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Old 05-02-2013, 09:29 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I'm not sure why having an office building near a residential area would be much different than a university. An office park is single-use by definition, but otherwise functionally I don't see the difference.

From universities I've seen, most of those who live within walking distance of a university are students. Some professors do live within a longer walk, but they tend to live further. Depends on the size of the university and town.
My experience with Boulder and Champaign-Urbana, the two college towns I have the most experience with, is that the "hip" areas for professors to live are in the "urban core" and generally a walk or at least a bike ride away from the University. These are both college towns of ~ 100K people, with universities of ~30K students. Now of course, not all profs live in these areas. These parts of town tend to be different than the student areas near the universities. Also, many professors are married to other professors, or to spouses who work at the university. So there's no juggling "where to live" with two locations. Many of these college towns are so small no place is very far from the school, e.g. Northfield.

Office parks are generally located in non-residential areas, as are factories.
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Old 05-03-2013, 10:01 AM
 
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My experience was from Burlington, VT and Madison, WI; there were faculty sections, and students sections, and the overlapped SLIGHTLY, but the profs held the higher--and better--grounds. I'm sure that they didn't want to listen to the late night/early morning parties being held a bit down the hill from them..
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Old 05-03-2013, 10:13 AM
 
Location: In the heights
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
My experience with Boulder and Champaign-Urbana, the two college towns I have the most experience with, is that the "hip" areas for professors to live are in the "urban core" and generally a walk or at least a bike ride away from the University. These are both college towns of ~ 100K people, with universities of ~30K students. Now of course, not all profs live in these areas. These parts of town tend to be different than the student areas near the universities. Also, many professors are married to other professors, or to spouses who work at the university. So there's no juggling "where to live" with two locations. Many of these college towns are so small no place is very far from the school, e.g. Northfield.

Office parks are generally located in non-residential areas, as are factories.
Most cities have their highest concentration of jobs and workplaces in and around downtown (though not necessarily a majority of a city's jobs--just a plurality). It's the driver for residential construction and conversion in downtowns and why traffic going into the downtown areas during the morning and getting out during the evening is usually the worst compared to other stretches.
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Old 05-03-2013, 02:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Most cities have their highest concentration of jobs and workplaces in and around downtown (though not necessarily a majority of a city's jobs--just a plurality). It's the driver for residential construction and conversion in downtowns and why traffic going into the downtown areas during the morning and getting out during the evening is usually the worst compared to other stretches.
Here's an interesting article about the percentage of jobs located in a metro for the 100 biggest metros in the US: Job Sprawl Stalls: The Great Recession and Metropolitan Employment Location | Brookings Institution

Here in Syracuse, there are areas where you have a higher concentration of faculty/staff and areas where there are more students(grad and undergrad). For instance, these are some areas where the faculty and some staff live in: berkeley drive syracuse, ny - Google Maps

Euclid Avenue, Syracuse, NY - Google Maps

Euclid Avenue, Syracuse, NY - Google Maps

Some may live in other old money parts of town or in the Eastern suburbs.

You do have a few business districts close by the campus as well: Marshall and Crouse Syracuse, NY - Google Maps

Irving and East Genesee Syracuse, NY - Google Maps

Westcott Syracuse, NY - Google Maps
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Old 05-03-2013, 06:30 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,982 posts, read 102,540,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Most cities have their highest concentration of jobs and workplaces in and around downtown (though not necessarily a majority of a city's jobs--just a plurality). It's the driver for residential construction and conversion in downtowns and why traffic going into the downtown areas during the morning and getting out during the evening is usually the worst compared to other stretches.
Your point? I'm talking about the hip neighborhoods in college towns, the two of which I referenced are about 100,000 people, not "most cities".

And yeah, believe it or not, I know why there's more traffic going into downtown in the morning and leaving in the evening. Shocking, I know.
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Old 05-03-2013, 06:49 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Your point? I'm talking about the hip neighborhoods in college towns, the two of which I referenced are about 100,000 people, not "most cities".
I think he meant that you can have plenty of people within walking distance of office buildings no differently than university buildings. Harder in a large city, but in a small city having lots office buildings downtown should be a large fraction of the population would in walking distance, no different than a university in a small city.
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Old 05-03-2013, 07:00 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,982 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I think he meant that you can have plenty of people within walking distance of office buildings no differently than university buildings. Harder in a large city, but in a small city having lots office buildings downtown should be a large fraction of the population would in walking distance, no different than a university in a small city.
Maybe, except that s/he said "most cities". I do not consider large cities "college towns", even if they have a college/university or two or three. It is true in Denver that the area around the U of Denver is very "college-townish", however.
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Old 05-04-2013, 09:06 PM
 
Location: New York City
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It may not be college towns (which are highly variable) as much as college campuses. They accustom people to living in small spaces with roommates and walking as the primary mode of transportation.

College campuses are one of the few places that expose people from suburban or rural areas to the aesthetics of walking. Then there are other amenities: lots of coffee, concerts, theater, libraries and proximity to like-minded people.

There are a lot of people who try and recreate to lifestyle later in life and it's easiest to do in an urban, walkable neighborhood.
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Old 05-09-2013, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Portland, Maine
457 posts, read 436,796 times
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Your description sounds almost exactly like hanover, NH the home of Dartmouth College.

Downtown Hanover: Hanover, NH - Google Maps

The Green: Hanover, NH - Google Maps
Hanover, NH - Google Maps

The Hop, Hood Museum of Art: Google Maps
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