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Old 12-23-2013, 04:19 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
look at all that parking (Andover MA)
or here

(West Hartford, CT)

(Clayton, MO)

Ya, all suburbs are subdivisions and stripmalls.
None are post-war auto-dependent suburbs - I was pretty clear in my post if you care to reread it.
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Old 12-23-2013, 04:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Except all three locations are in the south, so that's not that surprising. Go out to California, the Northeast and perhaps the Midwest and you'll notice regional differences.
Nor are the post-war suburbs in Atlanta much different in form than the suburbs in San Diego or Salt Lake City or Seattle or Virginia. What differences there are are fairly superficial (different facades or choice of materials) - the forms of suburbs are remarkably consistent across the US.
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Old 12-23-2013, 04:42 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
Nor are the post-war suburbs in Atlanta much different in form than the suburbs in San Diego or Salt Lake City or Seattle or Virginia. What differences there are are fairly superficial (different facades or choice of materials) - the forms of suburbs are remarkably consistent across the US.
California suburbs are much denser than southern ones for one. Atlanta suburbs often lack sidewalks, Califonian ones rarely lack them.
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Old 12-23-2013, 05:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
None of your images are postwar suburbs.
Andover, MA 1940- 11,100; 2010- 33,301, 3x Larger, West Hartford Doubled in size since 1940. they are post-war boom towns.
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Old 12-23-2013, 05:17 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,967,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Andover, MA 1940- 11,100; 2010- 33,301, 3x Larger, West Hartford Doubled in size since 1940. they are post-war boom towns.
I'd be surprised if the photos you showed weren't in an older, pre-1940 part of town. But the section supports more recently built sections.
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Old 12-23-2013, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
California suburbs are much denser than southern ones for one. Atlanta suburbs often lack sidewalks, Califonian ones rarely lack them.
Yeah, not only that, suburbs within California are wildly different. Suburbs within Sacramento are wildly different. Orangevale looks very little like Elk Grove. Even within a suburb, they differ based on the time period they were built and from neighborhood to neighborhood even when built in the same rough time period. It's slightly less ignorant than saying that all parts of cities built in the post-war period look the same, but not really that much less.
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Old 12-23-2013, 06:30 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
California suburbs are much denser than southern ones for one. Atlanta suburbs often lack sidewalks, Califonian ones rarely lack them.
Salt Lake City suburbs also generally have sidewalks.
https://maps.google.com/maps?oe=utf-...&ved=0CLUBELYD
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Old 12-24-2013, 03:52 PM
 
56,609 posts, read 80,910,543 times
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Isn't Provo-Orem its own metro?

As for suburbs being the same, simply no. Here are examples of suburban neighborhoods in the same school district: https://maps.gstatic.com/m/streetvie...cbp=0,270,,0,0

https://maps.gstatic.com/m/streetvie...A&cbp=0,0,,0,0

https://maps.gstatic.com/m/streetvie...A&cbp=0,0,,0,0

https://maps.gstatic.com/m/streetvie...894286136,,0,0

https://maps.gstatic.com/m/streetvie...534541643,,0,0
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Old 12-24-2013, 04:17 PM
 
12,299 posts, read 15,194,052 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
There are only so many styles of houses, floor plans, etc that can be built. Bungalows are distributed throughout the midwest, west and west coast, for example. Two stories and ranches are everywhere.

Every now and then some fad comes along, like the gawd-awful (IMO) "raised ranches/bilevels" (depending on your part of the country). I think they look sawed off, and a friend who had one said you basically have two ranch houses, instead of there being any type of "flow". Some of the "contemporary" houses that were built in my neighborhood in the 80s are weird, too, with kitchens facing the street, very strange room arrangements, etc.

But I digress. To a point, yes, suburbs are going to look alike just like cities do. But, as pvande55 (among others) pointed out, there are various types of suburbs. Some other types that s/he did not mention are burbs that were once small towns (usually farm towns), and college towns near big cities (Boulder, CO comes to mind), and lots more.
Well, of course I couldn't list all types of suburb. Many of the former small-town suburbs still refuse to acknowledge they are now such. I purposely ignored industrial suburbs because their residential areas are very similar to many central cities.
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Old 12-24-2013, 07:36 PM
 
Location: Richmond/Philadelphia/Brooklyn
1,263 posts, read 1,273,092 times
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No necessarity, although they are alot more hideous, and boring lo look at, be in, etc
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