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Old 05-05-2013, 08:27 PM
 
Location: Fort Collins, USA
1,473 posts, read 2,367,422 times
Reputation: 1806

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
No matter how many people say they love their quiet suburb, some city person often comes on to complain about leaf blowers. I nor most of my neighbors have leaf blowers, and they are only a seasonal thing anyway, kind of like snowblowers in the winter, which, again, few of my neighbors nor I have. Do city lawns not get mown? What do you mean by "no noise insulation"? The urban legend that there are no trees in the suburbs?
When it comes to noise, leaf blowers and snowblowers are nothing compared to power mowers (because of the relative infrequency of use of the former). I'm certainly not saying that dense urban areas are quieter then suburbs, but nobody moves to a dense urban area for peace and quiet. If you really want quiet suburbs then you have to address the power mower issue.
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Old 05-05-2013, 08:30 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,985 posts, read 41,929,314 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
No matter how many people say they love their quiet suburb, some city person often comes on to complain about leaf blowers. I nor most of my neighbors have leaf blowers, and they are only a seasonal thing anyway, kind of like snowblowers in the winter, which, again, few of my neighbors nor I have.
At least leaf blower noise / power tool noise in my parent's nieghborhood is very frequent. Made worse by one neighbor in particular who has turned power tools into a personal hobby; my parents are tempted to complain. They do have one acre, which partly explains why the locals like power tools.

Quote:
Do city lawns not get mown?
Well if they're smaller, less to make noise. A small rake or hand powered mower might be sufficient. And also, the city neighborhoods I visit tend to be nearly lawnless or completely lawnless.
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Old 05-05-2013, 09:15 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,096,962 times
Reputation: 3117
Most of my neighbors and I use reel mowers. Nice and quiet, decent workout too.
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Old 05-06-2013, 06:54 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,881 posts, read 10,379,700 times
Reputation: 8050
Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Clean areas of Philly? Not very many, and only relatively; it isn't called Philthadelphia for nothing.
I'm guessing you've never spent time in any neighborhood in the entire Northwest section of the city. Look it up sometime; Chestnut Hill, East Falls, Andorra, Roxborough, Wissahickon, West Germantown, East/West Mount Airy. There are very few city neighborhoods cleaner and with better access to nature than Northwest Philadelphia.


https://maps.google.com/maps?q=chest...163.3,,0,-1.71 (East Falls)

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=chest...256.11,,0,5.43 (East Falls)

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=chest...1,53.9,,0,2.21 (West Mount Airy)

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=19118...,17.63,,0,9.05 (Chestnut Hill)

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=19118...,266.37,,0,0.3 (West Mount Airy)

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=19119...1,104.4,,0,0.3 (East Mount Airy)

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=19144...206.56,,0,3.32 (West Germantown)

Last edited by 2e1m5a; 05-06-2013 at 07:42 AM..
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Old 05-06-2013, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Bike to Surf!
3,080 posts, read 9,939,455 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redbacchus View Post
I used to think that big cities were the most awesome places on earth. You have neat shops, cool restaurants and bars, efficient public transportation, and lots of diversity.

But there's two things that I am growing to hate, the older I get. It's the dirtiness and all of the freaks that roam around big cities.
I never much cared for big cities until I went to Asia and visited the safe, ultra-dense, ultra-convenient, ultra-clean metropolises like Tokyo, Taipei, and Hong Kong.

I wouldn't want to live within the city limits of any US city I've visited. I do like some of the "suburbs" of Los Angeles that have their own downtowns and main streets. I used to think that was my ideal location; neare a town center, within range of the big city, but not immersed in it every day. However, now, if work and affordability will allow, I'll happily relocate to anywhere within the extent of the Taipei MRT system.

After visiting and living in the aformentioned Asian metropolises, I wonder why anyone would want to live in a place like dirty, overpriced NYC. Even though that city has gentrified over the past few years, the living spaces are still tiny, dirty, and run-down; now they just cost 5X more and your neighbors are likely to be rich double-income no-kids types. Certainly there are lots of civic events, parks, and green/mixed spaces popping up these days, adding some appeal to extremely social people. However, US cities just don't hold a candle to their more modern counterparts across the Pacific.
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Old 05-06-2013, 08:37 AM
 
Location: West Cedar Park, Philadelphia
1,225 posts, read 2,224,534 times
Reputation: 686
Here's the thing: Americans don't like cities, so they neglect them. Then they complain about how neglected our cities are. It's a self fulfilling prophecy. Go to any nation that genuinely cares about their urban areas and you'll see how clean and safe a city can be. It's also why places like Manhattan and Center City Philadelphia are so expensive to live in. There are so few livable urban areas left in the US that they command a huge premium to live in.
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Old 05-06-2013, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn New York
15,585 posts, read 24,992,689 times
Reputation: 20844
It is in age thing. When i started to work at 16, i worked in NYC, William Street to be exact. Worked many jobs throught the years, did the bars, clubs, shopping, the whole 9 yards, hanging with friends after work.

My sons now do this, i could care less if i ever went into NYC again.

been there, done that, totally over it.

NYC is a dirt disgusting city.
the last time i shopped in So-Ho, at broadway near Canal stret I could bot believe the amount of litter and debris all along the curbside, it was absolutely appauling.
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Old 05-06-2013, 01:42 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,252 posts, read 26,220,119 times
Reputation: 11706
I think most people are fine with most big cities until it's time to buy property. If you live in one of the cities on the Coasts, you'll likely find yourself immensely frustrated unless you've really just got it like that. For some people, the sacrifices they would have to make to live in the city get to be too much and they give up.
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Old 05-06-2013, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
5,522 posts, read 12,284,915 times
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I know several folks who raised their kids in the burbs then moved to downtown Chicago after their kids left home, so it works both ways.
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Old 05-06-2013, 02:31 PM
 
56,538 posts, read 80,824,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Of course. Anybody who's "been around" in the US and spent enough time in most cities, and outside of the central urban areas, knows that they all pretty much have many, many residential areas. Single family homes, yards, etc. They aren't one acre yards, but some neighborhoods definitely have yards big enough where it's going to take longer than 10 minutes to mow it all.

This notion that cities are one giant concrete jungle 100% of the area is just frivolous. NYC obviously has the most and other cities have it in large sections, but this notion that all US cities are almost all concrete jungle is just ridiculous. As for the noise pollution in cities - what you get depends on what part of town you are in. My girlfriend used to live in the North Center/Ravenswood part of town and every day waking up in the summer reminded me of where I grew up, which was a suburban neighborhood. I would hear kids playing every weekend morning and one person mowing their lawn in the distance. The only difference was that there was a CTA rail station a few blocks away (we'd almost never hear the train for the record) and it was mixed with single family homes, two and three flat buildings, and 10-20+ unit apartment/condo buildings. Very quiet though.
Very true and sometimes you can get variations in housing on the same side of town, like these North Side neighborhoods in Syracuse: Google Maps Street View

Google Maps Street View

Google Maps Street View

Google Maps Street View
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