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Old 12-24-2013, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Oceania
8,623 posts, read 6,252,837 times
Reputation: 8318

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
I think the idea is there'd be common storage for bicycles.


Don't be silly, you just buy new clothing every season.


Don't be silly, the only "hobby" appropriate for the young urban professional living in such a place is going out on the town.


Yep, and when you are 40 you have nothing to show but a closet and a dying liver. I don't get it.
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Old 12-24-2013, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Oceania
8,623 posts, read 6,252,837 times
Reputation: 8318
This is where it is headed.

Rabbit hutches
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Old 12-24-2013, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Northeast Ohio
319 posts, read 383,034 times
Reputation: 915
I could live in one of these apartments with ease; gimme a bed, a bathroom, and a kitchenette with minifridge and microwave, and I'm set. I've lived in small spaces with minimal furnishings/possessions for years. Currently, there are two of us in a 380 square foot apartment. Our place is cute as a button, and has everything we need.

Two things I have learned that make living in small spaces much more enjoyable are:

1. White noise is your friend. Whether it's a fan, a sound machine, or an air purifier, running one (or more) can help drown out a LOT of noise from the street, other apartments, etc.
2. Air circulation is a must. Again, the air purifier or fan will work wonders here; it's very bad to close yourself up in a small space and let the air around you sit and ferment. In warmer months, a dehumidifier is a great thing to have.
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Old 12-24-2013, 10:35 PM
 
2,941 posts, read 3,859,930 times
Reputation: 1439
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
The only housing we seem to build assumes 2 parents, 2 kids, 2 cars and a dog when all go the stats and data show the average household looks a lot different these days and we refuse to build and design accordingly.

For example I have little need for a formal dining room. A few times a year I'd love to host a gathering of 12-20 people. No need to move into a huge place for that need, I'd happily use a shared entertaining room. Now my shared entertaining room is my favorite restaurant of the season.
Those mini apartments are only good for two things young people that just need a place to crash or someone who is single and low income and needs very cheap rent. Otherwise not useful. I once visited someone in one of those tiny things. I could reach over to the stove from the bed!

The reason why they build housing like the kind you describe is because housing like it is often the most flexible for life’s many situations both with and without children. Right now there is a trend away from the separate dining room (or a room that can only function as one). For instance in a three bedroom house even without kids the extra bedroom can be used as an office or den while still having a guest room. Grandparents also sometimes want the grand kids to be able to spend the night and so having an extra room or so useful and some people want extra space for their hobbies.

A garage that can hold 2 cars is popular because it is easy to get into when if you only have one car. It can be used for hobby space or storage and so on. I live in an area with one car garages and basically that about all they can hold and not much more. Also we live in a world where both husband\wife or girlfriend\boyfriend or parent\teenager may have cars and both need to be accommodated.

Also using restaurants like that gets rather expensive quickly unless you are just doing once or twice a year and depending on the design of the house the dinning room could be used for more than parties.
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Old 12-25-2013, 09:06 AM
 
1,153 posts, read 1,058,187 times
Reputation: 1899
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sedivec View Post
I could live in one of these apartments with ease; gimme a bed, a bathroom, and a kitchenette with minifridge and microwave, and I'm set. I've lived in small spaces with minimal furnishings/possessions for years. Currently, there are two of us in a 380 square foot apartment. Our place is cute as a button, and has everything we need.

Two things I have learned that make living in small spaces much more enjoyable are:

1. White noise is your friend. Whether it's a fan, a sound machine, or an air purifier, running one (or more) can help drown out a LOT of noise from the street, other apartments, etc.
2. Air circulation is a must. Again, the air purifier or fan will work wonders here; it's very bad to close yourself up in a small space and let the air around you sit and ferment. In warmer months, a dehumidifier is a great thing to have.
I agree with you. I could live in a microapartment easily. In fact, I currently live in a 450 square foot studio by myself and it's TOO MUCH space for me. I've never felt cramped. I'd like to downgrade to a microapartment, but no such option exists where I live. I believe I live in one of the smallest apartments in my area. I make a low income, don't have much, and prefer living alone, so a small apartment is all I need and want.
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Old 12-25-2013, 09:35 AM
 
3,836 posts, read 4,715,982 times
Reputation: 2538
Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Those mini apartments are only good for two things young people that just need a place to crash or someone who is single and low income and needs very cheap rent. Otherwise not useful. I once visited someone in one of those tiny things. I could reach over to the stove from the bed!

The reason why they build housing like the kind you describe is because housing like it is often the most flexible for life’s many situations both with and without children. Right now there is a trend away from the separate dining room (or a room that can only function as one). For instance in a three bedroom house even without kids the extra bedroom can be used as an office or den while still having a guest room. Grandparents also sometimes want the grand kids to be able to spend the night and so having an extra room or so useful and some people want extra space for their hobbies.

A garage that can hold 2 cars is popular because it is easy to get into when if you only have one car. It can be used for hobby space or storage and so on. I live in an area with one car garages and basically that about all they can hold and not much more. Also we live in a world where both husband\wife or girlfriend\boyfriend or parent\teenager may have cars and both need to be accommodated.

Also using restaurants like that gets rather expensive quickly unless you are just doing once or twice a year and depending on the design of the house the dinning room could be used for more than parties.
Can someone give me a logical reason why a place to live must accommodate all things for all people?

A micro apartment would no more suit a family of five than a 4000 SF 3 car mcmansion in the the suburbs would suit a young single professional just starting out in life.

Folk, it's like this: not everyone needs a 2 car garage - some people might not even need a one-car garage and many people don't want to pay for such things if they don't need them. What's it to you if people want to live this life style? Micro-apartments provide options for people who aren't you. If no one wants them, then no market will exist and they won't be built.

Contrarily, if people want them then THERE IS NO REASON ON EARTH why we should deny them this. What we want to force people into homes they don't want at prices they can't afford to live in places they don't want to be? Why?
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Old 12-25-2013, 09:43 AM
 
Location: New York City
4,036 posts, read 8,940,925 times
Reputation: 3703
I agree that there should be strict limits on the maximum occupancy of such units. Although I suspect that we be controversial among low-income advocates and single parents who would feel discriminated against.

On the other hand, it’s unfair to look at the psychological effects of such apartments without considering the alternative: living with multiple roommates and spaces not designed for such use, long commutes, or leaving a city altogether. As such, micro apartments are only useful in a handful of dense and unusually attractive cities like New York, San Francisco, Boston and DC.

Micro apartments are designed for a niche market: 20-something professionals starting careers and GLBT people without children. Some people might consider it elitist to create housing for such people, but they’re precisely the demographics that exert gentrification pressure on outlying, working-class communities. You can’t preserve those neighborhoods without addressing the core economics of supply and demand.
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Old 12-25-2013, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,674,744 times
Reputation: 26666
Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post

A garage that can hold 2 cars is popular because it is easy to get into when if you only have one car. It can be used for hobby space or storage and so on. I live in an area with one car garages and basically that about all they can hold and not much more. Also we live in a world where both husband\wife or girlfriend\boyfriend or parent\teenager may have cars and both need to be accommodated.
This trend is decreasing. I know quite a few couples who have one car or less and choose to live in more walkable neighborhoods. Most with household incomes over 100k. This is much more common with people younger than I. They just don't car about cars and would rather allocate their money elsewhere and use car shrink services in the occasion they need a car.

I would be surprised if the average teen wants a car these days as many I meet haven't even learned to drive.

Quote:
Also using restaurants like that gets rather expensive quickly unless you are just doing once or twice a year and depending on the design of the house the dinning room could be used for more than parties.
Going to restaurants occasionally is cheaper than doubling or tripling my rent for that extra space I don't need most of the time.
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Old 12-25-2013, 12:36 PM
 
15,554 posts, read 13,536,591 times
Reputation: 21312
Location drives the prices, so just because they are micro apartments does not mean they are going to be the cheapest around, just the cheapest in the immediate area. For example in Arlington, VA, the super small apartments like I lived in were not that much cheaper than one a a couple hundred square feet larger, but to someone with lower income, a couple of hundred dollars a month is a lot.

These micro apartments are not going to have rents two, three times cheaper than normal apartments in the area. Someone in Clarendon (high priced area in Arlington) is not going to build micro apartments and have them going for two, three times cheaper, they in fact will be priced based on the square foot rate in the area as all the apartments are. Anyone can go online and look at the prices of current apartments and see the price scale starting at studios.

I am all for it though, as a comment on the article alluded to, maybe this will remove the roommate thing many places are exposed to, thus driving up prices. Where I live (Brickell, Miami), many people have roommates, a lot of the two bedroom places have two to four people crammed in them, and one bedrooms usually have two people. It really props the prices up in the area.
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Old 12-25-2013, 04:00 PM
 
13,320 posts, read 25,569,771 times
Reputation: 20505
When I lived in studio apartments, there were cit ordnances about the number of sq.ft. per occupant. I'd live in a studio again (am now in a 1250 sq.ft. house in the woods) but the layout has to be right and there has to be sufficient windows and trees. (My best studio ever had big windows overlooking a lovely backyard garden).

When I went from studios to a one-bedroom house of about 650 sq.ft., I felt overwhelmed by space. I still use my holdup IKEA-style dining table. The main reason I have a house is to avoid psycho neighbors or landlords and to have dogs. I really want control of my environment and finances. Micro apartments in my nearby city are not affordable at all- they are market rate for studios.
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