U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-21-2013, 03:01 PM
 
9,556 posts, read 9,733,621 times
Reputation: 5967

Advertisements

Saying that is like saying every city is the same, because they have some people, and some office towers, so they must all be identical.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-21-2013, 03:09 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,509 posts, read 18,596,047 times
Reputation: 11998
It's not a black and white answer, it's yes and no. No, depending on what part of the country it's in, the type of zoning it has, age of the suburban settlement, and the income brackets would be the most poignant differentials. There are obviously big exceptions in every sizable metro area. Yes in that many suburbs in every part of the country with all the homogenized corporate, commuter, and consumer culture. Taking a drive down.......

Route 28 in Salem, NH
Route 528 in Rio Rancho, NM
McDowell Rd in Avondale, AZ
Capital Hwy in North Raleigh, NC
Pacific Hwy in Everett, WA
Colfax Ave in Lakewood, CO

aren't a whole lot different than one another.

Last edited by Desert_SW_77; 12-21-2013 at 03:30 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-21-2013, 03:32 PM
 
9,556 posts, read 9,733,621 times
Reputation: 5967
Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
It's not a black and white answer, it's yes and no. No, depending on what part of the country it's in, the type of zoning it has, age of the suburban settlement, and the income brackets would be the most poignant differentials. There are obviously big exceptions in every sizable metro area. Yes in that many suburbs in every part of the country with all the homogenized corporate, commuter, and consumer culture. Taking a drive down.......

Route 28 in Salem, NH
Route 528 in Rio Rancho, NM
McDowell Rd in Avondale, AZ
Capital Hwy in North Raleigh, NC
Pacific Hwy in Everett, WA
Colfax Ave in Lakewood, CO

aren't a whole lot different than one another.
Look at
5th Ave in NY
Michigan Ave in Chicago
Boylston in Boston
Rodeo Dr in LA
How different are they?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-21-2013, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Michigan
4,571 posts, read 7,107,368 times
Reputation: 3605
Yes, I do honestly believe most suburbs are the same given that a large majority of the were built during similar time periods with roughly similar forces driving their development.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-21-2013, 04:08 PM
 
9,556 posts, read 9,733,621 times
Reputation: 5967
Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
Yes, I do honestly believe most suburbs are the same given that a large majority of the were built during similar time periods with roughly similar forces driving their development.
Same with Atlanta, Charlotte, Denver, Chicago, Omaha, Indianapolis, Dallas, Kansas City, Nashville,, Railroads hubs, Reconstruction-1910 were boom years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-21-2013, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Michigan
4,571 posts, read 7,107,368 times
Reputation: 3605
Yea, so what's your point? It'd be pretty odd if any of those cities didn't have similar aspects during that time.

What makes them different is how those cities changed over time. Obviously, Chicago was the most industrial of those cities and had a totally different growth pattern compared to Atlanta which really didn't boom until sometime around the 1970s. So wouldn't it be obvious that Atlanta would resemble more of a city built in the 1970s than one built in 1910?

As far as suburbs, most cities and metros' suburbs grew during the 60s, 70s, and 80s due to the construction of freeways, white-flight, and an affluent middle-class. There are some suburbs that are older, but not as much.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-21-2013, 04:31 PM
 
1,613 posts, read 1,961,018 times
Reputation: 871
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Look at
5th Ave in NY
Michigan Ave in Chicago
Boylston in Boston
Rodeo Dr in LA
How different are they?
Extremely different.

How are they similar, outside of the fact that all are varying degrees of urban, and all have shopping?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-21-2013, 05:11 PM
 
9,556 posts, read 9,733,621 times
Reputation: 5967
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichiVegas View Post
Extremely different.

How are they similar, outside of the fact that all are varying degrees of urban, and all have shopping?
They sell the same things, same style, they are as similar to each other as Salem, NH is to Bakersfield, Ca.
Plus there are Suburbs like Hingham, Mass, Bristol, RI, Cherry Hill, NJ are just as old and "unique" as their central cities. (And many more)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-21-2013, 05:16 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,509 posts, read 18,596,047 times
Reputation: 11998
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Look at
5th Ave in NY
Michigan Ave in Chicago
Boylston in Boston
Rodeo Dr in LA
How different are they?
Well in your OP you asked about suburbs, so that's what I posted about. I think urban similarities and differences have already been beaten to death on C-D. It's like comparing what's more urban, Toronto or Philadelphia? They both are.

I will say Rodeo Dr is a much different element than Boylston or Newbury St in Boston. Anyways, you were saying about suburbs?

Last edited by Desert_SW_77; 12-21-2013 at 05:35 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-21-2013, 05:59 PM
 
1,613 posts, read 1,961,018 times
Reputation: 871
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
They sell the same things, same style, they are as similar to each other as Salem, NH is to Bakersfield, Ca.
No they don't. They sell different things, and different style, and totally different architecture and scale and urban planning.

The shopping on these streets is quite different. Rodeo Drive is small boutiques, Fifth Ave is more flagship-style giant stores, Michigan Ave. has malls, not sure why you included Boylston because it isn't a top shopping street (did you mean Newbury St.?), but there are some stores. Newbury looks nothing like Fifth or Rodeo or Michigan either, not that matters.

And obviously the buildings, sidewalks, architecture, scale, height, etc. are all totally different. The car vs. transit orientation is totally different. Rodeo Drive looks nothing like Fifth Avenue, which looks nothing like Boylston.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:09 AM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top