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Old 11-03-2013, 12:12 AM
 
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Right now Germany is the fourth largest economy in the world and the largest economy in Europe but compared to other countries it has no major global city like how London is to Britain, Paris is to France, Tokyo is to Japan, etc. It's a country of just a collection of semi-large cities that all supply each other rather than one city being considered a major global city. I know it's like this since Germany wasn't reunited until a hundred years ago or so and before that it was just a collection of city-states like Italy; but now since it's been reunited for the last twenty years do you think in the future one city will grow faster than rest and become the next Paris or London of Germany?
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Old 11-03-2013, 01:10 AM
 
Location: SoCal
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Originally Posted by BAA17 View Post
Right now Germany is the fourth largest economy in the world and the largest economy in Europe but compared to other countries it has no major global city like how London is to Britain, Paris is to France, Tokyo is to Japan, etc. It's a country of just a collection of semi-large cities that all supply each other rather than one city being considered a major global city. I know it's like this since Germany wasn't reunited until a hundred years ago or so and before that it was just a collection of city-states like Italy; but now since it's been reunited for the last twenty years do you think in the future one city will grow faster than rest and become the next Paris or London of Germany?
Actually, Paris itself has less of a population than Berlin. Thus, perhaps Berlin and/or some of the cities in the Rhineland (Ruhr) can become a future (de facto and/or de jure) German mega-city.
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Old 11-03-2013, 03:49 AM
 
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It is because the City of Paris has a very small city limits but if you include suburbs, Paris is much larger than Berlin.
It makes no sense to compare city limits.
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Old 11-03-2013, 07:17 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Odd thing is by urban area, the "Ruhr Area" has a slightly higher population than Berlin. A bunch of mid-sized neighboring cities add to larger than one big one. Haven't been to Germany, but I'd assume Berlin feels like a bigger city than the Ruhr Area.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larger_..._by_population
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Old 11-03-2013, 07:20 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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It'd be interesting to compare the European list with American ones.

List of United States urban areas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Do the American ones follow the same distribution? The US seems to have larger ones. The density numbers on the LUZ must include undeveloped land, there's no way Paris is less dense than Chicago.
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Old 11-03-2013, 09:08 AM
 
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LUZ are metropolitan areas, not urban.
This explains the low density.
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Old 11-03-2013, 10:45 AM
 
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IMO, a powerful country over time will develop a central global city rather than a collection of medium sized cities that Germany has today. But what I want to know from others is what metro area is going to be the next Paris or London of Germany. IMO, I would either say Berlin or Frankfurt.
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Old 11-03-2013, 10:56 AM
 
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Well, you have to keep in mind that Germany displayed some rather upsetting behavior during the first half of the 20th century, resulting in some rather energetic "urban renewal" in its cities, and then for most of the second half of the 20th Century was split into two countries, which may have had an effect on urban development.
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Old 11-03-2013, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Saint Louis, MO
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
Odd thing is by urban area, the "Ruhr Area" has a slightly higher population than Berlin. A bunch of mid-sized neighboring cities add to larger than one big one. Haven't been to Germany, but I'd assume Berlin feels like a bigger city than the Ruhr Area.

Larger Urban Zone - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
My husband used to live in the Ruhr region. The Ruhr region has more of a rust-belt, industrial vibe. However, Düsseldorf and Köln/Cologne are so nearby that I often think of them collectively (considered the Rhine-Ruhr metropolitan region in Germany). Most of my husband's co-workers lived in one region and commuted to various other regions for work throughout their careers. Each city is well connected by public transportation. At the same time, each city has its own identity in a way. Many have their own soccer teams, own transit systems, etc.

Berlin feels far more like what you would expect a major destination city to feel like, and its much more interesting for tourists.
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Old 11-03-2013, 03:40 PM
 
Location: inside your head
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As far as I know, the Germans actually preserve this "no-major-city-rule". Although it's been over 20 years since Germany reunited, some ministries still reside in Bonn and other federal institutions (like Supreme Court) are spread across the country.

I think it is actually quite a good idea. Some European countries tend to have one big capital and all other major cities are not even close to the capital by size and importance. In France there is huge Paris and the second-largest city, Lyon is somehow provincial. In the UK, there is London and then... well, what's exactly then? I know there is Manchester, Liverpool, Glasgow etc. but none of this cities is a world-class city. Not to mention Irish case, where there is Dublin and literally nothing more.
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