U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-23-2013, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,051 posts, read 102,757,343 times
Reputation: 33099

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Agreed. And yet, some of these posters will say they grew up in the burbs, had a horrible childhood, etc. Now I don't want to make light of anyone who was abused or bullied, but that has nothing to do with the setting.
To wit:

Quote:
Originally Posted by emmiesix View Post
More to the point, except for this abberant period in American history (and probably a few other times and places where racial/class strife was very high), most cities are organized so that the wealthy live in the most central parts and economic status goes down as you reach the outskirts. That has been normal for thousands of years. Living way out in cookie-cutter suburbs in houses that reach their peak value 10 - 20 years after they are built and then start falling apart because they are literally paper houses, in 'communities' built around nothing but strip malls and schools is honestly just not a great way to live. Some may like it, but I would say what is driving people into the cities are a lot of boring lonely childhoods lived by people now in their 30s. I know that's why we moved to the city.

Quote:
Originally Posted by im_a_lawyer View Post
A generation of frustrated young people who are fed up with driving, loneliness, consumerism and monotony of suburbia and think that there is more to life than Facebook and late night television.



Suburbia wasn't born out of people's choices. Suburbia is a government program that never ended.
BTW, Mr/Ms Lawyer, what do you do in the evenings?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-23-2013, 09:45 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
12,304 posts, read 10,796,678 times
Reputation: 20547
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
No. Many if not most buildings in Manhattan were to be 6 stories. Plenty were demolished in the last century to make way for taller buildings.
There are dozens that were built far above 6 stories. yes, many have been built up on. Many have been torn down. There are numerous buildings still standing and in use that are 80 years old.

Category:Art Deco architecture in New York City - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The first one listed was built as a 14 story building. It's now 50.

Second one is 48 stories and was once the 4th tallest tower building in the world. It's still 48 stories.

Third one is 18 stories.

Fifth one is 33 stories.

Sixth one is 35 stories. I could keep going, but I think you get the point.

The above are not all apartments/condos. Some have office space. The fifth one is the coolest to me. It has a theatre in it. It was built by Paramont back in the 1920's and has a fascinating history.

There's even a 4 story building built in the 1700's that's still standing. Not something you find everyday in Manhattan or anywhere else for that matter.

Fraunces Tavern - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2013, 12:27 AM
 
2,388 posts, read 2,960,847 times
Reputation: 1953
Quote:
Originally Posted by impala096 View Post
Currently, 8 out of the 10 fastest growing US counties with populations over 100,000 are in the 'burbs'. Only Orleans Parish (recovering from Katrina) and Midland County (oil jobs) made the list for the cities.
If I live in a town of 1000 people that's mostly farms or forest and a new subdivision of 100 homes goes in I would live in the fastest growing place in the US.

The question is which counties added the most people? Not the largest percentage of people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2013, 12:35 AM
 
2,388 posts, read 2,960,847 times
Reputation: 1953
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post
Could you provide cites to that claim that the percentage of the population comprised of families with children is shrinking? Because my personal and professional lives don't reflect that at all. Now, they ARE having children at later ages, I'll grant you that.
Oakparkdude already gave you good cites but the trend has been going on since at least the 80s throughout the developed world.

Fewer than 1/4 of households in most metros have school aged children. Maybe that's your client base but they're hardly even a majority of the market.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2013, 07:18 AM
 
7,495 posts, read 9,783,728 times
Reputation: 7394
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
Perhaps it is mainly C-D users, or perhaps it is a real new wave and movement; honestly I'm inclined to believe it is a bit of both, this comes from the mindset of most posters here and the population trends in cities. Anyway, what is the driving force behind this urban trend that is sweeping the nation? People clamor for and love density, areas teeming with people, living units stacked on top of each other, etc.

I'm a millennial, and maybe I am old fashioned or of a different upbringing, but I like my space. I think suburbs, neighborhoods with spaced out houses, or homes on the countryside are the better places to raise a family and are overall less stressful and more easy going, albeit probably more expensive.

What is it with hipsters and these new trendy yuppies who are all about living in the heart of the city?

I am in no way shape or form against this! Also, I am glad that some people are moving back to the cities, this is resurrecting countless downtowns across the nation, which is a good thing! However, downtown and urban life is not something everyone wants, but what is driving this new trend?
Proximity to work and social outings. Also, it's become a trend in the last twenty years or so to move into urban areas since so many have been restored. I guess it's like a new thing. I lived in a downtown area for a few years and loved it. I would still live there if not for the fact that I have a car. But in past generations, there were cities in the 60s up into the 90s in which you didn't go downtown. It was just unheard of.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2013, 08:47 AM
 
410 posts, read 390,554 times
Reputation: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by drive carephilly View Post
If I live in a town of 1000 people that's mostly farms or forest and a new subdivision of 100 homes goes in I would live in the fastest growing place in the US.

The question is which counties added the most people? Not the largest percentage of people.
Not true. Someone living in Centralia, Pa who has septuplets would be the fastest growing place in the US. The condition was counties with populations over 100,000 people to weed out these small towns that see large population increases on a percentage basis.

Fort Bend County, TX adding roughly 42,000 people between 2010-2012 is significant. There is obviously demand for suburban living in that part of the country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2013, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,733,004 times
Reputation: 26676
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
Perhaps it is mainly C-D users, or perhaps it is a real new wave and movement; honestly I'm inclined to believe it is a bit of both, this comes from the mindset of most posters here and the population trends in cities. Anyway, what is the driving force behind this urban trend that is sweeping the nation? People clamor for and love density, areas teeming with people, living units stacked on top of each other, etc.

I'm a millennial, and maybe I am old fashioned or of a different upbringing, but I like my space. I think suburbs, neighborhoods with spaced out houses, or homes on the countryside are the better places to raise a family and are overall less stressful and more easy going, albeit probably more expensive.

What is it with hipsters and these new trendy yuppies who are all about living in the heart of the city?

I am in no way shape or form against this! Also, I am glad that some people are moving back to the cities, this is resurrecting countless downtowns across the nation, which is a good thing! However, downtown and urban life is not something everyone wants, but what is driving this new trend?
I am at the edge of millennials and gen x and I have always been more drawn to living in the city. Honestly, I always wanted to live in a loft or above Main Street.

I grew up in the suburbs. I drive, and knew learning to drive would represent freedom from being stuck in my subdivision, but in college I didn't drive and I loved it. I liked the freedom of walking to places, and being able to have a drink and go home without worrying about the consequences. I felt "bad" that my first car wasn't a solar car like I envisioned from age 8 on. Actually I am still mad about that, since they were supposed to be ready 20 years ago.

Over the last 70 years we actually eliminated choice in living arrangements. We only created car oriented development and the concept of drive till you qualify instead of creating affordable housing in all sorts of locations. We divested in our cities and left them to ruins with dilapidated buildings and terrible schools. In that context, these days they are thriving despite this divestment, imagine what would have happened if we didn't set policy to let them decline over the past 50 years.


Quote:
Originally Posted by impala096 View Post
Currently, 8 out of the 10 fastest growing US counties with populations over 100,000 are in the 'burbs'. Only Orleans Parish (recovering from Katrina) and Midland County (oil jobs) made the list for the cities.
But the burbs are densifying and becoming more urban, with development concentrated on transit friendly areas and burbs creating more walkable Main Street areas like we used to have.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Annuvin View Post
The more posts like this I read, the more I wonder how many urbanists have ever set foot in a so-called subburb, much less lived in one.

FTR: The easiest place to remain anonymous is in a large city. The volume of people that live within them make them inherently anti-social by nature, and is the reason why the streets of large cities often attract large numbers of mentally ill and schizophrenics. You really should try visiting a rural/small town of less than 30,000 people some time if you truly want to know what living in a social community feels like.
This is a misconception. I live in a mid sized city, renting a condo. I have lived in the same place for about 8 years, I know 50% of the people in my building by name. I know other people that live on my block (which is fairly dense with mostly 3-4 story 20 unit buildings and a few single family homes mixed in). I regularly met my neighbors on my transit commute. I run into friends, former classmates, coworkers, acquaintances etc at the local grocery or bar or pharmacy. I live near a "Main Street" which is where everyone goes. The street is packed with shops, restaurants, bars etc. frankly, I can't go out in my city without running into someone I know. It is like a small town.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AtkinsonDan View Post
Absolutely! Socializing is not limited to the cities. I actually began socializing more once I moved out of the city. The slower pace allows for deeper and more meaningful friendships. The catch is that people have to put forth some effort to sustain those friendships. You just can't lazily saunter into a dance club or coffee shop in the small towns and suburbs.
Socializing is a basic human need. People in cities socialize as much as everyone else. I find that in some areas it is very difficult to break in socially since people, have well established social circles. When I was 12 my family moved across country to another suburb. My parents didn't really make many social connections although they were very friendly. Most were from my dads high school and college classmates or frat brothers. Previous connections. And a few coworkers. The bulk of my classmates had been their all of their lives. And their parents had been friends since birth, forming multigenerational bonds. The few of us who were non natives unintentionally formed friendships, and the bulk of mine from that time were "newbies." Cities tend to be much more accepting of letting the "transients" break in socially.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2013, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,733,004 times
Reputation: 26676
I guess I forgot to add is that when I hear about a city where they have built end to end transit that connects the entire metro area, I feel a few pangs of jealousy, and want to move. I am car dependent at the moment, but have been working towards building a life where I could eliminate my private car. I'd much rather take transit / walk / bike around town, and I do as much as I can.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2013, 12:30 PM
 
1,714 posts, read 3,144,670 times
Reputation: 1137
I will tell you guys a short story about my experience with extreme urbanity:

I spent a chunk of my childhood in tenement housing. Real tenement housing--my family's unit was 650sqft max... this included the "kitchen" and the "bathroom." The building had hundreds and hundreds of these tiny units. We had small restaurants, small shops, and a marketplace just downstairs, so everything was walkable. We walked everyday.

The only people my family knew were the families immediately across from and next to us. We never really went inside their units to visit... nor ever had meals together. They were just neighbors we knew by names.

Just because we lived somewhere compact, walkable, and urban, that didn't mean that we had a highly social lifestyle. In fact, our neighbors really didn't know anyone else on the same floor either... let alone anywhere else in the building.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2013, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,051 posts, read 102,757,343 times
Reputation: 33099
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post

Socializing is a basic human need. People in cities socialize as much as everyone else. I find that in some areas it is very difficult to break in socially since people, have well established social circles. When I was 12 my family moved across country to another suburb. My parents didn't really make many social connections although they were very friendly. Most were from my dads high school and college classmates or frat brothers. Previous connections. And a few coworkers. The bulk of my classmates had been their all of their lives. And their parents had been friends since birth, forming multigenerational bonds. The few of us who were non natives unintentionally formed friendships, and the bulk of mine from that time were "newbies." Cities tend to be much more accepting of letting the "transients" break in socially.
If you live in an area with few transplants, it is difficult to make new friends. You see that over and over here on CD. There are some cities where most people have lived for generations. Whether they live in the city or the burbs, they socialize with family. One often wonders how any of them find spouses/partners! I don't think cities are much different than the burbs in that regard. Cities are well known for being cold lonely places. "New York's a Lonely Town", etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by genjy View Post
I will tell you guys a short story about my experience with extreme urbanity:

I spent a chunk of my childhood in tenement housing. Real tenement housing--my family's unit was 650sqft max... this included the "kitchen" and the "bathroom." The building had hundreds and hundreds of these tiny units. We had small restaurants, small shops, and a marketplace just downstairs, so everything was walkable. We walked everyday.

The only people my family knew were the families immediately across from and next to us. We never really went inside their units to visit... nor ever had meals together. They were just neighbors we knew by names.

Just because we lived somewhere compact, walkable, and urban, that didn't mean that we had a highly social lifestyle. In fact, our neighbors really didn't know anyone else on the same floor either... let alone anywhere else in the building.
Exactly!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top