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Old 12-26-2013, 11:25 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee Ex-ex-ex-urbs
358 posts, read 416,310 times
Reputation: 725

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I grew up on 18 acres in a woodland. I listened to the trees creak in the wind at night and the frogs in the marsh. Once in a while a car would go past on the highway. There were no loud boomcars in those days.

I miss that so much. I wish I could get back to it, but I can't afford to own a house, let alone that much land. I'm going to be stuck in apartments the rest of my life, putting up with the noisy neighbors and noisy streets.

Now that's depressing.
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Old 12-27-2013, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
9,256 posts, read 8,334,527 times
Reputation: 20181
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tone509 View Post

Once a year or so, my wife and I visit her family who live about an hour outside of Dallas TX. Among the pros are a feeling of security strong enough to leave doors unlocked

I'm an "elder" of Generation X and for me, the trend or preference for urbanish environments has been with me since I started heading into the city as a teenager with my friends. Diff'rent strokes for diff'rent folks.

My husband and I never ever lock our front door and we live downtown Fort Lauderdale. Because it is a tourist area, it is crawling with police and there are no homeless or gangs.

I'm also at the top end of Generation X.

Last edited by FindingZen; 12-27-2013 at 12:02 PM.. Reason: sorry, I changed the location for privacy reasons.
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Old 12-27-2013, 10:35 AM
 
1,356 posts, read 1,637,945 times
Reputation: 1035
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueherons View Post
You could not pay me to live in Miami. Absolutely no diversity.

Fort Lauderdale is a melting pot.
I always thought Miami was pretty diverse, but look at Ft. Lauderdale's stats, I can see where you're coming from.
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Old 12-27-2013, 10:44 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,058,839 times
Reputation: 14811
Quote:
Originally Posted by Octa View Post
I always thought Miami was pretty diverse, but look at Ft. Lauderdale's stats, I can see where you're coming from.
Miami proper is mostly hispanic (80%) so it's rather non-diverse in the sense of most people being from one background.
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Old 12-27-2013, 10:50 AM
 
9,401 posts, read 9,563,269 times
Reputation: 5810
Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
Only a millennial would view a 2000 year old pattern of human habitation as new.

The last 50 years are the aberration. It was an experiment, it failed terribly. Most people enjoy being out and among other people as long as the city is well designed.
Urbanization is new, from 10,000 B.C. (agriculture) - 1890, most people lived in small towns/no town in America, people live in cities when they need too, hence Germans went west, the poor Irish had to stay in the cities, until recently.
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Old 12-27-2013, 10:53 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,058,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Urbanization is new, from 10,000 B.C. (agriculture) - 1890, most people lived in small towns/no town in America, people live in cities when they need too, hence Germans went west, the poor Irish had to stay in the cities, until recently.
In Massachusetts, however, somewhere between 85-90% of the population lived in large towns or cities by 1900.

Plenty of Germans stayed in cities, too. The US had lots of available land to make it worthwhile to move out to the country.
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Old 12-27-2013, 11:30 AM
 
5,712 posts, read 8,780,439 times
Reputation: 4932
mbradley, I wondered about your comment

Quote:
I'm going to be stuck in apartments the rest of my life
Do you need subsidized housing? Why not a trailer out in the country after you retire and don't need to be near a job. What kind of work do you do that can't be adapeted for a small town.
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Old 12-27-2013, 12:02 PM
 
7,970 posts, read 18,099,726 times
Reputation: 2597
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueherons View Post
My husband and I never ever lock our front door and we live downtown Fort Lauderdale. Because it is a tourist area, it is crawling with police and there are no homeless or gangs.

I'm also at the top end of Generation X.
Sounds good!
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Old 12-27-2013, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,896 posts, read 7,668,317 times
Reputation: 4508
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
Only a millennial would view a 2000 year old pattern of human habitation as new.

The last 50 years are the aberration. It was an experiment, it failed terribly. Most people enjoy being out and among other people as long as the city is well designed.
Urbanization is new, from 10,000 B.C. (agriculture) - 1890, most people lived in small towns/no town in America, people live in cities when they need too, hence Germans went west, the poor Irish had to stay in the cities, until recently.
While I don't agree with the hyperbole, I think Komeht is correct. Until about 60-70 years ago, people lived in: cities, small towns, or farms/rural areas. Yes, there were suburbs by then, but even they were still--mostly--built in an urban form. It wasn't until after WWII that the auto-dependent suburb with curvy roads and cul-de-sacs, the type that is so often stereotyped on this forum, and the kind of suburb that I think Komeht is referring to, came into vogue.
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Old 12-27-2013, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
9,256 posts, read 8,334,527 times
Reputation: 20181
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Miami proper is mostly hispanic (80%) so it's rather non-diverse in the sense of most people being from one background.
Most people think that since there are a lot of Latinos in Miami, it is diverse. It is not.
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