U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-25-2013, 08:07 PM
 
1,380 posts, read 1,886,862 times
Reputation: 2384

Advertisements

I shared a very small dorm room my freshman year in college. Roomie wasn't a bad guy at all, and we got along as well as we could given the situation. I still don't think it was a healthy arrangement. If people want to live in a micro-apartment, I'm not saying they shouldn't be able to. It's their life, not mine. I just suspect that in most cases, it's out of desperation and not a pleasant choice. Maybe we should be looking at why rents are so damn high (to paraphrase a comic genius) that people have no other affordable options.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-25-2013, 11:20 PM
 
2,970 posts, read 2,749,284 times
Reputation: 6562
Quote:
Originally Posted by Octa View Post
This was posted in the Atlantic Cities a few days ago:





The Health Risks of Small Apartments - Jacoba Urist - The Atlantic Cities


What do you guys think? Would you feel comfortable living in one and for how long?

For me I would have to say that somewhere between 400-600 sq ft is my comfort zone when it comes to apartment sizes since I don't need an apartment to be too big, but I don't want it to be too small either. There are times where I want a change of pace from my bedroom and I sit in a main area that is separate from the bedroom.
At one time I lived in about 500 sf apartment and it was fine as I had a job were I traveled and was gone much, so it was really just a place to store my stuff. To each their own. I could do it for maybe a year or two. I didn't have to worry about shared HVAC ducting, though it was a basement unit in garden style apartment complex and it got uncomfortable in hottest months with no AC.

The bigger issues would be health concerns in these types of setup - physical and mental health - over time. For instance, do these units have shared HVAC within the stacks? How do they deal with Water issues. Problem with 'hive' like living in general, depending on quality of construction, is that with shared HVAC the units sometimes can be only as clean as the dirtiest dweller.

I think they would work OK for certain demographics and certain cities with high land valuations that need to accommodate lower socio economic workers. Not my first choice for living quarters. So much it this type of life style living is determined by the level and scope of shared common space and amenities. If there are enough I could probably go quite a long time provided the construction quality was good and individual HVAC setup with good ventilation.

Pretty soon we'll get one of these modular "China" designs just for residential people warehousing but pay custom prices:

***30-story building built in 15 days*** Construction time lapse *View Fullscreen* - YouTube


Really nothing new - the Three Stooges had already demonstrated close quarters living with poor construction quality See 6:20 to end with bunk beds


PT 2 The Three Stooges In G.I. Wanna Home - YouTube


Now I'd take one like this futuristic one from Fifth Element especially if Milla Jovavich would 'fall' into my sky cab

Fifth Element - Bruce Willis talking to Finger - YouTube

When it gets too crowded let's go Seasteading with Peter Theil!
https://www.google.com/search?q=pete...w=1366&bih=651

Last edited by ciceropolo; 12-25-2013 at 11:27 PM.. Reason: additional
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2013, 12:12 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,166 posts, read 29,665,044 times
Reputation: 26651
Quote:
Originally Posted by ggumbo View Post
I'm a "young professional" who just graduated from college this year and I live in a 1100-1200 sq foot apartment (but no garage). Any smaller and I really don't know what I would do or where I would store things neatly and out of the way.

I saw the floor plan on the first page of this thread... That looks like a jail cell, I could NEVER do that.
I have 500 sqft it isn't really too small other than my shoe problem.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2013, 12:20 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,166 posts, read 29,665,044 times
Reputation: 26651
Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post
I know even houses can have crazy neighbors and landlords; my point I did not make but you did was regarding the construction quality. The trend now, or at least for the last decade (I have no idea when it started) is to have poor quality construction where you can hear neighbors talking, microwave beeping, and "intimate" moments.

I have lived in older apartments (two, both built early 70's, late 60's) and did not have these issues. Every other apartment I have lived in has been from the late 90's on up, and all of them have sucked. From my low priced one in TN, to my high priced ocean view condo in Miami, the same cheap construction. Oh yes, neighbors that have to yell, scream, stomp their feet, music, remodeling, etc, it just never seems to end. I cannot wait to get into a house for some quiet time.
I live in a 50s building now. It is great, I really only hear noise from outside when the windows are open, and ours are only single pane. And I hear the water running in my bathroom for upstairs, where the bathrooms line up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eastmemphisguy View Post
I agree that studios feel like a jail cell. A small one bedroom would be fine for just me, but separate living and sleeping rooms are a necessity. And coming from a town where studios are rare, the whole concept of choosing to live in one seems utterly crazy to me. Frankly, I don't think anybody really chooses to live like that. But you have to do what you have to sometimes.
I don't find it difficult to live in a studio. It takes too much inertia to leave for no good reason. Honestly, as long as you have a good layout, the lack of walls isn't an issue. What is more important is closet space. My studio happens to have more than the bulk of the 1 bedrooms in the neighborhood, and I have seen most of them. Not everyone needs the same amount of space. Space for private time is more important than square footage. Sharing a 1000 foot room is more stressful than have a 400 sq ft retreat to yourself.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2013, 08:25 AM
 
1,153 posts, read 1,057,715 times
Reputation: 1894
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastmemphisguy View Post
I agree that studios feel like a jail cell. A small one bedroom would be fine for just me, but separate living and sleeping rooms are a necessity. And coming from a town where studios are rare, the whole concept of choosing to live in one seems utterly crazy to me. Frankly, I don't think anybody really chooses to live like that. But you have to do what you have to sometimes.
I currently live in a 450 square foot studio because I'm poor and need to live alone. But I love it. Even if I became wealthy, I'd choose to live in a studio (of course it would be a luxury studio in a much better location). I don't think everyone is attracted to a lot of space. I just view larger spaces as more to maintain. And I don't feel like I'm in a jail cell ever.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2013, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Long Island
715 posts, read 1,019,431 times
Reputation: 610
I think that if there are some great amenities within a micro-apartment building (storage space, rooftop deck, pool, maybe the place is made of greener matierials), it could be a nice place to live.

Another important thing when it comes to a micro-apartment building is the surrounding area. Having lots of restaurants, cafes, entertainment venues, bars, a dog park, and great public transportation can really extend your living space beyond a 400-500 sq ft apartment.

Micro-apartments are not for everyone obviously, but there is an appeal there for someone who doesn't have or want a lot of possessions, but wants to live in an area to experience a certain lifestyle.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2013, 08:44 AM
 
15,536 posts, read 13,528,656 times
Reputation: 21253
Quote:
Originally Posted by maniac77 View Post
I currently live in a 450 square foot studio because I'm poor and need to live alone. But I love it. Even if I became wealthy, I'd choose to live in a studio (of course it would be a luxury studio in a much better location). I don't think everyone is attracted to a lot of space. I just view larger spaces as more to maintain. And I don't feel like I'm in a jail cell ever.
If you were rich, or at least not poor, would you still live in the same size studio?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2013, 08:47 AM
 
15,536 posts, read 13,528,656 times
Reputation: 21253
Quote:
Originally Posted by okellies View Post
I think that if there are some great amenities within a micro-apartment building (storage space, rooftop deck, pool, maybe the place is made of greener matierials), it could be a nice place to live.

Another important thing when it comes to a micro-apartment building is the surrounding area. Having lots of restaurants, cafes, entertainment venues, bars, a dog park, and great public transportation can really extend your living space beyond a 400-500 sq ft apartment.

Micro-apartments are not for everyone obviously, but there is an appeal there for someone who doesn't have or want a lot of possessions, but wants to live in an area to experience a certain lifestyle.
That is the problem with this. The micro apartments are supposely for people who cannot afford normal apartments, but it seems everyone talks about these things being located in pricey areas. So it is bascially about people wanting to afford to live in the nicer, pricier areas, not the fact of having more affordable housing.

If they are that poor, they are not going to be utilizing those things often at all. If they are that poor, they should stop looking to live in pricey, trendy areas, and move out to a place they can afford.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2013, 08:57 AM
 
1,153 posts, read 1,057,715 times
Reputation: 1894
Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post
If you were rich, or at least not poor, would you still live in the same size studio?
Yes, but the apartment would have much nicer amenities and would be in a much warmer locale within short walking distance to a bunch of good restaurants and a grocery store.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2013, 11:09 AM
 
1,356 posts, read 1,635,834 times
Reputation: 1035
Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
One thing has nothing to do with the other. Liver work play has to do with where live in relation to job and leisure, not the size of your residence.

As for their lifestyles being "defined for them" - what else is there? Live, work, play. . .that's pretty much everything right. The idea is that you can do this in your home or outside your front door by choosing to live in a place that can accommodate this. If people want to do this (and many do) what's it to you?

I just don't understand the mentality that is so hostile to urbanism that people don't even want the option for it to exist.
I've never seen you on this board before, but I don't think people who are familiar with my posting history would ever characterize as being "hostile to urbanism". I'm not militant about urbanism, but I'm definitely pro-urbanism.


"Live, work, play". It's a marketing strategy to get people into those units now that urban living is the latest fad and when it comes to that image, it inspires the same type of bouncy rhetoric that makes it seem cool. Like I said in my previous post, hipsters(actual hipsters, not scenesters) and artists have been doing this for decades, but now it's trendy to mark up these units as if they're following in their footsteps.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
I don't understand why the creation of small apartments automatically means people,will cram 4 people into them. I live in a 500 sqft studio. Now I feel like I could use a bit more space, but I am coming off a stint of working at home, and I could definitely tone down in terms of possessions. I think 400 sqft per per person is plenty of space, with a smart design. I also think living. In a small studio in a building with great amenities would be a great option for many people.

I this article is fear mongering as all of the "micro apartments" are targeted at people who live alone not more.

In many areas there is an extreme lack of housing development, and more infrastructure would make a huge difference.

There is no rule that says living in a studio is a forever choice for all life stages.
I disagree. Just because a policy states that it aims to do something doesn't mean it will do exactly that. It may do it 100% or it may not resulting in some mission creep or some sort of unintended consequence. We already have widening income inequality which makes the problem of wealth fortification in cities and rising rents problematic, but the abandonment of healthy and affordable living policies for low income residents would be a very dire consequence.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top