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Old 12-24-2013, 10:51 PM
 
Location: NYntarctica
11,472 posts, read 6,570,504 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Look at
5th Ave in NY
Michigan Ave in Chicago
Boylston in Boston
Rodeo Dr in LA
How different are they?
Are you serious, bro?

Completely different atmospheres. Rodeo Dr is lined with palm trees and there are exotic cars parked on the sides. Boylston Street has classic New England architecture. Michigan Avenue is lined with modern skyscrapers. 5th Avenue is full of Art Deco architecture and skyscrapers.

Now try comparing Chandler AZ to Amityville NY to Secaucus NJ to Laramie WY. The only difference is that one of these places is famous for ghosts, otherwise they're all the same
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Old 12-25-2013, 07:05 AM
 
Location: Richmond/Philadelphia/Brooklyn
1,263 posts, read 1,288,669 times
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^^ owned!!!
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Old 12-25-2013, 10:57 AM
 
9,558 posts, read 15,088,521 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warszawa View Post
Now try comparing Chandler AZ to Amityville NY to Secaucus NJ to Laramie WY. The only difference is that one of these places is famous for ghosts, otherwise they're all the same
ROTFL. Yeah, I could never distinguish a green landscaped large-lot subdivision with large setbacks and various multi-story houses from a xeriscaped small-lot subdivision with single-story houses. Nor either one from a green small-setback area with multi-story houses in a town that's half industrial.

(I hope you were being sarcastic!)
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Old 12-26-2013, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,214 posts, read 16,358,058 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
ROTFL. Yeah, I could never distinguish a green landscaped large-lot subdivision with large setbacks and various multi-story houses from a xeriscaped small-lot subdivision with single-story houses. Nor either one from a green small-setback area with multi-story houses in a town that's half industrial.

(I hope you were being sarcastic!)
I think we're having the who is the least capable of observing our surroundings while buried in our iPhone competition myself. Not something I'd be proud to partake in, let alone excel at myself, but whatever. I guess some people think its a badge of pride to not be able to be so oblivious. Badge of pride that you're so ignorant about something you dislike or something, I guess. "Look, I hate the tax chattels so much I'm ignorant enough to think they all look the same" badge of urbanista pride? And the opposite as well. San Francisco and New York are definitely distinct. Even San Francisco is distinct. Large parts of it don't really look any different than Daily City's ticky tacky boxes at a superficial glance. The shopping tends to be different, but if you put the blinders on and just look at a street in isolation they're quite similar. And it looks pretty much nothing like Chandler, AZ.

Hopefully sarcasm on some people's parts. Others are pretty clearly serious.
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Old 12-26-2013, 10:06 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,996 posts, read 42,626,988 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
I think we're having the who is the least capable of observing our surroundings while buried in our iPhone competition myself. Not something I'd be proud to partake in, let alone excel at myself, but whatever. I guess some people think its a badge of pride to not be able to be so oblivious. Badge of pride that you're so ignorant about something you dislike or something, I guess. "Look, I hate the tax chattels so much I'm ignorant enough to think they all look the same" badge of urbanista pride? And the opposite as well. San Francisco and New York are definitely distinct. Even San Francisco is distinct. Large parts of it don't really look any different than Daily City's ticky tacky boxes at a superficial glance. The shopping tends to be different, but if you put the blinders on and just look at a street in isolation they're quite similar. And it looks pretty much nothing like Chandler, AZ.

Hopefully sarcasm on some people's parts. Others are pretty clearly serious.
And I can't tell where you're being sarcastic yourself, if any. San Francisco and New York City look almost nothing like San Francsico, except for maybe some downtown buildings. Some of Daly City resembles outer San Francisco neighborhoods, the inner half not so much. Not really surprising as they're right next to each other. Outside of the Bay Area, that housing style is rather unique in the US, I'm not sure if there's anything like it.

Daly City is still a rather old suburb. I'd still say older neighborhoods in general tend to be more regionally distinctive.

Last edited by nei; 12-26-2013 at 10:25 AM..
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Old 12-26-2013, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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See the bolded:

San Francisco and New York are definitely distinct.
That means they are distinct. Distinct from what? From each other. From other cities in general. They are just distinct. They don't look like each other, they don't look like some other city, say, Paris or London, and they don't look like Chandler. That doesn't mean specific streets of San Francisco don't look very similar to Daly City. Problem mostly by design, Daly City emulated the construction of Crocker Amazon and Outer Sunset and Outter Richmond, so at a cursory glance of a residential street, they look similar. There's no clear gradient line separating San Francisco and Daly City. Just being on street level, you can't tell at all when you cross over. It's literally one ticky tacky box is in Daily City and the adjacent nearly identical one is San Francisco. And none of them look like Chandler, AZ.

I don't know that I'd really agree that older is more distinct. The parts of the Peninsula and Crocker Amazon Sunset/Richmond in SF look fairly alike in terms of architecture. And while Daly City is quite old, the majority of it was built post-war. It probably had as many cows as people (slight exaggeration possibly) before Westlake was developed after the war. It's now the largest city in San Mateo County and has one of the highest transit usage rankings in the county and the second highest in California. Not bad for a 'burbs thats grown more than ten-fold since the 1940s. The Cow Palace hosted livestock shows long before the San Francisco Warriors.

Going down to the parts of the South Bay that were built in the '40s and '50s, they don't look Daly City. They're more conventional MCM and ranch which were the ubiquitous forms of construction in West, especially California, at the time, kind of like row houses are so ubiquitous in many cities on the east coast in the 19th century. You still had plenty of variety. Say Falls Church, VA. Almost none of that was built prior to the war aside from a few farm houses. There's a few losely ranch-style homes, but it's by no means common.

Move forward to the '80s-2000s and DC burbs still builds tons of Federal-style homes, row houses. You'd have trouble finding one out here in California. We don't build that stuff at all. Even if you're talking about the Neoeclectic "Mr. Potato Head" tracts, the elements they randomly borrow from are way different than we use which aren't even that common in DC burbs and are practically all that is built here. While most residential construction across the country is Neoeclectic, that doesn't mean they look similar. Street patterns and designs are different, zoning different.

Last edited by Malloric; 12-26-2013 at 12:54 PM..
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Old 12-26-2013, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,260,357 times
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Even in the metro of Los Angeles there are wildly varying versions of suburbs - from places like Thousand Oaks, Mission Viejo, Santa Clarita to places like Lakewood, Alhambra, Woodland Hills, Hawthorne to places like Burbank, Pasadena, Glendale and Santa Monica, there are widely varying styles of suburbs. So the answer is unequivocally NO, suburbs are certainly not all the same. Some are nearly rural, some are pretty much stereotypical suburbs, and some are basically smaller city-centers.

This is not unique to Los Angeles either - the Bay Area is very similar, as is Boston, NYC, etc.
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Old 12-26-2013, 02:52 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,205 posts, read 10,055,099 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warszawa View Post
Are you serious, bro?

Completely different atmospheres. Rodeo Dr is lined with palm trees and there are exotic cars parked on the sides. Boylston Street has classic New England architecture. Michigan Avenue is lined with modern skyscrapers. 5th Avenue is full of Art Deco architecture and skyscrapers.

Now try comparing Chandler AZ to Amityville NY to Secaucus NJ to Laramie WY. The only difference is that one of these places is famous for ghosts, otherwise they're all the same
I live just a few miles from Amityville and know the village pretty well. It actually has a pretty cute downtown area and has quite a number of historic homes.

Anyway, if Chandler, Arizona and Laramie, Wyoming date from the 1600s, are made up of primarily traditional colonial and large Victorian type homes and have a bayside beach and a harbor & docking area for fishing boats, then I would say you are correct - they are exactly the same.

But something tells me they are very different.

http://www.amityville.com/
http://www.amityville.com/photo-album2.cfm (some photos of Amityville)
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Old 12-27-2013, 10:42 AM
 
9,568 posts, read 9,747,520 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warszawa View Post
Are you serious, bro?

Completely different atmospheres. Rodeo Dr is lined with palm trees and there are exotic cars parked on the sides. Boylston Street has classic New England architecture. Michigan Avenue is lined with modern skyscrapers. 5th Avenue is full of Art Deco architecture and skyscrapers.

Now try comparing Chandler AZ to Amityville NY to Secaucus NJ to Laramie WY. The only difference is that one of these places is famous for ghosts, otherwise they're all the same
Yes, so all suburbs even now have the same climate too?, and the same cars?
Now I'm not saying all cities are the same, but suburbs are just as different from each other as cities.
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Old 01-01-2014, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Richmond/Philadelphia/Brooklyn
1,263 posts, read 1,288,669 times
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The issue is not that they are necessarily the EXACT same, but rather that they are more culturally homogenized as well as architecturally homogenized and bland (like much built between 1950-2000) when compared to urban and historic neighborhoods. Suburbs (while yes there are exceptions) tend to hold more chain businesses which may not necessarily have the same quality (think McDonalds VS/ a local cafe) than established inner city neighborhoods. These two things (architectural blandness, and business homogeneity) tend to drive away the more creative, artistic types who would be more likely to give the community a sort of soul to it and make it stand out.
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