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Old 01-01-2014, 04:23 PM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,812,547 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pantin23 View Post
The issue is not that they are necessarily the EXACT same, but rather that they are more culturally homogenized as well as architecturally homogenized and bland (like much built between 1950-2000) when compared to urban and historic neighborhoods.
We bland generic white people have to live somewhere, you know.
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Old 01-01-2014, 05:36 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,980 posts, read 102,527,356 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Warszawa View Post
Are you serious, bro?

Completely different atmospheres. Rodeo Dr is lined with palm trees and there are exotic cars parked on the sides. Boylston Street has classic New England architecture. Michigan Avenue is lined with modern skyscrapers. 5th Avenue is full of Art Deco architecture and skyscrapers.

Now try comparing Chandler AZ to Amityville NY to Secaucus NJ to Laramie WY. The only difference is that one of these places is famous for ghosts, otherwise they're all the same
Laramie, Wyoming? Seriously?? Seriously???

Laramie is a small city in its own right. It's the home of the U of Wyo. It's in Wyoming for pity's sake. It's not going to look like Amityville, NY.
https://maps.google.com/maps?oe=utf-...&ved=0CPYBELYD
Sidewalks, like almost all western cities.
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Old 01-01-2014, 05:38 PM
 
Location: East coast
613 posts, read 891,933 times
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Do suburbs of other countries count? I'm pretty sure England's suburbs aren't going to be the same as California's!
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Old 01-01-2014, 06:10 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,921,149 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Laramie, Wyoming? Seriously?? Seriously???

Laramie is a small city in its own right. It's the home of the U of Wyo. It's in Wyoming for pity's sake. It's not going to look like Amityville, NY.
https://maps.google.com/maps?oe=utf-...&ved=0CPYBELYD
Sidewalks, like almost all western cities.
Amityville has sidewalks on the busier streets, but not on smaller residential streets where they don't matter much.

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Amity...189.78,,0,4.39
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Old 01-01-2014, 06:16 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,980 posts, read 102,527,356 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Amityville has sidewalks on the busier streets, but not on smaller residential streets where they don't matter much.

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Amity...189.78,,0,4.39
See? Amityville and Laramie are different!
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Old 01-02-2014, 01:27 AM
 
5,772 posts, read 13,721,937 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
None are post-war auto-dependent suburbs - I was pretty clear in my post if you care to reread it.
However, the OP referred to "every suburb," presumably meant to include all suburbs, not just post-WWII 'burbs. You're cherry-picking here. Kind of like answering the question of whether all cities look the same by saying yes, because (in the view of the respondent) all old small industrial cities have that dreary look of grimy red bricks downtown and faded, gray, cramped, sagging old frame houses in the residential sections.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
I purposely ignored industrial suburbs because their residential areas are very similar to many central cities.
Another example of cherry-picking. Industrial suburbs are suburbs. Not counting them because they don't fit the preconception that all 'burbs look like Levittown is stacking the deck.

Actually, to those of us familiar with suburban areas that have seen extensive growth since WWII, it's clear that even those suburbs are not all the same. Not even close.

Last edited by ogre; 01-02-2014 at 02:22 AM..
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Old 01-02-2014, 01:32 AM
 
5,772 posts, read 13,721,937 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Laramie, Wyoming? Seriously?? Seriously???

Laramie is a small city in its own right. It's the home of the U of Wyo. It's in Wyoming for pity's sake. It's not going to look like Amityville, NY.
https://maps.google.com/maps?oe=utf-...&ved=0CPYBELYD
Sidewalks, like almost all western cities.
Good catch here. How did Laramie even enter this discussion? It's a stand-alone town, 50 miles from Cheyenne, the nearest city larger than Laramie. Laramie is not a suburb of any city.

Last edited by ogre; 01-02-2014 at 02:23 AM..
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Old 01-02-2014, 07:39 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,921,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ogre View Post
However, the OP referred to "every suburb," presumably meant to include all suburbs, not just post-WWII 'burbs. You're cherry-picking here. Kind of like answering the question of whether all cities look the same by saying yes, because (in the view of the respondent) all old small industrial cities have that dreary look of grimy red bricks downtown and faded, gray, cramped, sagging old frame houses in the residential sections.

Another example of cherry-picking. Industrial suburbs are suburbs. Not counting them because they don't fit the preconception that all 'burbs look like Levittown is stacking the deck.

Actually, to those of us familiar with suburban areas that have seen extensive growth since WWII, it's clear that even those suburbs are not all the same. Not even close.
Probably because he thought it was a more relevant distinction. Industrial rarely get grouped with other suburbs, historically they have more in common with center cities and face similar issues.
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Old 01-02-2014, 07:49 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,921,149 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by ogre View Post
Good catch here. How did Laramie even enter this discussion? It's a stand-alone town, 50 miles from Cheyenne, the nearest city larger than Laramie. Laramie is not a suburb of any city.
I suspect that poster has seen little of the country except for NYC, and whatever he saw seemed the same. From another post he made, he mentioned he immigrated recently to the US
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Old 01-02-2014, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,056 posts, read 16,063,174 times
Reputation: 12630
Quote:
Originally Posted by pantin23 View Post
The issue is not that they are necessarily the EXACT same, but rather that they are more culturally homogenized as well as architecturally homogenized and bland (like much built between 1950-2000) when compared to urban and historic neighborhoods. Suburbs (while yes there are exceptions) tend to hold more chain businesses which may not necessarily have the same quality (think McDonalds VS/ a local cafe) than established inner city neighborhoods. These two things (architectural blandness, and business homogeneity) tend to drive away the more creative, artistic types who would be more likely to give the community a sort of soul to it and make it stand out.
My suburb has a bunch of local cafes. San Francisco has a bunch of McDonald's. There are very few artistic, creative types left in San Francisco, unless you're talking about programmers, doctors, lawyers, and engineers. The "starving artist" creative-types live in the bland suburbs not giving the community a sort of soul to make it stand out because they can't afford to live in the city. The same is true for Manhattan. Next, I'm sure, we'll be hearing how Bushwick has more soul and community than Manhattan.
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