burbs. I live here on purpose, not because I HAVE to. The noise to me has become a huge non factor. The only annoying thing is emergency sirens and cab drivers. Besides that, there's not much in the way of actual noise and it's not like living next to a freeway in the least bit.

I don't dispute what you're saying. Obviously, some can and do tolerate big city life. Some might even prefer the noise and excitement to the dull existence of suburban life. But most cannot. Many like to visit the city, many others will commute to it, but they don't want to live there for the most part. NYC doesn't represent the living preferences of most of the country where 70% live in a single family house in a suburban area. Another 10% live in suburban condos and apartments, about 5% in rural areas. Which leaves about 15% residing in the cities. Urbanites are the minority.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-05-2013, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Ypsilanti
389 posts, read 400,453 times
Reputation: 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
I don't dispute what you're saying. Obviously, some can and do tolerate big city life. Some might even prefer the noise and excitement to the dull existence of suburban life. But most cannot. Many like to visit the city, many others will commute to it, but they don't want to live there for the most part. NYC doesn't represent the living preferences of most of the country where 70% live in a single family house in a suburban area. Another 10% live in suburban condos and apartments, about 5% in rural areas. Which leaves about 15% residing in the cities. Urbanites are the minority.
There are other factors that go into it tho, one in particular such as cost.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2013, 05:24 PM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,265,560 times
Reputation: 2924
Quote:
Originally Posted by weteath View Post
There are other factors that go into it tho, one in particular such as cost.

Knowing the people I grew up with in the suburbs you couldn't get them to move to a place like NYC, San Francisco or Chicago if you paid them to and let them live rent free. They see cities as places that are filled with crime, drugs, homeless, gays, heathens, illegal immigrants, and general debauchery and filth. And many are very religious. Believe me they couldn't care what it cost they would never do it. And that could probably describe the general anti-urban attitude of the majority of posters on city-data.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2013, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,798 posts, read 19,010,012 times
Reputation: 6805
Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
I don't dispute what you're saying. Obviously, some can and do tolerate big city life. Some might even prefer the noise and excitement to the dull existence of suburban life. But most cannot. Many like to visit the city, many others will commute to it, but they don't want to live there for the most part. NYC doesn't represent the living preferences of most of the country where 70% live in a single family house in a suburban area. Another 10% live in suburban condos and apartments, about 5% in rural areas. Which leaves about 15% residing in the cities. Urbanites are the minority.
I know that many people want to live in a more suburban lifestyle. Saying otherwise is very ignorant.

That being said, I think you have a partially skewed sense of what a city is within the US. NYC is by far the largest concrete jungle in the US. While other cities such as Chicago, Boston, San Francisco, Philadelphia, etc have what NYC has, NYC by far has the largest. In all of these cities, it is not hard to find a single family home. Now, you aren't going to get a 2 acre yard out of it, but I mean....your view is a little skewed.

Let me give you a few examples from my city Chicago.

Here's one from the Irving Park neighborhood on the NW side of the city:
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-qWJ4voPqtC...0/P1060240.JPG

This is a house that's in the Ravenswood neighborhood, probably less than 1.5 miles from Wrigley Field, where the Cubs play and maybe hmm, 5 miles north of the CBD, but still miles from the edge of town:
http://images.neighborcity.com/images/19/75/5f/1f.jpg

Edgewater neighborhood:
http://rubloff.s3.amazonaws.com/prop...7553579_01.jpg

Here's another from Ravenswood
http://www.chicagomag.com/images/201...wood-House.jpg

Here's one from the Kenwood neighborhood (Obama's neighborhood) not too far from the University of Chicago:
http://s3.amazonaws.com/mrp-listings...50fe903c2c.jpg


I have lived in both city and suburban atmospheres both for many years, but what most people don't realize, who go to a city only to its downtown and a few other neighborhoods sometimes that are dense and still concrete jungle, is that most cities in the US have loads of very residential streets. Again, you aren't going to easily get an acre or two, but you can find them with yards and regular single family homes EASILY. If people really think that finding a single family home is hard in these cities, then they are completely misinformed about what all cities named New York City are. Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Fran, etc ALL have mixed housing in there. Single family homes, low rise apartment/condo buildings, two/three flats, high rises, etc. Not everything in these cities is multiple family dwellings. There are many, many single family homes.

Last edited by marothisu; 05-05-2013 at 05:38 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2013, 05:57 PM
 
7,596 posts, read 9,448,275 times
Reputation: 8955
Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
I know that many people want to live in a more suburban lifestyle. Saying otherwise is very ignorant.

That being said, I think you have a partially skewed sense of what a city is within the US. NYC is by far the largest concrete jungle in the US. While other cities such as Chicago, Boston, San Francisco, Philadelphia, etc have what NYC has, NYC by far has the largest. In all of these cities, it is not hard to find a single family home. Now, you aren't going to get a 2 acre yard out of it, but I mean....your view is a little skewed.

Let me give you a few examples from my city Chicago.

Here's one from the Irving Park neighborhood on the NW side of the city:
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-qWJ4voPqtC...0/P1060240.JPG

This is a house that's in the Ravenswood neighborhood, probably less than 1.5 miles from Wrigley Field, where the Cubs play and maybe hmm, 5 miles north of the CBD, but still miles from the edge of town:
http://images.neighborcity.com/images/19/75/5f/1f.jpg

Edgewater neighborhood:
http://rubloff.s3.amazonaws.com/prop...7553579_01.jpg

Here's another from Ravenswood
http://www.chicagomag.com/images/201...wood-House.jpg

Here's one from the Kenwood neighborhood (Obama's neighborhood) not too far from the University of Chicago:
http://s3.amazonaws.com/mrp-listings...50fe903c2c.jpg


I have lived in both city and suburban atmospheres both for many years, but what most people don't realize, who go to a city only to its downtown and a few other neighborhoods sometimes that are dense and still concrete jungle, is that most cities in the US have loads of very residential streets. Again, you aren't going to easily get an acre or two, but you can find them with yards and regular single family homes EASILY. If people really think that finding a single family home is hard in these cities, then they are completely misinformed about what all cities named New York City are. Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Fran, etc ALL have mixed housing in there. Single family homes, low rise apartment/condo buildings, two/three flats, high rises, etc. Not everything in these cities is multiple family dwellings. There are many, many single family homes.
Yes, there are a fair number of single-family homes in these cities, although they are a bit harder to find, and they may not represent the majority of available homes, and they might not quite match up with the preconceived image of suburban homes. ( i/e/ less spacous urban home lawns, few/no driveways, etc).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2013, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,798 posts, read 19,010,012 times
Reputation: 6805
Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
Yes, there are a fair number of single-family homes in these cities, although they are a bit harder to find, and they may not represent the majority of available homes, and they might not quite match up with the preconceived image of suburban homes. ( i/e/ less spacous urban home lawns, few/no driveways, etc).
In the smaller area cities like Boston, for example, yes maybe. In Chicago though, since it's big...there are definitely areas where it's a lot of SFH's. They don't match up with suburban homes..never said they did, but the point is that these places are not all just no tree/flower areas with almost no single family homes, and 100% brick, concrete, and asphalt.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2013, 06:05 PM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,265,560 times
Reputation: 2924
Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post

I have lived in both city and suburban atmospheres both for many years, but what most people don't realize, who go to a city only to its downtown and a few other neighborhoods sometimes that are dense and still concrete jungle, is that most cities in the US have loads of very residential streets. Again, you aren't going to easily get an acre or two, but you can find them with yards and regular single family homes EASILY. If people really think that finding a single family home is hard in these cities, then they are completely misinformed about what all cities named New York City are. Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Fran, etc ALL have mixed housing in there. Single family homes, low rise apartment/condo buildings, two/three flats, high rises, etc. Not everything in these cities is multiple family dwellings. There are many, many single family homes.

No doubt you can find many suburb like neighborhoods within city limits of those places. But to me many of them are sort of urban in name only. You may not have much walkability in these areas, there's limited transit and you often need a car to get around. For example I would consider the huge Richmond and Sunset Districts of San Francisco to be more like suburbs in that regard though they are within city limits. Mostly single-family detached housing with garages and driveways just like the suburbs, but on smaller lots. They are just as autocentric and not very walkable. To me those are people who want to get away from urban life and the noise and congestion of urban life as much as they can. They just happen to be within city limits.


Sunset District SF
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2013, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,798 posts, read 19,010,012 times
Reputation: 6805
Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
No doubt you can find many suburb like neighborhoods within city limits of those places. But to me many of them are sort of urban in name only. You may not have much walkability in these areas, there's limited transit and you often need a car to get around.
In Chicago in some areas that is not true at all. All of the neighborhoods I showed you (except Kenwood) have train stops in them and multiple bus routes running through them. My girlfriend used to live in Ravenswood in an apartment building on a street lined with single family homes. There was a train station 2 blocks away, but you could barely even hear the train go by when the windows were open.

I grew up in a suburban environment even through college (although my college town was walkable, it was still suburban-ish). When I would sleep over in the summer at my girlfriend's place...it sounded like where I grew up in. I would hear kids playing outside having fun and in the distance a lawnmower. YET, it was right near stores, cafes, bars, restaurants, etc, near a train station, and in 10 minutes you were at a hot nightlife area on the train and 20-25 minutes you were in downtown Chicago.

It's a common misconception that the homes are not near public transit and you need a car. The Mayor of Chicago lives in Ravenswood. I've even seen him taking the train home and it wasn't a publicity stunt. Even if you live in an apartment here, a lot of them in the non downtown areas are set up like this:
http://resideliving.com/images/commu...9/overview.jpg


This area is only a few blocks from a brown line train station in Chicago
http://goo.gl/maps/iVO1g

By the way, these are in no way the most suburban areas of Chicago. Though what I'm about to show you would qualify as mansions, but it's in the city and about 4 miles from downtown and not far from U of Chicago

Last edited by marothisu; 05-05-2013 at 06:25 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2013, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Monmouth County, NJ & Staten Island, NY
407 posts, read 407,497 times
Reputation: 661
Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
No doubt you can find many suburb like neighborhoods within city limits of those places. But to me many of them are sort of urban in name only. You may not have much walkability in these areas, there's limited transit and you often need a car to get around. For example I would consider the huge Richmond and Sunset Districts of San Francisco to be more like suburbs in that regard though they are within city limits. Mostly single-family detached housing with garages and driveways just like the suburbs, but on smaller lots. They are just as autocentric and not very walkable. To me those are people who want to get away from urban life and the noise and congestion of urban life as much as they can. They just happen to be within city limits.


Sunset District SF
I wouldn't call that area suburban, not even too sure about auto-centric...I guess as auto-centric as the average California urban neighborhood...with it's wide roads, abundant parking, driveways, SFH-style homes. But from the looks of it, it seems pretty walkable to me, and having a car would be a huge convenience but not really a necessity as it seems to have decent transit coverage as well. Not my cup of tea personally, but a nice compromise for someone who likes using their car but wants to have a relatively easy transit commute and values density/walkability over sparsity/true "driveability".

However, I do get the gist of what you're describing: suburban neighborhoods in the city limits, I think something like Ingleside Terraces would be a better example, though I say this as someone who has never been to San Fran, so go figure.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2013, 06:35 PM
 
415 posts, read 626,262 times
Reputation: 542
I was born on the south side of Chicago till I was 10, then we moved to the burbs, I hated the burbs as a kid..so I spent most my summers with my cousins in the city, then as I got older and could drive, I didn't care for the city. but got to laugh' my wife is from Poland, and last summer we went to a block party near mid way airport in the city, and my wife was freaked out how small the lots were and tiny the yards are, and then I told her you could fit 5 of these houses on our lot and still have 10 feet left over, she was like wow'' yep their 25' wide lots..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top