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Old 05-10-2013, 11:59 AM
 
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I tried looking it up, but I don't really know what constitutes middle class in the Eurozone nor have I been to any major European cities, but I've been wondering this for a while. In Europe, you tend to have a lot more people renting compared to here in the states and people live closer to cities, but I don't know if the neighborhoods are mixed income of if they're like here where gentrification and anti-renter policies create clear class divisions in major cities.
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Old 05-10-2013, 12:54 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Well Europe generally has less income inequality, so it figures the cities naturally would, too. Here's data for Paris:

IAU - Cartographie Interactive

No income data I could find but click on "Liste des cartes" then "Population" underneath that Charctéristiques socio-économique de la population. There's two links Part des diplômés supérieur en 2007 (College degrees) and Part des non diplómés (no high school diploma?). Some of the outer parts of the Paris metro have almost no residents, check the density and population maps under Population. Note the actual city proper of Paris is a very small area in the center.

For London there's this map:

London LSOA Atlas

no income again but a variety of social indicators. Conveniently, the map's language is in English!
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Old 05-10-2013, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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This tells you the deviation from the mean income. As you can see, the Northeastern banlieue are much poorer than the rest of the region.

IAU - Cartographie Interactive

You want to select "revenus medians en 2009."
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Old 05-10-2013, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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They're about that life in Paris, too (or at least so they think).


BOOBA - Mauvais garcon - YouTube
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Old 05-10-2013, 01:40 PM
 
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Yes, why would you think they did not?
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Old 05-10-2013, 02:35 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
This tells you the deviation from the mean income. As you can see, the Northeastern banlieue are much poorer than the rest of the region.

IAU - Cartographie Interactive

You want to select "revenus medians en 2009."
I posted the same link, I couldn't find anything income-related. Where's "revenus median en 2009"?
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Old 05-10-2013, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Farnworth, Lancashire, England
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I can only speak for England - London has the largest disparities, it's a very expensive city and the rich are very rich and the poor can be very poor, when you travel to the smaller cities, particularly those in the North of England, where the cost of living is considerably lower, there tends to be a very high percentage of low to middle income familes, fewer rich people, small pockets of extreme deprivation but also many areas of mixed income neighbourhoods. Demographically, areas in the smaller cities tend to be very diverse, particularly those with traditional Victorian terraced (row) houses with, sometimes, a huge variation just between one block and the next.
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Old 05-10-2013, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I posted the same link, I couldn't find anything income-related. Where's "revenus median en 2009"?
Go the same place you described above. Then click on "Les revenus des francilliens en 2009 at leur evolution depuis 2000." It actually tells you what areas fall above or below the regional median income.
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Old 05-10-2013, 03:55 PM
 
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Thanks for the interactive maps. I'll spend some time playing around with them later.


And the reason I asked is because I often have friends who go places in Europe such as Paris or London as tourist or students abroad who kind of romanticize those cities(and Europe in general). When I make it a point to illustrate that income disparities in cities aren't unique to the US(as in many developing and Asian countries), they'll retort something along the lines of many middle income people live there when I don't think that's true given how it is in other cities. I've known for a while that London has seen its disparities growing and that Germany is very renter friendly(though that's been changing in recent years with rents increasing),but I wasn't exactly sure about other cities. Though I think I need to emphasize that I mean cities that attract a ton of tourists which is where these people go. I wouldn't believe for a second that cities like Amsterdam or Stockholm, which are outrageously expensive, could have a high population of middle income earners.
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Old 05-10-2013, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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Before or after wealth-transfers?

Gini coefficient measures inequality of a country rather than a city, but they're pretty alike. London has huge wealth discrepancies just as NYC does. Anyway, before taxes and the welfare state, the US isn't really very different form Europe. After taxes and welfare state, we're pretty far down there.

welfare spending as percentage of capita:
http://www.oecd.org/els/soc/socialex...tabasesocx.htm
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