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Old 05-06-2013, 06:21 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Quit being so condescending! Did you miss my post about my diverse school district? In addition, I attended school in a diverse district. I know all about the janitor's children and the lawyer's children attending school together, though in my own hometown it was the steelworkers' children and the steel engineers' children, for the most part, with a few doctors and lawyers thrown in.
In general, I think diverse school districts are less common than they used to be.
Quote:
BTW, I thought you lived in some high-end "inner-ring" suburb where everyone was part of the "creative class"?
If it's the city I think he lives in, the "creative class" is only in some neighborhoods (his?). It was mostly a blue collar town until a few decades ago. Anyway, his school is probably not a lower-income school. Better off than most of the inner schools in Boston (or many other cities) but not quite to level of many better off suburbs. It's at an in between where I think it's easier to do well.
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Old 05-06-2013, 06:28 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by semiurbanite View Post
It's not an experiment, it's the real world. If you live in a homogeneous suburb where everyone is of the same income, it may be hard to relate. But many towns and cities have school districts with significantly varied incomes, especially in small cities where the janitor's kids and the lawyers kids go to the same school. And in urban areas that are gentrifying where the higher income newcomers put their kids in the local schools. I see it all around me, and have been very surprised to see how many Harvard and MIT professors put their kids in the local school which are ranked poorly, yet their children tend to thrive. And lets face it, these parent understand education much more than most parents do.
I suspect for middle school and especially high school the school has tracking (accelerated classes, honors classes) so the professor kids go to "special" more challenging classes separate from the bulk of the student body. I remember one poster from a city school (checkmatechamp13) mentioned he was rather separated from the weaker students.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
And how many is that? Five? Excluding Boston Latin, that is.
He doesn't live within Boston proper.
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Old 05-06-2013, 02:00 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Quit being so condescending! Did you miss my post about my diverse school district? In addition, I attended school in a diverse district.
Umm, I said nothing about where you live! Where I live is very mixed, definitely not an upper class area, as many long time residents still live here. However prices are skyrocketing lately and those who bought here even 10 years ago can not afford to buy now.

And yes, as in most mixed income school districts where there is a decent portion of high SES student, there are separate classes for the high achieving students.
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Old 05-06-2013, 08:02 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by semiurbanite View Post
Umm, I said nothing about where you live! Where I live is very mixed, definitely not an upper class area, as many long time residents still live here. However prices are skyrocketing lately and those who bought here even 10 years ago can not afford to buy now.

And yes, as in most mixed income school districts where there is a decent portion of high SES student, there are separate classes for the high achieving students.
OK, I apologize, I did not say in this thread that my school district is very diverse. However, you gave a lecture about "diverstiy" that I did not need. School districts in Colorado are very large, and therefore, mostly diverse. The largest school district in this state is not Denver Public Schools but Jefferson County Schools with 85,000 students. It takes in everything from low-income suburbs like this: http://www.city-data.com/city/Edgewater-Colorado.html to chi-chi mountain suburbs like this: http://www.city-data.com/city/Evergreen-Colorado.html . My own district is similar, from "New Agey" mountain towns like this: http://www.city-data.com/city/Nederland-Colorado.html; http://www.city-data.com/city/Jamestown-Colorado.html; to a solidly middle-class burb like this one: http://www.city-data.com/city/Lafayette-Colorado.html, which has some pockets of poverty, to a college town like this one, which might be similar to where you live: http://www.city-data.com/city/Boulder-Colorado.html. Note Boulder has a fairly low household income; this is d/t the college students there. Note the value of homes in Boulder.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 05-06-2013 at 09:08 PM..
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Old 05-06-2013, 09:42 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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District being diverse is also pretty meaningless. Obviously, NYC, Chicago, or LA are diverse. That doesn't mean the bangers' kids are going to the same schools as the investment bankers' kids in Park Slopes. Even small districts (San Juan in Sacramento ~50,000) is quite diverse. That doesn't mean the they're going to the same school. Encino Prepatory, under-performing, 80+% on free/reduced lunch. Couple miles away are Rio Americano and Mira Loma... completely different demographics.
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Old 05-07-2013, 04:47 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
District being diverse is also pretty meaningless. Obviously, NYC, Chicago, or LA are diverse. That doesn't mean the bangers' kids are going to the same schools as the investment bankers' kids in Park Slopes. Even small districts (San Juan in Sacramento ~50,000) is quite diverse. That doesn't mean the they're going to the same school. Encino Prepatory, under-performing, 80+% on free/reduced lunch. Couple miles away are Rio Americano and Mira Loma... completely different demographics.
I suspect not too many investment bankers would choose to raise their kids in Park Slope, still too granola-y culture-wish; it almost gave Obama a vote of about 90%, too high for a neighborhood with investment bankers. Well for Park Slope, the friend I had that grew up in there (I'm told it was a popular high school for Park Slope residents) was this one:

Edward R. Murrow High School - insideschools.org

Few if any Long Island schools are that racially diverse, and its free lunch % is on the high side for Long Island. If the parents end up sending their kids to magnet schools, the income diversity is again at least as high. Racial diversity less, because most are majority Asian. My point is on average a rich parent in the suburbs is likely to find less income diversity [The Long Island forum regulars will point you towards that have less if you're looking for housing and have kids if you can afford it] vs the city at least for Long Island vs New York City.
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Old 05-07-2013, 07:37 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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^^Perhaps. You are the expert on LI and NYC on this forum. There are Denver suburbs with higher racial diversity than Denver itself. Some of Denver's charters require a certain percentage of kids on free-reduced lunches. It is against the law in CO to require a set percentage of any race or ethnic group. I think semiurbanite's point about more diversity in small towns is also true.
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Old 05-07-2013, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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What does this have to do with urban planning?
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Old 05-07-2013, 08:44 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
What does this have to do with urban planning?
It's the schools issue. The OP wants us to think that putting high-income kids in crappy schools is just fine; the kids will do just as well as in any other school. Apparently, this means city schools have no need to improve to attract people to the city.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 05-07-2013 at 09:18 AM..
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Old 05-07-2013, 01:54 PM
 
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I never said crappy schools, I said schools with lower scores but usually higher diversity. If you call that crappy, those are your words not mine.

My point is that SES drives student achievement, not the school itself. I don't consider a "low ranking" school to be crappy if the top 30% of student are from involved, highly educated parents (mostly Masters and PhD), but the lower 30% are Brazilian speaking and therefore scoring poorly, yet still come from strong families and do not disrupt the classroom.

See all of my links to studies showing that private school students do outperform public school student, UNTIL you control for SES. Once you control for SES, there is no difference in achievement. In one study the public school kids outperformed in math after adjusting for SES.
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