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Old 12-27-2013, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,256,138 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drive carephilly View Post
It's not really a new trend. What's new is that the media has taken notice.

It started in the late 60s in Manhattan with counterculture people colonizing Greenwich Village and quickly spread to other big cities. Likewise "yuppies" as you call them aren't new. That was term coined in the 80s to describe the young professional class who wanted to live close to work and close to opportunities to socialize after work. By the 80s every big city had yuppies . . . young URBAN professionals.

By the late 80s it had gained enough momentum that shows like Seinfeld and Full House were relevant enough to become popular.

In the 90s Friends and Sex and the City followed.

It's really nothing new. It's been gaining momentum for 40 years. It's just to the point in the last 10 years where it's become mainstream enough for people to take notice. In the 10,000 years that humans have been settling in towns and cities the post-WWII suburbs are just a footnote.
We're really trying to go back to how cities were in the pre-automobile era. Manhattan's population actually peaked in the 1920s, it's a good example of how cities before spread out auto-derived suburbs were like. Higher density housing, mixed use, much more walkable, built to a human scale. People would often meet on the street, they'd know their neighbour, kids in the neighbourhood would live together. There was more of a sharp boundary between the city and the country. Now we have vast suburbs which were initially designed as like 'living in the country with the convenience of the city'. In many cases the bad suburbs have neither benefit. First came the railway/street car suburbs, a bit denser and more accessible, then of course the auto suburbs where one had to have a car to get anywhere.
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Old 12-27-2013, 06:31 PM
 
2,774 posts, read 3,589,964 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emmiesix View Post
Some may like it, but I would say what is driving people into the cities are a lot of boring lonely childhoods lived by people now in their 30s. I know that's why we moved to the city.
Exactly.
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Old 12-27-2013, 11:22 PM
 
900 posts, read 795,700 times
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I grew up in Coldwater Canyon, an affluent but remote area between Beverly Hills and the SFV. Nothing to walk to nor any amenities for several miles. It wasn't a bad place to grow up, and as kids we had a lot of fun playing and climbing around in the still semi-wild hills that ran behind everyone's houses. But if we wanted to go to the movies or anything like that, we had to be driven until we turned sixteen. Going to school was similar, a long school bus ride with the bus stopping at almost every house where a student lived, rather than at collective bus stops.

I wouldn't go back now if you gave me the house for free.
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Old 12-28-2013, 03:45 PM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,842,524 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
We're really trying to go back to how cities were in the pre-automobile era. Manhattan's population actually peaked in the 1920s, it's a good example of how cities before spread out auto-derived suburbs were like. Higher density housing, mixed use, much more walkable, built to a human scale.
I don't think you're going to have a lot of support for the kind of high-density housing you'd find in Manhattan in the 1920s. I suggest a visit to the Tenement Museum.
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Old 12-28-2013, 04:20 PM
 
1,380 posts, read 1,888,383 times
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Yeah, a lot of the reason Manhattan was so dense was there were often a dozen poor, dirty people living in one room. Diseases spread rapidly with poor sanitation. It wasn't glamorous. My immigrant grandmother lived on the LES in the 1930s, and her entire floor had to share one bathroom.
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Old 12-28-2013, 05:15 PM
 
1,714 posts, read 3,139,588 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eastmemphisguy View Post
Yeah, a lot of the reason Manhattan was so dense was there were often a dozen poor, dirty people living in one room. Diseases spread rapidly with poor sanitation. It wasn't glamorous. My immigrant grandmother lived on the LES in the 1930s, and her entire floor had to share one bathroom.
My friend and her family used to live in a rundown apartment like that in San Fransico... that was only about 15 years ago. I am sure that building still exists.

I brought a friend of mine from Palo Alto to that friend's place--talk about culture shock.
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Old 12-28-2013, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Nort Seid
5,288 posts, read 7,610,720 times
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I wonder if this approach will spread with more urbanization and greater density...

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/26/us...?src=recg&_r=0
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Old 12-28-2013, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,686,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chi-town Native View Post
I wonder if this approach will spread with more urbanization and greater density...

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/26/us...?src=recg&_r=0
That's terrible. I absolutely hop in the crosswalk when it says don't walk if there is sufficient time to cross. Especially once I leRn how the light is timed. Hopefully road diets and traffic calming becom the norm in DTLA.
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Old 12-28-2013, 09:34 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,998,698 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
That's terrible. I absolutely hop in the crosswalk when it says don't walk if there is sufficient time to cross. Especially once I leRn how the light is timed. Hopefully road diets and traffic calming becom the norm in DTLA.
sounds like "obey ped signals at all times" is more of a SoCal norm than a California-wide norm? From what I noticed, pedestrians followed the signals more in San Francisco than in cities back home, say Boston and obviously NYC. But not everyone waited and it seemed like the norm was to cross as soon as the other road turned yellow. Nowhere as extreme as Seattle.
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Old 12-28-2013, 11:12 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee Ex-ex-ex-urbs
358 posts, read 415,964 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
mbradley, I wondered about your comment

Do you need subsidized housing? Why not a trailer out in the country after you retire and don't need to be near a job. What kind of work do you do that can't be adapeted for a small town.
Subsidized housing?

WTF?
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