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Old 12-21-2013, 06:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Look at
5th Ave in NY
Michigan Ave in Chicago
Boylston in Boston
Rodeo Dr in LA
How different are they?

If those examples are similar, then you're saying that all suburbs are similar.
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Old 12-21-2013, 07:00 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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I know suburbs are not the same. There is great variance of suburbs within single metro areas. If you're comparing suburbs between two or more metro areas, each suburb may have a 'counterpart' in another metro, but no two suburbs are really the same.
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Old 12-21-2013, 07:37 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,985 posts, read 41,929,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Look at
5th Ave in NY
Michigan Ave in Chicago
Boylston in Boston
Rodeo Dr in LA
How different are they?
Each is distinctive, but Rodeo Dr has little in common with the other four in style.
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Old 12-21-2013, 08:26 PM
 
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depends on if its a black suburb or a white suburb
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Old 12-21-2013, 10:04 PM
 
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No, not all suburbs are the same. First it depends on how you define suburb - and that will vary by what part of the country you are from.

Suburbs vary from region to region and they vary by decade built.

In Philadelphia most people would consider anything outside of the city of Philadelphia and Camden to be "the suburbs" even though neighborhoods of rowhouses and twins can be found in every suburban county. Some people in the city will also consider the leafier parts of Northeast and Northwest Philly "suburban" in character or function even though when they say "out in the suburbs" you can be pretty sure they're not referring to anywhere within the city limits.

In the Philadelphia suburbs we have towns that were founded from the mid-1600s to the mid-1700s. Places like Haddonfield, Doylestown, Phoenixville, etc are very much walkable towns and the suburbs are full of places like that. Then there are the places that were built from the 1880s to 1920s (the streetcar era) that are still just as walkable but not quite as cramped as the older towns. Then you have the suburbs built from the late 40's through to the early 60s. Smaller houses, small lots. Definitely auto-oriented but not on such a massive scale that you couldn't walk anywhere if you wanted to. Then came the houses from the late 60s to late 70s. Slightly larger houses, slightly larger lots, slightly more isolated.

In the 80s house sizes made a big leap, available land for new development was at this point farther from the established towns and from the city but also cheaper, most of the freeway construction of the 60s and 70s was finished. The 90s took this a step further. Larger houses, larger lots, further from employment.

It's this latter part - subdivisions from the 80s on that are virtually identical (and in fact often built by the same developers) from suburban Maryland, through Pennsylvania, up to western NY. Regional styles in Southern California, Florida, New England are going to be different from each other but if you're comparing a suburb in Buffalo to one in Pittsburgh from the same decade I think you're going to find more similarities than differences.

So to answer the OP, No. Suburbs aren't all the same. They vary by decade and by region but within the same decade and the same region they're mostly similar.
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Old 12-22-2013, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Chandler, AZ
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The answer is unequivocally no, because some cities have much newer suburbs which consequently look a lot better than cities which aren't; Chicago's suburbs are dramatically different from those out here in LA, and you can definitely say the same things about tons of pairs of cities from coast to coast, including everything from types of vehicles in the respective driveways to housing designs and too many other things to count.
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Old 12-22-2013, 10:16 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marv101 View Post
The answer is unequivocally no, because some cities have much newer suburbs which consequently look a lot better than cities which aren't;
really? I thought newer ones often look worse. Perhaps it's a taste thing.
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Old 12-22-2013, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Long Neck,De
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No !! Different suburbs,different neighborhoods... Notice the word different there.
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Old 12-22-2013, 02:12 PM
 
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Only to those who never leave Center City. In regions fortunate enough to have had commuter rail for the last hundred years (not just in the last 20) there are the railroad suburbs. There are the mall suburbs, the corporate suburbs, Country-club suburbs, equestrian suburbs, planned communities, and I'm just getting started. Even the government differs. Most are incorporated cities or villages, some are unincorporated but governed by homeowner associations.
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Old 12-22-2013, 02:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glamatomic View Post
I know suburbs are not the same. There is great variance of suburbs within single metro areas. If you're comparing suburbs between two or more metro areas, each suburb may have a 'counterpart' in another metro, but no two suburbs are really the same.
Yes, every suburb and small town has its very own vibe. No two people are psychologically identical, even twins, and neither are towns.
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