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Old 01-02-2014, 12:28 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,738,725 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ss20ts View Post
Perhaps you need to leave Oakland or California. It's nothing like that everywhere else in the country. Plenty of places have homes in the city for far less than a million bucks and have been built within the last 70 years.
I am a Californian through and through. My network is here and I don't like the cold.

There are trade offs of course, but I have taken a different angle and volunteering from a planning angle.
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Old 01-02-2014, 07:41 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,089,742 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ss20ts View Post
Perhaps you need to leave Oakland or California. It's nothing like that everywhere else in the country. Plenty of places have homes in the city for far less than a million bucks and have been built within the last 70 years.
Other than prices, I don't think California is different from than the rest of the country in amount of infill development.
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Old 01-02-2014, 01:36 PM
 
2,553 posts, read 2,009,570 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I also think that it isn't so much about just the urban aspect, but more about the walkability aspect. There are still walkable neighborhoods within city limits that are comprised of single family homes. Some may even like suburbs that are walkable and that are relatively more dense than the stereotypical suburb as well. So, I think that this trend is practical and can be fulfilled in different ways.
I agree, but would go more global and say that it's about the ability to do more things--exercise, be entertained, shop, etc.--closer to home.

But this means higher (density of uses and a mix of uses, which means less land devoted to cars because land is scarce (ie, finite) and land use is mutually exclusive, which in turn means higher walkability and bike-ability.
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Old 01-03-2014, 06:55 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,288,926 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
I don't think you're going to have a lot of support for the kind of high-density housing you'd find in Manhattan in the 1920s. I suggest a visit to the Tenement Museum.
Of course now we have stricter building codes, health law, better sanitation, utilities.etc so you can't really compare quality of life then to now. Density isn't always bad, just badly designed housing + density.
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Old 01-03-2014, 08:32 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,089,742 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Of course now we have stricter building codes, health law, better sanitation, utilities.etc so you can't really compare quality of life then to now. Density isn't always bad, just badly designed housing + density.
But Manhattan's peak population in the 1920s you gave as an example did have overcrowding, that's why it had more people with less high rises than today.

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2...ref=realestate
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Old 01-03-2014, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
12,304 posts, read 10,799,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
I am a Californian through and through. My network is here and I don't like the cold.

There are trade offs of course, but I have taken a different angle and volunteering from a planning angle.
It's not cold everywhere in the country except for Cali. Even northern gets cool!
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Old 01-03-2014, 03:28 PM
 
1,211 posts, read 892,508 times
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I posted on this earlier this year - on why we think our urban neighborhood is an ideal place to raise our kids. For those that know Boston, we live in Somerville, MA near Porter and Davis squares.

Is raising kids in the city better?
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Old 01-03-2014, 06:27 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,138,543 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
sounds like "obey ped signals at all times" is more of a SoCal norm than a California-wide norm? From what I noticed, pedestrians followed the signals more in San Francisco than in cities back home, say Boston and obviously NYC. But not everyone waited and it seemed like the norm was to cross as soon as the other road turned yellow. Nowhere as extreme as Seattle.
This crackdown is mostly limited to DTLA and not the rest of the city. People violate the countdown rule en masse every day in downtown LA, part of the reason people are so outraged (even suburban-minded and based Daily News has an editorial demanding the crackdown to cease). The problem is that if people violate the countdown timer, it is basically impossible to make a right turn in a car - however that does not warrant 250+ dollar tickets.
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Old 01-03-2014, 07:50 PM
 
16 posts, read 23,559 times
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Simple reason of wanting to be around a high concentration of restaurants and bars
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Old 01-03-2014, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,738,725 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ss20ts View Post
It's not cold everywhere in the country except for Cali. Even northern gets cool!
It is pretty mild in northern ca. I hate humidity too. And supreme heat. . Out of options!
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