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Old 01-01-2014, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,567,055 times
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I use to know this information but for the life of me I can't remember, I want to say I remember something about if someone is a unlicensed designer, there is a maximum square footage they can design up to before needing an architect to sign off on the designs. Specifically with Oregon. If anyone here knows any info on this, I would greatly appreciate it.
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Old 01-01-2014, 07:20 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
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I don't know about Oregon but as an architectural designer here in California (specifically San Diego) one can design a single family home and up to three units total (used to be four) without needing an architectural stamp. This does not mean that you may not be needing other licensed professionals to get a building permitted, such as anything over one level needs an engineer's stamp here in California, or architectural details accurately depicting the designed construction of the building which is still required.
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Old 01-01-2014, 11:16 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Thanks Damon, I use to know all this info back when I was in college, but it has been several years now since I have had to think about it, and I have never been one to have that great of a memory when it comes to remembering little details like that.
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Old 01-06-2014, 09:36 AM
 
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While it varies from State to State, usually the rules are up to a two-family dwelling.
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Old 01-06-2014, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,567,055 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
While it varies from State to State, usually the rules are up to a two-family dwelling.
Thanks, that is basically what I am seeing, though I haven't found the specific law for Oregon yet.
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