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Old 12-25-2013, 05:13 PM
 
15,566 posts, read 13,559,246 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
When I lived in studio apartments, there were cit ordnances about the number of sq.ft. per occupant. I'd live in a studio again (am now in a 1250 sq.ft. house in the woods) but the layout has to be right and there has to be sufficient windows and trees. (My best studio ever had big windows overlooking a lovely backyard garden).

When I went from studios to a one-bedroom house of about 650 sq.ft., I felt overwhelmed by space. I still use my holdup IKEA-style dining table. The main reason I have a house is to avoid psycho neighbors or landlords and to have dogs. I really want control of my environment and finances. Micro apartments in my nearby city are not affordable at all- they are market rate for studios.
I sometimes think 90% of all apartment issues are due to these.

The urbanists, or who ever, should try addressing these issues.
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Old 12-25-2013, 05:22 PM
 
35,108 posts, read 40,296,531 times
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I've lived in smaller spaces however, the place shown in the photo for the article I would never consider.
Everything is too tall and completely out of reach for me unless I stand on a 3' - 4' or taller ladder.
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Old 12-25-2013, 06:19 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,703,335 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post
I sometimes think 90% of all apartment issues are due to these.

The urbanists, or who ever, should try addressing these issues.
You can have crazy neighbors or landlords in any living scenario. The biggest problem is the downgrade in construction quality where walls are paper thin.
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Old 12-25-2013, 06:43 PM
 
15,566 posts, read 13,559,246 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
You can have crazy neighbors or landlords in any living scenario. The biggest problem is the downgrade in construction quality where walls are paper thin.
I know even houses can have crazy neighbors and landlords; my point I did not make but you did was regarding the construction quality. The trend now, or at least for the last decade (I have no idea when it started) is to have poor quality construction where you can hear neighbors talking, microwave beeping, and "intimate" moments.

I have lived in older apartments (two, both built early 70's, late 60's) and did not have these issues. Every other apartment I have lived in has been from the late 90's on up, and all of them have sucked. From my low priced one in TN, to my high priced ocean view condo in Miami, the same cheap construction. Oh yes, neighbors that have to yell, scream, stomp their feet, music, remodeling, etc, it just never seems to end. I cannot wait to get into a house for some quiet time.
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Old 12-25-2013, 06:50 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,847 posts, read 30,385,098 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Not hostility to urbanism just concern for the conseqences. Cramming people into small spaces isn't always a good thing. I think there should be laws regarding who may rent this type. Not a problem for a single person, but so much as an infant and this arrangment would create problems. In terms of low income housing this only has limited potential for this problem. An low income single could afford it, but if you cram a family in this small a space you will have problems. There were studies in the 80ies that found a correlation between crime and crowding in low income housing. This also likely does not help the situation in regards to housing for the disabled either as all that rearanging for sleep, cookign ect. is going to be a problem as well as perhaps lack fo space fow a wheel chair.
I agree because you know dem 'po folks always have dem famblies.

As for me, I can take it or leave it. There won't be a health risk if you bring in fresh air and keep it reasonably clean. I'd never live in the city anyway.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 12-25-2013, 07:29 PM
 
533 posts, read 951,399 times
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I'm a "young professional" who just graduated from college this year and I live in a 1100-1200 sq foot apartment (but no garage). Any smaller and I really don't know what I would do or where I would store things neatly and out of the way.

I saw the floor plan on the first page of this thread... That looks like a jail cell, I could NEVER do that.
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Old 12-25-2013, 07:44 PM
 
2,209 posts, read 1,737,568 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Octa View Post
LOL you bring up some good points especially about the "hobby". Look at this floor plan from a micro apartment in Vancouver:



(Source link: Tiny House Blog , Archive Canada)

I've never seen anything like it before. It's very reminiscent of the "Live, work, and play" slogans that are used to attract young urban professionals to these things. In a way it's like their lifestyles are being defined for them.

In all seriousness: what exactly is a yuppie lifestyle? It seems to be the commercialized version of what hipsters have been doing for decades.



I agree and I didn't even think of the policy implications. Right now, we have public housing and some efforts for to increase inclusionary housing in newer units so that low income residents can live in areas with decent schools and have greater access to schools. These micro-apartments could become seen as the "free market" solution for low income residents by conservative politicians such as Bloomberg so they an dance around the issue of income stratification.
That's just awful.
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Old 12-25-2013, 07:47 PM
 
1,380 posts, read 1,889,436 times
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I agree that studios feel like a jail cell. A small one bedroom would be fine for just me, but separate living and sleeping rooms are a necessity. And coming from a town where studios are rare, the whole concept of choosing to live in one seems utterly crazy to me. Frankly, I don't think anybody really chooses to live like that. But you have to do what you have to sometimes.
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Old 12-25-2013, 08:00 PM
 
3,836 posts, read 4,718,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eastmemphisguy View Post
I agree that studios feel like a jail cell. A small one bedroom would be fine for just me, but separate living and sleeping rooms are a necessity. And coming from a town where studios are rare, the whole concept of choosing to live in one seems utterly crazy to me. Frankly, I don't think anybody really chooses to live like that. But you have to do what you have to sometimes.
Quite a few people live in dorms in college - shred room, no personal space, hell, not even much shared space.

Soldiers frequently share large open barracks for months, if not years.

People who go to sea share berths. 3 in 8 hours shifts. . .

It's amazing what people can readily adapt to given the circumstances. If someone is young and starting their professional life and wants to have a small space close to their place of work and near where the action is why should we deny this? What because it's "unhealthy"? What a load of crap. Is nearly ever soldier, every sailor and every student living with far far less personal space in an unhealthy environment?
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Old 12-25-2013, 08:04 PM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,854,178 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
Is nearly ever soldier, every sailor and every student living with far far less personal space in an unhealthy environment?
Yes.
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