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View Poll Results: Do you prefer newer cities or older cities
Newer Cities 16 21.05%
Older Cities 51 67.11%
No Preference 9 11.84%
Voters: 76. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-08-2013, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
3,178 posts, read 3,846,878 times
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Which do you prefer, newer cities (i.e. cities where most growth was post 1950), or older cities?

Personally, I prefer older cities because I feel they have more character, and a more established culture. I'm curious to hear other people's opinions, and reasons.
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Old 05-08-2013, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
654 posts, read 1,614,613 times
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I like new. I've only lived in places dominated by new housing. I like the new, modern, clean look of such places. My first exposure to older places was St Louis and Chicago. I really like Chicago but it is odd to me to see housing that doesn't have central heat and air or garbage disposals.
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Old 05-08-2013, 07:16 PM
 
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I like places with a small-enough scaled street grid to still be at least somewhat walkable--and so that usually means subdivision/layout from pre-1950. However, I find that it is possible for "historic" places to lose their character. It is common to hear such areas criticized for being "museums."

I like places that are still "funky," so I guess I prefer places that are "old" but not yet "historic."
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Old 05-08-2013, 07:35 PM
 
Location: In the heights
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Los Angeles is a nice middle ground. It started its boom prior to the 1950s and still has a decent amount to show for it while still trucking it post 1950s.

Personally, I prefer the pre 1950s ones, but a few decades from now maybe the post 1950s cities will have filled in quite nicely.
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Old 05-09-2013, 03:24 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Los Angeles is a nice middle ground. It started its boom prior to the 1950s and still has a decent amount to show for it while still trucking it post 1950s.

Personally, I prefer the pre 1950s ones, but a few decades from now maybe the post 1950s cities will have filled in quite nicely.
Yeah for me it has a lot more to do with when the streets were laid out than anything else. The northern LA basin's streets were almost all laid out prior to WWII, and the areas that date from the early 1900s are the most pleasant to walk/use. Downtown, Hollywood, Manhattan Beach, Venice, all have street grids from before 1920 and so reflect a city with less accommodation of the car. These are some of the nicest areas to walk--and in Manhattan Beach the majority of the buildings are from after 1950 but it still has that early 1900s street grid which really makes the city what it is.

Areas with much larger street grids, with cul-de-sacs, with superblocks with limited pass-through, etc are going to be very hard to "fill in" or introduce mixed uses.
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Old 05-09-2013, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Baltimore / Montgomery County, MD
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Older. You can't beat this:









All pics are D.C.
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Old 06-28-2015, 06:27 PM
 
26,160 posts, read 15,356,638 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleverfield
Personally, I prefer older cities because I feel they have more character, and a more established culture. I'm curious to hear other people's opinions, and reasons.
Yes and they were MADE BETTER also!! (I voted for OLDER)
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Old 07-01-2015, 04:26 AM
MPC
 
695 posts, read 987,874 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mahatma X View Post
Older. You can't beat this:









All pics are D.C.
Always loved them row houses. I think newer cities should revamp this idea. Nowadays it's all about mixed use, I get that but cities should throw in some new row houses to add some character to it.
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Old 07-01-2015, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Both, I love old architecure that is in a city not afraid to act new.
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Old 07-01-2015, 01:12 PM
 
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You might change your mind after a series of infrastructure problems associated with older cities (water main breaks, sever collapses, electrical arcing in underground feeders charging lamp poles and blowing manhole covers in the air, etc)

Residents of older cities are always upset with issues like these and think 'something should be done' but when presented with the cost, and the effect on utility bills or taxes always want someone else to pick up the tab.
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