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Old 01-01-2014, 02:44 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,014 posts, read 102,634,943 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
That isn't an urban v suburban thing. I lived on the edge of downtown Portland and knew a number of neighbors on my street as well as everyone that lived in my little building. My sister-in-law lives in North Portland which is that area between suburban and urban and they know most of the people that live on their streets. My parents live on a cul-de-sac suburban development and they know most of the people living on their street and surrounding streets.

Heck, here in Brooklyn, I see people who interact with their neighbors all the time, it is called being social...I can't comment on your time in Pittsburgh or Denver, but maybe you had a different experience than other people did.
You know, I was with you right until your last sentence. Maybe YOU had a different experience than other people did!
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Old 01-01-2014, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,538,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
You know, I was with you right until your last sentence. Maybe YOU had a different experience than other people did!
I am sure we have had different experiences based on your post....not sure why you disagree with that. Some people are more social than others. Maybe where you lived in Pittsburgh and Denver, you had more neighbors that were less social that you. I can't say, I can only guess, but I wouldn't assume that it was because those two places were more urban for you as the reason for your neighbors being less social.
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Old 01-01-2014, 02:55 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,014 posts, read 102,634,943 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
I am sure we have had different experiences based on your post....not sure why you disagree with that. Some people are more social than others. Maybe where you lived in Pittsburgh and Denver, you had more neighbors that were less social that you. I can't say, I can only guess, but I wouldn't assume that it was because those two places were more urban for you as the reason for your neighbors being less social.
You seem to think your experience is the more typical, that's what I disagree with. I wouldn't assume that either, but the demographics of cities lend themselves to people being less social with their neighbors, e.g. more transients, more young people, more renters.

THE TRADE WINDS - NEW YORK'S A LONELY TOWN LYRICS
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Old 01-01-2014, 02:57 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,998,698 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
You seem to think your experience is the more typical, that's what I disagree with. I wouldn't assume that either, but the demographics of cities lend themselves to people being less social with their neighbors, e.g. more transients, more young people, more renters.
Wouldn't more young people make a place more social?
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Old 01-01-2014, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,538,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
You seem to think your experience is the more typical, that's what I disagree with. I wouldn't assume that either, but the demographics of cities lend themselves to people being less social with their neighbors, e.g. more transients, more young people, more renters.

THE TRADE WINDS - NEW YORK'S A LONELY TOWN LYRICS
I never said my experience is more typical, unless you are saying your experience is more typical...also more transients, more young people, more renters doesn't mean less social. Go to any bar in a young urban area and it will be full of young people being social.

Being social or anti-social has nothing to do with urban vs suburban vs rural.
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Old 01-01-2014, 04:27 PM
 
8,978 posts, read 8,115,335 times
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Quote:
Wouldn't more young people make a place more social?
No.
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Old 01-01-2014, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,686,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AtkinsonDan View Post
I wonder if some of these different experiences can be attributed to regional differences? I live in a community that is exurban sprawl by C-D definitions but in reality it is a farming community dating back to the 1700s. While the farming aspect has declined from what it once was and some land has been turned into subdivisions we still have enough active farming that people will be guaranteed to encounter it whenever passing through town.

I do acknowledge that the tract housing common to the newer communities out west sounds very boring and unpleasant to live in. However I have never seen that type of development in the northeast. My area tends to develop under the pattern of large custom homes on 2 to 3 acre lots and trust me the market for these homes remains robust despite these urban trends.
Absolutely. One difference from California from the Midwest and south is that church is not an anchor at all. Around 20% are involved on a regular basis. The numbers can vary in some immigrant communities, but on the whole that takes away a huge way that people make friends and connect. If you don't have kids network creationism harder. Someone once told me in CA, the gym is her church.
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Old 01-01-2014, 10:29 PM
 
Location: East coast
613 posts, read 893,333 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
If you don't have kids network creationism harder. Someone once told me in CA, the gym is her church.
I paused a bit when reading this because at first I thought it had something do with creationism (as in the belief that living things didn't evolve) and was wondering what it had to do with urban friendships.
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Old 01-01-2014, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
12,304 posts, read 10,774,658 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post

But the biggest issue I have is with our development. The only housing we have built over the past 70 years is car oriented sprawl. I find the bulk of people under 45ish in my region don't want it. I also meet many people who are older than 45, the empty nesters if you will who don't want it either.
Perhaps you need to leave Oakland or California. It's nothing like that everywhere else in the country. Plenty of places have homes in the city for far less than a million bucks and have been built within the last 70 years.
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Old 01-02-2014, 12:26 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,686,954 times
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Originally Posted by markovian process View Post
I paused a bit when reading this because at first I thought it had something do with creationism (as in the belief that living things didn't evolve) and was wondering what it had to do with urban friendships.
Hehe. A typo.
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