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Old 09-02-2013, 10:42 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,252,153 times
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I was looking at Singapore on google maps, and one thing I noticed - well I've noticed this from visiting, is that, like most Asian cities but unlike most American or Australian ones, there's no pattern of built-density increasing as one goes into the centre and decreasing as you go outwards. There were detached houses or even bungalows near Orchard Road, and large swathes of HDB flats in outer areas like Jurong, Choa Chu Kang, Tampines and Hougang. Of course, American cities can't be as uniformly dense, but do you think we should encourage more density in the inner areas, or try to densify the transit corridors or designated regional centres?
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Old 09-02-2013, 11:21 PM
 
3,836 posts, read 4,716,650 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
I was looking at Singapore on google maps, and one thing I noticed - well I've noticed this from visiting, is that, like most Asian cities but unlike most American or Australian ones, there's no pattern of built-density increasing as one goes into the centre and decreasing as you go outwards. There were detached houses or even bungalows near Orchard Road, and large swathes of HDB flats in outer areas like Jurong, Choa Chu Kang, Tampines and Hougang. Of course, American cities can't be as uniformly dense, but do you think we should encourage more density in the inner areas, or try to densify the transit corridors or designated regional centres?
Yes, and
Yes

With few exceptions US cities are a sprawling mess. But to have a real impact on this you literally need to have density increasing everywhere. Of course, unthinking density terrible. It should be urban density, buildings that front active and complete streets, located on or near transit corridors. Just Cramming people into suburban dense complexes is the worst of all worlds.

The important distinction is that density is beneficial if its the right kind of density. Density is not the same thing as urbanism, though many if not most on here can't seem to get this distinction.
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Old 09-03-2013, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,115,862 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
I was looking at Singapore on google maps, and one thing I noticed - well I've noticed this from visiting, is that, like most Asian cities but unlike most American or Australian ones, there's no pattern of built-density increasing as one goes into the centre and decreasing as you go outwards. There were detached houses or even bungalows near Orchard Road, and large swathes of HDB flats in outer areas like Jurong, Choa Chu Kang, Tampines and Hougang. Of course, American cities can't be as uniformly dense, but do you think we should encourage more density in the inner areas, or try to densify the transit corridors or designated regional centres?
This also describes Los Angeles, which is routinely bashed by so-called "urbanistas" as not being a "real city". Personally I really like these sorts of cities, you can find vibrancy all over the city, not just in the CBD. Others prefer to know exactly where the action is happening and where it isn't.
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Old 09-03-2013, 10:35 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,989,613 times
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One of the most interesting short pieces on the subjects. In soviet russia, density increases as go away from the city center.

The economics of redevelopment and the shape of socialist cities | Market Urbanism
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Old 09-03-2013, 09:48 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
This also describes Los Angeles, which is routinely bashed by so-called "urbanistas" as not being a "real city". Personally I really like these sorts of cities, you can find vibrancy all over the city, not just in the CBD. Others prefer to know exactly where the action is happening and where it isn't.
Well yeah, LA is multinodal...in a way I think that actually makes it more interesting, since it spreads it around a bit and there are a variety of 'downtowns' instead of just one big one. Like if you like a beachy feel there's Santa Monica or Venice, for entertainment there's Weho and Hollywood, there's the downtown, Koreatown, Burbank.etc.
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Old 09-05-2013, 06:51 AM
 
1,653 posts, read 5,162,671 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
This also describes Los Angeles, which is routinely bashed by so-called "urbanistas" as not being a "real city". Personally I really like these sorts of cities, you can find vibrancy all over the city, not just in the CBD. Others prefer to know exactly where the action is happening and where it isn't.

I agree, but I think both types of cities can work. I will say that a place like LA, which has so many enclaves of activity is interetsing to explore and it's been my experience that people who live in places similiar to this understand and know their city/metro better.
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Old 09-07-2013, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
2,610 posts, read 3,763,081 times
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Los Angeles is a huge city though, so it can support multiple high activity centres, for smaller cities though it might be better to have just one or two centres. For most smaller American (and Canadian) cities, there's plenty of room for densification in the core areas (assuming they're zone appropriately), which are better set up to take advantage of densification than suburban areas.

Cities like Washington and Toronto it might make more sense to densify and urbanize some suburban areas because they're growing fast and much of the obvious targets for intensification (parking lots, brownfields, non descript 1 storey buildings) have already been developed, and their pre-WWII area make up a smaller share of the metro area compared to cities like NYC, Philadelphia or Cleveland.
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Old 09-07-2013, 02:08 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,013 posts, read 102,621,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
One of the most interesting short pieces on the subjects. In soviet russia, density increases as go away from the city center.

The economics of redevelopment and the shape of socialist cities | Market Urbanism
Soviet Russia (acutally, the USSR), now there's a role model!
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