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Old 07-29-2013, 11:54 PM
 
29 posts, read 52,730 times
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If they have traffic maps for roads wouldn't it be cool in the future to see how crowded a subway route is in New York?
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Old 08-01-2013, 11:29 PM
 
Location: Hoover, Alabama
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Yeah, like the Google Maps live traffic, that would be cool
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Old 08-02-2013, 07:38 AM
 
Location: New York City
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But what's the value besides being cool? Traffic maps allow drivers to choose an alternate route if a road is congested. On the subway you don't have that option.
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Old 08-02-2013, 07:44 AM
 
Location: The City
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Stopping Traffic: The Busiest NYC Subway Stops?

https://nycopendata.socrata.com/Tran...ions/arq3-7z49
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Old 08-02-2013, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Michigan
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NYC has that but for buses.

MTA Bus Time

Actually, a lot of cities are just now adapting GPS technology to their transit systems so that riders know where the buses (and possibly trains) are along the routes. Most of it meant for people to get alerts on their smart phones and such. So yea, it's probably pretty likely that this will become more common in the future.
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Old 08-02-2013, 04:40 PM
 
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More immediately useful would be a car "fullness" indicator at the station, so you know which car to shoot for. Saw it here
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Old 11-03-2013, 10:04 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tpk-nyc View Post
But what's the value besides being cool? Traffic maps allow drivers to choose an alternate route if a road is congested. On the subway you don't have that option.
Exactly my thoughts on the matter!
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Old 11-03-2013, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Planet Earth
3,853 posts, read 7,632,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tpk-nyc View Post
But what's the value besides being cool? Traffic maps allow drivers to choose an alternate route if a road is congested. On the subway you don't have that option.
Depends. In some cases, you might. (For instance, if you see that the IRT 7th Avenue Line is particularly overcrowded, you might be able to make your way over to the BMT Broadway Line).

Of course, there are lines like the Lexington Avenue Line that are known for their overcrowding, so it likely wouldn't tell you anything you don't already know.

Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
NYC has that but for buses.

MTA Bus Time

Actually, a lot of cities are just now adapting GPS technology to their transit systems so that riders know where the buses (and possibly trains) are along the routes. Most of it meant for people to get alerts on their smart phones and such. So yea, it's probably pretty likely that this will become more common in the future.
That's different.

The OP is asking about seeing how crowded the subway/bus line is. BusTime only shows how far away the next bus is. You might be able to infer which buses are likely to be less crowded (for instance, if there's a big gap, followed by 2 buses 2 blocks apart, you can infer that the first bus is likely to be more crowded than the second one, but it's not explicitly mentioned)

And right now, on most IRT lines, they have countdown clocks showing how far away the next train is. (In terms of minutes)
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Old 11-03-2013, 07:08 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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I could see this being useful if Toronto builds its downtown relief line. People from the East end would have the option to transfer onto the Yonge or relief subway to head South into the CBD and many would want to avoid the crowdedness of Yonge and the Yonge-Bloor transfer station.
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