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Old 12-23-2013, 04:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by armory View Post
#3 makes no sense. What was once legal, and has been made illegal, legal again? That is rather vague.
You can't pin auto dependency on any one demographic group as all drive cars of every variety. City dwellers like their MBs, BMWs and Porsches as much as suburbanites like their Prius, Accords, and minivans. Urbanity cannot command the premiums a private 25 acre lot commands as there are none in urban settings unless they be public parks. What other premiums are commanded?

More people should listen to Alex Jones versus 60 Minutes. One makes you think while the other tells a bland tale of ZZZZZZZ... That bland guy is usually Scott Pelly, the wost television journalist CBS has put on the air. I wait for him to break down and cry crocodile tears at times.
This is all I need to know about you. Enjoy your fantasy world - I'm moving on.
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Old 12-23-2013, 05:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Living way out in cookie-cutter suburbs in houses that reach their peak value 10 - 20 years after they are built and then start falling apart because they are literally paper houses
ROTFL. The Levittowns still stand. So do Malvina Reynolds' "Little Boxes".
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Old 12-23-2013, 05:08 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 26 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,020 posts, read 102,674,652 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Annuvin View Post
The more posts like this I read, the more I wonder how many urbanists have ever set foot in a so-called subburb, much less lived in one.

FTR: The easiest place to remain anonymous is in a large city. The volume of people that live within them make them inherently anti-social by nature, and is the reason why the streets of large cities often attract large numbers of mentally ill and schizophrenics. You really should try visiting a rural/small town of less than 30,000 people some time if you truly want to know what living in a social community feels like.
Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post
As much as I like living in the city, my opinion is there is more socialization outside of it. I find many city people fall into their own secluded cliques made up of college/work buddies. Plus much of this is made up of the early to mid-20's crowd; all centered around hunting for the opposite sex (or same if gay).

I wonder if some of these people who claim the suburbs (and rural?) areas have less socialization has ever actually lived in the suburbs, and if so, what actually are the details regarding the socialization differences? For example, who are you currently socializing with, and how did you meet, and what is the frequency and depth of this socializing?
Agreed. And yet, some of these posters will say they grew up in the burbs, had a horrible childhood, etc. Now I don't want to make light of anyone who was abused or bullied, but that has nothing to do with the setting.

Yes, the city is more anonymous. Renters, which comprise a lot of city dwellers, moreso than in the burbs, come and go more frequently. When you've lived in the same home for 24 years, and most of your neighbors have been there as long if not longer, you get to know each other. Plus, a lot of socialization is through groups, like clubs or sports, or through work, which may have zero bearing on where you live. Some of us also have families in the area with whom we occasionally socialize.
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Old 12-23-2013, 05:12 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,423 posts, read 37,841,648 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Annuvin View Post
Ironically, the larger the population, the less you matter. As I stated earlier, when I was in Newfoundland I stood out like a sore thumb. Everyone knew everyone so it was obvious I was not from around there. They also had a much greater sense of community there, so I was approached by numerous Newfies and met a lot more of them than I did anytime I have been in Toronto (where I was born and now work). In a city, people are far more impersonal. Because there is a fairly good chance that you won't encounter any random person on the street again, proper manners go out the window. You are merely one face among many and don't matter as much to other members of the public. It is a much colder existence without any sense of community whatsoever. There was an example not too long ago where a homeless man died outside one of Japan's largest malls and people were stepping over him for three days before anyone told the authorities.



Even urbanites do not want this. But as I explained above, the larger the group, the easier it is to stay anonymous. Many mental conditions cause paranoia, so these people naturally avoid smaller communities where they would draw unwanted attention.



That is what the internet is for.
Another example. Out in the country here, if you pass a vehicle going the other way, you're more than likely going to wave, even if you don't know the person, because you recognize and acknowledge them as a person - it's simply what is done. In the city, if you did that, you'd be waving all the time and probably have a wreck, and it would be meaningless. The former is an acknowledgment of another person and that, where there aren't as many, we all depend on each other more.

Also, if you're driving down the road and some animals (cows, horses, donkeys, whatever) are loose, everyone stops and works together to try to find out who the animals belong to (assuming everyone doesn't already know) and get them rounded up and home, or at least confined until the owner can be found. It's not anything you decide to do in order to be a good guy; it's just what is done, and you know that if your animals get out, anyone driving down the road will do the same for you.

In the suburbs, it's true, a lot of it does revolve around children, but not necessarily your own. As I said, my sister, now in her mid-70's, lives in the same suburb she raised her kids in, and she, and those kids, now grandmothers themselves, will help out young families who have moved into the neighborhood. It's multi-generational, in other words, far from the bland homogenous community that many here seem to think it is.
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Old 12-23-2013, 07:17 PM
 
229 posts, read 248,712 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
Anyway, what is the driving force behind this urban trend that is sweeping the nation? People clamor for and love density, areas teeming with people, living units stacked on top of each other, etc.
A generation of frustrated young people who are fed up with driving, loneliness, consumerism and monotony of suburbia and think that there is more to life than Facebook and late night television.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
I'm a millennial, and maybe I am old fashioned or of a different upbringing, but I like my space. I think suburbs, neighborhoods with spaced out houses, or homes on the countryside are the better places to raise a family and are overall less stressful and more easy going, albeit probably more expensive.
Suburbia wasn't born out of people's choices. Suburbia is a government program that never ended.
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Old 12-23-2013, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
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The percentage of the population comprised of families with children is ever shrinking. Not only are people having fewer kids, but they are having them at a later age, and they are also living longer (more empty nesters). Without kids, living in an urban environment is much more feasible/desirable. Also urban crime rates are at 40 year lows.
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Old 12-23-2013, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,423 posts, read 37,841,648 times
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I'm an empty nester. I will NEVER move back to an urban environment if I have any choice at all in the matter. It would drive me stark raving mad to be forced to do so.
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Old 12-23-2013, 07:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post
I'm an empty nester. I will NEVER move back to an urban environment if I have any choice at all in the matter. It would drive me stark raving mad to be forced to do so.
Why are you on an urban planning forum at all? You live 45 minutes from the nearest city worth going to, a city you seem to hate more with each post you write, and you express disdain for absolutely anything urban. Why do you care at all?
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Old 12-23-2013, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
5,522 posts, read 12,296,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post
I'm an empty nester. I will NEVER move back to an urban environment if I have any choice at all in the matter. It would drive me stark raving mad to be forced to do so.
And many empty nesters will agree with you. But quite a few empty nesters do find urban living desirable, so much so that in my metro (Chicago), there's a whole segment of the real estate industry catering to this demographic. I'm not sure that was the case 30 years ago.
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Old 12-23-2013, 07:47 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,026,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Agreed. And yet, some of these posters will say they grew up in the burbs, had a horrible childhood, etc. Now I don't want to make light of anyone who was abused or bullied, but that has nothing to do with the setting.
Remember this thread I made?

Have you lived in the suburbs before?

Most posters grew up in the burbs, and almost all lived in the suburbs at some point in their life. I don't think posters would bother criticize suburbs much if they had never lived there, they wouldn't think about them if they never experienced them.
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