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Old 05-02-2013, 02:30 PM
 
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I think everyone is discussing an article that's mostly relevant to car companies. To the rest of us, I think the important narrative is decreasing miles traveled per capita. Millennials may become/may have otherwise been more interested in buying a car if the economy was better, but I think that ignores the trends that the bloggers dismisses in a single sentence. You can still own a car and drive a lot less. Millennials have shown some tendency to a lifestyle that is less auto-centric. If you live in an urban area and your friends live in an urban area, then it doesn't matter how you get there, you're driving a lot less than if you lived in different suburbs. Many urban areas are as nice or nicer than certain suburbs and often more expensive, so this isn't a trend that simply reverses itself as income increases.

 
Old 05-02-2013, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryuns View Post
I think everyone is discussing an article that's mostly relevant to car companies. To the rest of us, I think the important narrative is decreasing miles traveled per capita. Millennials may become/may have otherwise been more interested in buying a car if the economy was better, but I think that ignores the trends that the bloggers dismisses in a single sentence. You can still own a car and drive a lot less. Millennials have shown some tendency to a lifestyle that is less auto-centric. If you live in an urban area and your friends live in an urban area, then it doesn't matter how you get there, you're driving a lot less than if you lived in different suburbs. Many urban areas are as nice or nicer than certain suburbs and often more expensive, so this isn't a trend that simply reverses itself as income increases.
True. However, some urbanists are committed enough to city living they do the reverse commute. When I lived in DC, I worked in suburban Maryland, but lived in Capitol Hill. There was no way that I was going to move to a major metropolis and live in the suburbs, because I knew I would be lazy and not go out to shows in the city because I didn't want the hassle of driving. I drove every day for work, but work was the only reason I ever used my car, as mass transit + bike handled all of my shopping and socializing needs.

From what I gather, these kinds of reverse commutes are very common in the Bay Area, where many people choose to live in San Francisco, but then have to drive to an edge city for their place of employment.
 
Old 05-02-2013, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post

From what I gather, these kinds of reverse commutes are very common in the Bay Area, where many people choose to live in San Francisco, but then have to drive to an edge city for their place of employment.
There are about 5X as many people living in the SF burbs than in the city. I doubt many as a percentage of population, are doing that.
 
Old 05-02-2013, 02:52 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post

From what I gather, these kinds of reverse commutes are very common in the Bay Area, where many people choose to live in San Francisco, but then have to drive to an edge city for their place of employment.
It's mostly younger tech workers working in Silicon Valley. I read a stat (can't remember the source) that 30% of Google employees (at the Silicon Valley campus) use the Google shuttle. It appears the Google shuttle only covers San Francisco:

Human Transit: the silicon valley shuttles, revealed
 
Old 05-02-2013, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Bothell, Washington
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Originally Posted by emerald_octane View Post
I live in a city with decent transit. I have a car, but I plan to get rid of it and haven't used it for several months. I take the bus everywhere, even to Costco (although I look dumb doing so, lol). It's relatively convenient (near transit which takes me very close to work).

IF for some reason I really really needed a car for the weekend, I could rent one via Avis, Enterprise, or use Zipcar. Infact a lot of Apartment buildings around here (the nicer ones, anyway) have ZipCars within their parking garages for resident use at discounted rates.

Combine ZipCar + a card such as American Express for free rental coverage and you're cooking w/ kerosene.
That is still limiting in that you can't just hop in the car and go without any planning if you need to go somewhere that mass transit doesn't go. I suppose then a taxi would be an option for those who don't mind.
 
Old 05-02-2013, 03:49 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by jm31828 View Post
That is still limiting in that you can't just hop in the car and go without any planning if you need to go somewhere that mass transit doesn't go. I suppose then a taxi would be an option for those who don't mind.
That's true, but if you don't need a car that often the hassle might not be that big of a deal. I had a friend in Boston who would rent a car with a group when they went on hiking trips.
 
Old 05-02-2013, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
That's true, but if you don't need a car that often the hassle might not be that big of a deal. I had a friend in Boston who would rent a car with a group when they went on hiking trips.
yep, definitely did that with friends that could afford the ZipCar membership when we were out there. To the beach, hiking - and some people even rented cars for shopping trips to Costco, etc.

Also, not sure why reverse commuting got brought up, but it is relatively common with kids my age (by common I mean it is not out-of-the-ordinary, not that most people my age do that). My wife reverse commuted from Hollywood to Calabasas when we first moved here (she is now in DTLA, thank god). I knew some people in Boston that reverse commuted (they owned cars, obviously). I reverse commuted out to the suburbs for a job via the commuter rail - that lasted two days.
 
Old 05-02-2013, 09:20 PM
 
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
It's mostly younger tech workers working in Silicon Valley. I read a stat (can't remember the source) that 30% of Google employees (at the Silicon Valley campus) use the Google shuttle. It appears the Google shuttle only covers San Francisco:
No, there's Google buses which go all over the Bay Area. A lot of Googlers live in SF for the urban lifestyle (San Jose is a city, but not much of a city). Others live in Oakland for the hipster cred :-)
 
Old 05-02-2013, 09:22 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
No, there's Google buses which go all over the Bay Area. A lot of Googlers live in SF for the urban lifestyle (San Jose is a city, but not much of a city). Others live in Oakland for the hipster cred :-)
Isn't Google the company that lets you choose which 16 hours of the day you'll work? No wonder they have these vans. No one who works there has time to go and buy a car.
 
Old 05-02-2013, 09:36 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Isn't Google the company that lets you choose which 16 hours of the day you'll work? No wonder they have these vans. No one who works there has time to go and buy a car.
I can't imagine how the parking lots fill up, then :-)
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