U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-23-2013, 02:37 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,889,790 times
Reputation: 1290

Advertisements

Is it just me, or does it feel like small towns and smaller populated areas are losing jobs while more urban areas are growing with jobs? In my area, one of the biggest employers was a correctional facility and once it closed, there was just a void. Sometime in the distant future they plan to turn it into a second high school, but that's far off. I also don't see small towns adding jobs. I know in some small town areas a factory will shut down and a gap in the job market remains. I feel more and more people living in more rural areas are having to commute to the urban areas for jobs.

It seems to me like certain cities are keeping the job growth and now in some areas the jobs are expanding into suburbs. For example, Menlo Park getting Apple's headquarters and seeing that there are now more jobs in San Jose's suburbs.

I also wonder what will happen with cities like Stockton and areas like Hollister where traffic becomes a nightmare as these areas have a declining job market and pushes people to commute into the Bay for work.

I think it's smart that we start placing more job centers in the burbs, so that in hopes people in small towns and rural areas commute to the burbs for work instead of job centers in the city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-23-2013, 03:03 PM
 
56,593 posts, read 80,870,855 times
Reputation: 12500
It depends on the small town. There are actually companies based in or that have jobs in small towns, but you have to know where to look. Here's an example here in Upstate NY: Greene, New York: City and Village Government
Greene, New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Current Employment Opportunities - The Raymond Corporation

Here's another one: Seneca Falls, NY - Historic Gateway to the Finger Lakes
Seneca Falls, New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
ITT jobs in Seneca Falls, NY - Indeed Mobile
- ITT Industrial Process Careers


Some places may have more jobs than others, but you can find such places.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2013, 04:16 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
Reputation: 14805
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
It depends on the small town. There are actually companies based in or that have jobs in small towns, but you have to know where to look.
That's not the same as job growth, though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2013, 04:36 PM
 
56,593 posts, read 80,870,855 times
Reputation: 12500
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
That's not the same as job growth, though.
Well, the original post touched on many issues and I guess I was addressing the loss of jobs from small towns.

I don't know if making suburbs job centers is the way to go in relation to were the population is centered in most metros.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2013, 12:09 AM
 
Location: Ak-Rowdy, OH
1,522 posts, read 2,483,403 times
Reputation: 1121
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Well, the original post touched on many issues and I guess I was addressing the loss of jobs from small towns.

I don't know if making suburbs job centers is the way to go in relation to were the population is centered in most metros.
Perpetuating sprawl, more like.

I think when employment was more stable it was feasible for small towns to be a center of employment. But now, if you pick any given small town, what is there, one or two major employers? And if this small town isn't in a convenient commuting range to a larger area and you as an employee get laid off, or the company shuts down, then what? You have to pack your bags whether you want to or not. People no longer have 30 year tenures at a company. Companies no longer have 150 year tenures in a town.

That kind of economic isolation is problematic, in my opinion. It's trouble enough to hunt down employment even in large metro areas. While some people don't mind uprooting themselves and their families every 3 or 4 or 5 years, many people do mind, and I think that makes it hard in small towns.

And now, with the massive amount of media and the access to the Internet, it just exacerbates other issues. What if you have a special interest, or are gay, or any of the other numerous things that can arise? the Internet makes you very aware of what is available... somewhere.

There will always be people that prefer that kind of environment but I do think it is daunting, particularly those who desire the traditional employer-employee relationship.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2013, 01:20 AM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,889,790 times
Reputation: 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquareBetterThanAll View Post
Perpetuating sprawl, more like.

I think when employment was more stable it was feasible for small towns to be a center of employment. But now, if you pick any given small town, what is there, one or two major employers? And if this small town isn't in a convenient commuting range to a larger area and you as an employee get laid off, or the company shuts down, then what? You have to pack your bags whether you want to or not. People no longer have 30 year tenures at a company. Companies no longer have 150 year tenures in a town.

That kind of economic isolation is problematic, in my opinion. It's trouble enough to hunt down employment even in large metro areas. While some people don't mind uprooting themselves and their families every 3 or 4 or 5 years, many people do mind, and I think that makes it hard in small towns.

And now, with the massive amount of media and the access to the Internet, it just exacerbates other issues. What if you have a special interest, or are gay, or any of the other numerous things that can arise? the Internet makes you very aware of what is available... somewhere.

There will always be people that prefer that kind of environment but I do think it is daunting, particularly those who desire the traditional employer-employee relationship.
good point, employment in a city is probably more stable than small town employment. if small town gov jobs bare more cuts than a larger city cut.

one example, is if a small town loses a large employer, you can't go anywhere else for a job because of the isolation. in a metro area, you can go the neighboring areas for another employer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2013, 05:53 PM
 
12,299 posts, read 15,190,901 times
Reputation: 8108
From what I hear, North Dakota, driven by oil exploration. Of course it will collapse when oil prices do or all the oil has been tapped.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2013, 07:07 PM
 
56,593 posts, read 80,870,855 times
Reputation: 12500
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquareBetterThanAll View Post
Perpetuating sprawl, more like.

I think when employment was more stable it was feasible for small towns to be a center of employment. But now, if you pick any given small town, what is there, one or two major employers? And if this small town isn't in a convenient commuting range to a larger area and you as an employee get laid off, or the company shuts down, then what? You have to pack your bags whether you want to or not. People no longer have 30 year tenures at a company. Companies no longer have 150 year tenures in a town.

That kind of economic isolation is problematic, in my opinion. It's trouble enough to hunt down employment even in large metro areas. While some people don't mind uprooting themselves and their families every 3 or 4 or 5 years, many people do mind, and I think that makes it hard in small towns.

And now, with the massive amount of media and the access to the Internet, it just exacerbates other issues. What if you have a special interest, or are gay, or any of the other numerous things that can arise? the Internet makes you very aware of what is available... somewhere.

There will always be people that prefer that kind of environment but I do think it is daunting, particularly those who desire the traditional employer-employee relationship.
Exactly....Luckily for the small towns I mentioned, they are within 30-40 minutes of a metro area. So, if those companies decide to leave, then you can still have a reasonable commute to job centers. I think such small towns are the way to go, just in case.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-29-2013, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,699 posts, read 8,488,284 times
Reputation: 4883
In my experience, small towns come in different flavours depending on the economy, and frankly for the reasons mentioned I think alot of them will continue to decline because there's more of them then make sense for the modern economy. If people in them can feasibly commute to suburbs for work, that's fine, but really that means they're functioning economically more as exurbs of a metro rather then independent small towns. The vast majority of small towns aren't that close to a city, so they don't have that option. These towns should ideally either be transient centres like resource extraction centres where most people know they're just coming in to work temporarily and don't put down too many roots, agricultural/fishing centres that are going to be fairly stable because people always need to eat, or specialized places like artist colonies or tourism towns, which can depend on roughly consistent income because the people there aren't dependent on one or two big employers who can sink the whole place by going under.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-30-2013, 12:51 AM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,889,790 times
Reputation: 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
In my experience, small towns come in different flavours depending on the economy, and frankly for the reasons mentioned I think alot of them will continue to decline because there's more of them then make sense for the modern economy. If people in them can feasibly commute to suburbs for work, that's fine, but really that means they're functioning economically more as exurbs of a metro rather then independent small towns. The vast majority of small towns aren't that close to a city, so they don't have that option. These towns should ideally either be transient centres like resource extraction centres where most people know they're just coming in to work temporarily and don't put down too many roots, agricultural/fishing centres that are going to be fairly stable because people always need to eat, or specialized places like artist colonies or tourism towns, which can depend on roughly consistent income because the people there aren't dependent on one or two big employers who can sink the whole place by going under.
I'm curious, did any of the gulf coast towns go under after the oil spill? Since some towns, like mine, function solely on tourism. That's why CA won't ever risk oil drilling off our coast because some towns could go under if they loss tourism.

Small towns are always at a risk if they put all their eggs on one or two large employers. what if a nasty drought happens and the farms can't survive?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top