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Old 12-22-2013, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,514 posts, read 9,075,418 times
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Perhaps it is mainly C-D users, or perhaps it is a real new wave and movement; honestly I'm inclined to believe it is a bit of both, this comes from the mindset of most posters here and the population trends in cities. Anyway, what is the driving force behind this urban trend that is sweeping the nation? People clamor for and love density, areas teeming with people, living units stacked on top of each other, etc.

I'm a millennial, and maybe I am old fashioned or of a different upbringing, but I like my space. I think suburbs, neighborhoods with spaced out houses, or homes on the countryside are the better places to raise a family and are overall less stressful and more easy going, albeit probably more expensive.

What is it with hipsters and these new trendy yuppies who are all about living in the heart of the city?

I am in no way shape or form against this! Also, I am glad that some people are moving back to the cities, this is resurrecting countless downtowns across the nation, which is a good thing! However, downtown and urban life is not something everyone wants, but what is driving this new trend?
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Old 12-22-2013, 09:25 PM
 
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People wanting to be around other people for the oldest of reasons.
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Old 12-22-2013, 09:47 PM
 
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Probably gas prices and/or car dependence both playing a big factor in this. Some may view car dependence or being strictly car dependent as a pain in terms of costs.

I also think that it isn't so much about just the urban aspect, but more about the walkability aspect. There are still walkable neighborhoods within city limits that are comprised of single family homes. Some may even like suburbs that are walkable and that are relatively more dense than the stereotypical suburb as well. So, I think that this trend is practical and can be fulfilled in different ways.
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Old 12-22-2013, 09:53 PM
 
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People are social creatures by nature, and the suburbs do not fulfill our social needs. They are inherently antisocial, as more of us are beginning to realize. They also promote an unhealthy sedentary lifestyle.
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Old 12-23-2013, 12:52 AM
 
2,388 posts, read 2,959,170 times
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It's not really a new trend. What's new is that the media has taken notice.

It started in the late 60s in Manhattan with counterculture people colonizing Greenwich Village and quickly spread to other big cities. Likewise "yuppies" as you call them aren't new. That was term coined in the 80s to describe the young professional class who wanted to live close to work and close to opportunities to socialize after work. By the 80s every big city had yuppies . . . young URBAN professionals.

By the late 80s it had gained enough momentum that shows like Seinfeld and Full House were relevant enough to become popular.

In the 90s Friends and Sex and the City followed.

It's really nothing new. It's been gaining momentum for 40 years. It's just to the point in the last 10 years where it's become mainstream enough for people to take notice. In the 10,000 years that humans have been settling in towns and cities the post-WWII suburbs are just a footnote.
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Old 12-23-2013, 04:03 AM
 
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Currently, 8 out of the 10 fastest growing US counties with populations over 100,000 are in the 'burbs'. Only Orleans Parish (recovering from Katrina) and Midland County (oil jobs) made the list for the cities.
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Old 12-23-2013, 06:49 AM
 
Location: Poshawa, Ontario
2,986 posts, read 3,326,677 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
People are social creatures by nature, and the suburbs do not fulfill our social needs. They are inherently antisocial, as more of us are beginning to realize. They also promote an unhealthy sedentary lifestyle.
The more posts like this I read, the more I wonder how many urbanists have ever set foot in a so-called subburb, much less lived in one.

FTR: The easiest place to remain anonymous is in a large city. The volume of people that live within them make them inherently anti-social by nature, and is the reason why the streets of large cities often attract large numbers of mentally ill and schizophrenics. You really should try visiting a rural/small town of less than 30,000 people some time if you truly want to know what living in a social community feels like.
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Old 12-23-2013, 07:28 AM
 
Location: Earth
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They like to crowd into a trendy spot so they can claim that overpopulation is real!
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Old 12-23-2013, 07:36 AM
 
4,073 posts, read 3,105,910 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
People are social creatures by nature, and the suburbs do not fulfill our social needs. They are inherently antisocial, as more of us are beginning to realize. They also promote an unhealthy sedentary lifestyle.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annuvin View Post
The more posts like this I read, the more I wonder how many urbanists have ever set foot in a so-called subburb, much less lived in one.

FTR: The easiest place to remain anonymous is in a large city. The volume of people that live within them make them inherently anti-social by nature, and is the reason why the streets of large cities often attract large numbers of mentally ill and schizophrenics. You really should try visiting a rural/small town of less than 30,000 people some time if you truly want to know what living in a social community feels like.
Absolutely! Socializing is not limited to the cities. I actually began socializing more once I moved out of the city. The slower pace allows for deeper and more meaningful friendships. The catch is that people have to put forth some effort to sustain those friendships. You just can't lazily saunter into a dance club or coffee shop in the small towns and suburbs.
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Old 12-23-2013, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Poshawa, Ontario
2,986 posts, read 3,326,677 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AtkinsonDan View Post
Absolutely! Socializing is not limited to the cities. I actually began socializing more once I moved out of the city. The slower pace allows for deeper and more meaningful friendships. The catch is that people have to put forth some effort to sustain those friendships. You just can't lazily saunter into a dance club or coffee shop in the small towns and suburbs.
When I visited rural Newfoundland (Bonavista Bay), I couldn't walk into a bar without a Newfie asking where I was from. This usually resulted in said Newfie buying me a beer and having a friendly chat. Had I been living there, I could have made fast friends with anyone I ran into while I was there. The same simply cannot be said for any large metropolitan area. In most cities, you could drop dead on the sidewalk and people would simply step over your corpse in their rush to get to where they're going.
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