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Old 05-05-2013, 05:18 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,008 posts, read 102,606,536 times
Reputation: 33064

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I lived in a residential neighborhood in Denver; it was quiet, except for the couple downstairs who always were fighting, and they didn't live there the whole time we did. I now live in a residential suburban neighborhood. It's also quiet. In both neighborhoods, people mow lawns, walk their dogs, who bark, drive their cars, etc.
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Old 05-05-2013, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,798 posts, read 19,019,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I lived in a residential neighborhood in Denver; it was quiet, except for the couple downstairs who always were fighting, and they didn't live there the whole time we did. I now live in a residential suburban neighborhood. It's also quiet. In both neighborhoods, people mow lawns, walk their dogs, who bark, drive their cars, etc.
Of course. Anybody who's "been around" in the US and spent enough time in most cities, and outside of the central urban areas, knows that they all pretty much have many, many residential areas. Single family homes, yards, etc. They aren't one acre yards, but some neighborhoods definitely have yards big enough where it's going to take longer than 10 minutes to mow it all.

This notion that cities are one giant concrete jungle 100% of the area is just frivolous. NYC obviously has the most and other cities have it in large sections, but this notion that all US cities are almost all concrete jungle is just ridiculous. As for the noise pollution in cities - what you get depends on what part of town you are in. My girlfriend used to live in the North Center/Ravenswood part of town and every day waking up in the summer reminded me of where I grew up, which was a suburban neighborhood. I would hear kids playing every weekend morning and one person mowing their lawn in the distance. The only difference was that there was a CTA rail station a few blocks away (we'd almost never hear the train for the record) and it was mixed with single family homes, two and three flat buildings, and 10-20+ unit apartment/condo buildings. Very quiet though.
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Old 05-05-2013, 05:45 PM
 
1,211 posts, read 887,150 times
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Yards in our urban neighborhood are small enough that people use reel mowers, not gas powered ones. Either way it takes 5 minutes, not 45 minutes. As far as noise insulation, the combination of trees and dense housing creates alot more insulation than just trees in the suburbs.
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Old 05-05-2013, 05:54 PM
 
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I live in the 'burbs now but haven't outgrown urban life at all. I still enjoy it. I do enjoy having a proper vegetable garden, though, space for which would come at a premium in my old city neighborhood. I also don't miss the engaging human interactions because I find them here in the relative sticks too. The people I meet are well-schooled and intelligent, even "conventionally" sophisticated (some with Ivy League educations, professionally accomplished, whatever--whatever because no one preens either and are refreshingly down to earth).

Some amenities I do miss. Other things like the faux homeless spare change hounds (they ask for dollars actually) I most certainly don't.
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Old 05-05-2013, 05:56 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,798 posts, read 19,019,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by semiurbanite View Post
Yards in our urban neighborhood are small enough that people use reel mowers, not gas powered ones. Either way it takes 5 minutes, not 45 minutes. As far as noise insulation, the combination of trees and dense housing creates alot more insulation than just trees in the suburbs.
Yep and it pretty much depends on the area and city. There are some areas with small yards and there are some with ones that may take 20 minutes to mow or even longer. BUT, point is - too many people think there are no single family homes in cities
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Old 05-05-2013, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Monmouth County, NJ & Staten Island, NY
407 posts, read 407,708 times
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Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
This notion that cities are one giant concrete jungle 100% of the area is just frivolous. NYC obviously has the most and other cities have it in large sections, but this notion that all US cities are almost all concrete jungle is just ridiculous.
I absolutely agree with this, it all depends on the neighborhood. Most American cities have a huge variety of housing types, neighborhood types and such...you'll find some downright suburban neighborhoods in cities too, such as my neighborhood in the outer boroughs of NYC.

When I think of an urban concrete jungle hell-hole, I think of blocks like this one in Baltimore. Then you could go to another part of the city with a similar housing stock and find beautiful blocks like this. Still too urban for my tastes, so you also have downright suburban blocks like this one (though personally the overall lack of driveways would be a huge dealbreaker for me).

My own neighborhood in NYC is very suburban, and I while I do think about moving out someday to somewhere down south like Raleigh, I would certainly consider purchasing my first home in my own neighborhood, such as one of these small homes about a 5 minute drive away from my current home... Definitely not what most people think of when they think of NYC... For the cost of one of those little houses, I could probably get a much bigger house with more land in New Jersey, but assuming I'm working in Manhattan, the commute would be both longer and more expensive...if I lived here, I have the option of express bus, train + ferry or even driving in (once in a while of course, with those Manhattan prices lol). I could also live here and get to NJ in less than 10 minutes drive, if I worked there, or get to Brooklyn in less than 30 minutes if I worked there. Jersey also has much higher property taxes on average, compared to living on the island.
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Old 05-05-2013, 06:42 PM
 
7,598 posts, read 9,453,253 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KeepRightPassLeft View Post
I absolutely agree with this, it all depends on the neighborhood. Most American cities have a huge variety of housing types, neighborhood types and such...you'll find some downright suburban neighborhoods in cities too, such as my neighborhood in the outer boroughs of NYC.

When I think of an urban concrete jungle hell-hole, I think of blocks like this one in Baltimore. Then you could go to another part of the city with a similar housing stock and find beautiful blocks like this. Still too urban for my tastes, so you also have downright suburban blocks like this one (though personally the overall lack of driveways would be a huge dealbreaker for me).

My own neighborhood in NYC is very suburban, and I while I do think about moving out someday to somewhere down south like Raleigh, I would certainly consider purchasing my first home in my own neighborhood, such as one of these small homes about a 5 minute drive away from my current home... Definitely not what most people think of when they think of NYC... For the cost of one of those little houses, I could probably get a much bigger house with more land in New Jersey, but assuming I'm working in Manhattan, the commute would be both longer and more expensive...if I lived here, I have the option of express bus, train + ferry or even driving in (once in a while of course, with those Manhattan prices lol). I could also live here and get to NJ in less than 10 minutes drive, if I worked there, or get to Brooklyn in less than 30 minutes if I worked there. Jersey also has much higher property taxes on average, compared to living on the island.
Surprise, surprise, Bland Avenue in Baltimore is actually very nice....

It's also pretty easy to tell which homes on your Staten Island neighborhood are the youngest additions to the block..
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Old 05-05-2013, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Monmouth County, NJ & Staten Island, NY
407 posts, read 407,708 times
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Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
Surprise, surprise, Bland Avenue in Baltimore is actually very nice....

It's also pretty easy to tell which homes on your Staten Island neighborhood are the youngest additions to the block..
Haha yup! Though a lot of times what happens with those little ranch houses is that the roof is taken off and a second floor is added on, either by someone who lives there for a long time or by a builder who buys the house for renovation. I would consider doing it if I really found a good deal on a home in that neighborhood and chose to keep it and raise a family there (public schools in this area are actually pretty damn good compared to the rest of the city), in this neighborhood putting money into building up and renovating one of these homes can net you a pretty good amount when it comes time to sell...people around here really love this area. The problem is that sometimes, people expand these little old houses and make them totally out of character with the rest of the neighborhood which I would try to avoid. Kind of like what happened to my dearly departed great grandmother's old house here, which still has the original garage in the backyard. She sold the house to a developer back ~2003 and they turned it into this...house was originally built ~1925 lol.


Most new construction houses on Staten Island around my area typically look more like this, or these or these interesting houses...lol. We also get a lot of relatively dense infill developments like this going up around here, especially near train stations and express bus stops. One of my favorites has always been the houses like this, 1970s era detached homes, but they can get pricey usually in the 500k-800k range around here... My uncle and I talk about this all of the time, what kind of interesting home design comes out of the density and pseudo urban/suburban nature of the island.
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Old 05-05-2013, 08:00 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,008 posts, read 102,606,536 times
Reputation: 33064
Quote:
Originally Posted by semiurbanite View Post
Yards in our urban neighborhood are small enough that people use reel mowers, not gas powered ones. Either way it takes 5 minutes, not 45 minutes. As far as noise insulation, the combination of trees and dense housing creates alot more insulation than just trees in the suburbs.
Do you have some documentation for that?
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Old 05-05-2013, 08:12 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,798 posts, read 19,019,596 times
Reputation: 6805
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Do you have some documentation for that?
I'm not sure about more but it's actually true IF you are within the first few floors of the ground. Honestly. There is a very busy nightlife street near me in Chicago called Division and just north of it sits a bunch of mansions, huge row homes, etc with a few high rises mixed in. Very residential. If you go into the area with the mansions, which is about one block north of it, you cannot hear anything on the street level even though it's only a block away. Even when the Blackhawks won the Stanley Cup a few years ago and TONS of people were out in the street celebrating..you still could not hear it from street level.

I've noticed it in a ton of areas like this too around the city. You can be living in a 3 flat a block from a bunch of bars on a residential street and you can't actually hear the noise until you're maybe 100 feet from the corner for some reason.

I think people who have not experienced something like this would be shocked, honestly.
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