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Old 09-27-2013, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Monmouth County, NJ & Staten Island, NY
407 posts, read 408,066 times
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So I thought based on a lot of the discussion on this forum lately and the examples people provide supporting whatever their viewpoint is, that this would be a neat idea: post Google Streetview links of streets/neighborhoods you'd most likely love to live in, as well as the ones you're least likely to enjoy. I'm going to say the top three most likely and top three least likely would be a good, substantial post but I suppose post (reasonably) however many you'd like. Sort of like "1) most ideal 2) second most ideal 3) third most ideal" followed by "1) least ideal 2) second least ideal 3) third least ideal".

They don't have to be streetscapes in the exact place you'd like to live, though that's fine. The idea is the design, density, character (or lack thereof), built form, transportation choices, socioeconomic factors/demographics, proximity, climate, local government, etc should be based on your opinion for the top 3 places you'd want to live in and the top 3 places you'd never want to live in.

This is all about opinion and personal tastes, since as we all know there is no shortage of opinionated and loaded arguments around here, as there should be. People are motivated by what they like and what works for them, and this is a chance for all to share it without having to be in a huge debate about what's better. Let's try and leave the city vs. suburb, urban vs. rural vs. suburban, farm country vs. Manhattan, McMansion vs. Soviet-era high rise, light rail vs. expressway arguments out of here and both respect and appreciate our own personal choices and preferences. I don't know how well this will actually pan out, but hopefully everyone will play nice because the intention of this thread isn't to spur debate, but rather get an idea of what your fellow commenters really want in a community rather than spitting vitriolic hyperbole back and forth. Additionally, this can be realistic or semi-realistic, as in this is a place you're working towards living in within a reasonable timeframe, or this is where you'd like to be "when I'm rich", or hypothetically speaking in 10-20 years of working/raises/promotions ideally where you'd like to end up.


So I'll start it off with my most ideal, starting with the third most ideal:

http://goo.gl/maps/kqXMC

My current neighborhood in Staten Island, NY. A suburban-style neighborhood in New York City, I do have a special feeling for it because I grew up here and it's the only kind of neighborhood I've really ever lived in. My main issues lately have been with the very high cost of living in NYC as prices and costs go up, along with the relative cost of real estate for a SFH compared to New Jersey and elsewhere. Also, rising population and overall increasing density are contributing negative factors pushing me further away from living here.


Second most ideal:

http://goo.gl/maps/4xXtA

Suburban neighborhood Old Bridge, NJ. Much less density in this more traditional 1950s+ SFH neighborhood, which I find to be much more comfortable and better in line with my tastes. Day to day necessities and activities are only a short drive away, along with highways & mass transit access to major regional job centers. Property taxes can be pretty high in this area, but that's the price you pay to have this kind of neighborhood in a good area within the NYC region.

Most Ideal Neighborhood I'd like to live in:

http://goo.gl/maps/msAZG

Not specific to this location, but I picked this beautiful tree-lined suburban/exurban street in Southampton, Pennsylvania ~25 miles north of Center City Philly however similar neighborhoods could be found within reasonable commuting distance of Manhattan or other regional employment centers. I love the particular style of these homes, the landscaping, lot size and plentiful driveway space/garages. It provides a nice compromise on plenty of personal property and still has a community feel where you're not necessarily alienated from your neighbors. This of course depends block by block, as there have been many discussions about neighborhoods like this not being conducive to socialization with neighbors, etc. Personally in my experience, I find that to be a crock of sh*t lol, as I've been to tons of similar neighborhoods which have always had plenty of people outside socializing, kids playing in the street, BBQs and block parties just to name a few. Also nice because it's only a short drive from plenty of retail, amenities, highways and even mass transit should I need it.

My third least ideal neighborhood:

http://goo.gl/maps/m95Gp

New Urbanist-style community in Robbinsville, NJ. The homes are way too close together for my liking, I'm not a fan of the styling on most of the homes, and I absolutely hate the fact that there are no driveways in the front with backyard-ruining alley driveway access. It's also not even worth having this much density as there really aren't too many things to walk to in the little "downtown" area they built. There's a huge shopping plaza they built a few miles away which you would need a car for so I don't even see the point, maybe if they built it a little closer to that...but either way, no thanks.

My second least ideal neighborhood:

http://goo.gl/maps/xEByh

East Flatbush, Brooklyn, NY...this is just an example, as neighborhoods like this can be found all over the NYC area (including several parts of NJ) and other cities elsewhere. Way too dense for my liking, potentially little to no private parking (or a cramped driveway), no breathing room IMO, annoying street parking (and alternate side parking rules). It has good transit access and its definitely walkable for those who want that kind of life, but living somewhere like this and wanting to use your car as a primary mode of transportation can be much more of a hassle compared to places like my former example. I'm basing this on some anecdotal evidence along with some obvious facts about it such as limited highways, excessive traffic lights, lots of pedestrians, poor (or nonexistent) private parking and mediocre at best street parking depending on the area. Not for me, I can see the appeal for many though.

My least ideal neighborhood I'd not want to live in:

http://goo.gl/maps/5xBDG

Upper West Side, New York, NY (though it could be anywhere in the super-dense parts of NYC or another city). Don't get me wrong, some of these neighborhoods (including the West End Av link above) are beautiful and I visit them quite often for whatever the reason may be. When it comes to actually living there, absolutely no thanks. Getting into why is quite obvious given my ideal desirable examples, one could see why I wouldn't want to live here. Practically impossible street parking over a long period of time, expensive (and inconvenient IMO) off-street parking, too crowded, too dense, having to walk or take transit to accomplish most errands is just not my cup of tea. One could argue that its not so bad in terms of open space and breathing room because Central Park is only a few blocks away, however the overall neighborhood itself is just too much for me. That said I can definitely see the appeal of it and I'm glad that it exists to make many people happy who prefer that lifestyle, because we really do have so many choices as I want to folks to show in this thread.

Happy posting!!
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Old 09-27-2013, 06:37 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,026,386 times
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Fun thread idea.

Choice of Old Bridge is a bit ironic for me. I have a good friend who grew up there. Didn't care for it much, and did hate the lack of walkability. Biggest reason he cared was he never had a car the times he lived there (high school and short times post-college). Even now, my perspective of suburbia is colored by not having a car.
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Old 09-27-2013, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,446 posts, read 11,948,134 times
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I suppose it will be easier if I post things within Pittsburgh proper. I'm going to go with just showing blocks rather than the whole shebang.

Favorites:

3. Honestly the best block in the city. Sadly the area has no business district to speak of, so aside from some beautiful houses it offers little.

2. Friendship Park area of Bloomfield. A great location in a walkable area. A bit too much yard for me though.

1. Lawrenceville. My current hood, but not my current street. I'm too poor to afford this area now methinks.

Least favorite.

3. Stanton Heights. Ugly, exclusively residential, unwalkable. At least it's in a convenient part of the city though.

2. Summer Hill. Classic suburb in the city.

3. Allegheny Center. At one point this was the heart of the Northside of Pittsburgh. It got its heart ripped out through urban renewal in the 1950s (over 500 buildings, mostly 19th century, were demolished), and stands as a testament to everything wrong with urban planning in its day, from the one way loop streets to the giant scale ugly single-use buildings. At least they left the theatre and a few churches standing.
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Old 09-27-2013, 06:42 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,026,386 times
Reputation: 14811
Quote:
Originally Posted by KeepRightPassLeft View Post
Let's try and leave the city vs. suburb, urban vs. rural vs. suburban, farm country vs. Manhattan, McMansion vs. Soviet-era high rise, light rail vs. expressway arguments out of here and both respect and appreciate our own personal choices and preferences.
But what happens is if your ideal streetscape has Soviet style high rises? Like this...





Someone loves them. You know who you are. Also, are non-North American views allowed? Will post later.
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Old 09-27-2013, 07:00 PM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,854,178 times
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Least Favorite:
http://goo.gl/maps/UMGzV

Most Favorite (actually I'd prefer being on the little lakes nearby, but the Street View car hasn't been there)
http://goo.gl/maps/kAbQ7
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Old 09-28-2013, 07:33 PM
 
Location: NYntarctica
11,438 posts, read 6,419,116 times
Reputation: 4340
Perfect: Moderately dense, wide streets, trees, focus on architectural beauty, and of course, public transportation

https://maps.google.com/maps?safe=of...ed=0CCwQ8gEwAA

https://maps.google.com/maps?safe=of...ed=0CCkQ8gEwAA

Good: Very good structure, moderate density. The only downside is the lack of public transportation

https://maps.google.com/maps?safe=of...ed=0CCkQ8gEwAA

Mediocre: Low density, no public transportation, one-floor houses, etc. The only positive is the tree-lined streets

https://maps.google.com/maps?safe=of...ed=0CCkQ8gEwAA

https://maps.google.com/maps?safe=of...ed=0CCkQ8gEwAA

Awful: Barely any trees, nil public transportation, strip malls, etc.

https://maps.google.com/maps?safe=of...ed=0CCkQ8gEwAA

https://maps.google.com/maps?safe=of...ed=0CCkQ8gEwAA

Last edited by nei; 09-29-2013 at 10:11 AM..
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Old 09-29-2013, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Richmond/Philadelphia/Brooklyn
1,263 posts, read 1,274,537 times
Reputation: 741
It's A tie! for most ideal

http://goo.gl/maps/zTgHn

http://goo.gl/maps/RRBKK

http://goo.gl/maps/LQFL9

http://goo.gl/maps/uBk0L

and for least ideal

http://goo.gl/maps/0ZIWf

Last edited by pantin23; 09-29-2013 at 09:46 AM..
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Old 09-29-2013, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,896 posts, read 7,664,847 times
Reputation: 4508
I like this thread!

If I won the lottery, and decided to retire abroad, I'd probably move to Florence, Italy. This particular intersection intrigued me when I visited, back in college.
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Flore...42.21,,0,-7.39
I could envision spending many balmy evenings relaxing under that loggia, watching people walk by.

OK, back to reality. If I move from Youngstown, I'll probably move to this neighborhood in Cleveland.
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Ohio+...,58.57,,0,-5.7
This neighborhood is one train stop away from downtown, has its own business district a few blocks away on W. 25th, and has one of the finest markets in the U.S. (The West Side Market: Cleveland's oldest publicly owned market)

This is my current neighborhood in Youngstown: (although my house is on the park, I actually prefer this street)
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Wick+...,70.3,,0,-1.46
While I really like the architecture in this neighborhood, it ranks lowest because: there is little effort to preserve it, mass-transit is limited, (one bus every half-hour) and the nearby commercial district is weak. (though slowly improving)

Here is sort of a wildcard:
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Navar...2.01,,0,-10.53
I'd have to retire to a place like this. It's on the outskirts of a small town, and has no mass-transit, though it's not too difficult to walk to town. I've always liked this old house, and wouldn't mind spending my retirement (assuming I'm in good health) restoring it.

Now here are some examples of what I find least desirable from the township where I grew up.

3rd least desirable:
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Perry...17.28,,0,-4.48
There are some sidewalks, but there's almost nothing to walk to. My high school is in one direction, and the commercial strip (with car dealerships, auto service centers, etc.) in the other. A bus does run up and down the commercial strip. (every half-hour, in opposite directions) Also, the variety of 1920's-1950's houses keeps it from being less desirable.

2nd least desirable. I lived in this neighborhood for 4 years as a kid.
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Perry...28.32,,0,-3.69
It is miles away from anything except a 7-eleven, and an elementary school. (it would still be difficult to walk to either from here, though) I also dislike the bland, 1960's-70's architecture.

And here is my #1 least favorite. I also lived in this neighborhood for for a few years as a kid.
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Perry...356.75,,0,0.78
It has all of the drawbacks of #2, but is also close to a 4 lane highway, and has these dirt-cheap duplexes.
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Old 09-29-2013, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Richmond/Philadelphia/Brooklyn
1,263 posts, read 1,274,537 times
Reputation: 741
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I suppose it will be easier if I post things within Pittsburgh proper. I'm going to go with just showing blocks rather than the whole shebang.

Favorites:

3. Honestly the best block in the city. Sadly the area has no business district to speak of, so aside from some beautiful houses it offers little.

2. Friendship Park area of Bloomfield. A great location in a walkable area. A bit too much yard for me though.

1. Lawrenceville. My current hood, but not my current street. I'm too poor to afford this area now methinks.
.
WOW You just showed EXACTLY my favorite streets of Pittsburgh!!!
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Old 09-29-2013, 09:54 AM
 
Location: NYntarctica
11,438 posts, read 6,419,116 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pantin23 View Post
Love the first four!

The last one isn't too bad, at least there are sidewalks (a lot of places don't even have those), but yeah, it's still pretty boring
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