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Old 01-07-2014, 06:31 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059

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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
"Suburb" usually means a town or development that picks and chooses what it will allow within its limits. For example: no factories allowed but gleaming corporate offices OK, no housing under $300K, no dance clubs or questionable entertainment venues. Of course there are many exceptions. Another rule of thumb is within 100 miles of center city with population below P*(100-m)/100, where P is the population of the central city, m is miles from central business district of that city. Also, a suburb may not have its own network TV station.
Oh, for Pity's sake! Give examples of these burbs that don't allow factories or housing <$300K, other than maybe, Beverly Hills. Many cities have certain areas for dance clubs and other "questionable entertainment" or disallow them altogether. As I said, growing up in the Pittsburgh area, the steel mills were mainly outside the city limits. Some TV stations are actually located in the burbs.
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Old 01-07-2014, 06:33 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnhw2 View Post
Westinghouse, Gulf Oil were also based in Pittsburgh. But Steel supreme until it wasnt
Too true! I thought about them after I posted last night, and I was on my kindle, which is hard to edit.
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Old 01-07-2014, 06:34 PM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,193,822 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Sure I do. I was just posing the questions to someone who thinks that city and suburbs can be determined by the type of housing. Whether you live in a city or suburb is determined by the city limits.
There should be a smilie for "beating a dead horse".

There should also be a rule you can't post a comment without reading the original post.
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Old 01-07-2014, 06:37 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059
^^I did not start this thread, but I have every right to respond, though I do refuse to respond to insults such as the above.
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Old 01-07-2014, 07:04 PM
 
12,296 posts, read 15,190,901 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Oh, for Pity's sake! Give examples of these burbs that don't allow factories or housing <$300K, other than maybe, Beverly Hills. Many cities have certain areas for dance clubs and other "questionable entertainment" or disallow them altogether. As I said, growing up in the Pittsburgh area, the steel mills were mainly outside the city limits. Some TV stations are actually located in the burbs.
Oak Brook, Lincolnshire or Barrigton Hills IL, Los Altos CA, Scarsdale NY, the list goes on and on. Many suburbs, true, are not so exclusive. Some are almost purely industrial and discourage residential. And Rosemont, a suburb of O'Hare, chooses mostly airport realted businesses like hotels. By TV stations, do you mean the transmitters? Usually the studios are in central city.
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Old 01-07-2014, 07:14 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
Oak Brook, Lincolnshire or Barrigton Hills IL, Los Altos CA, Scarsdale NY, the list goes on and on. Many suburbs, true, are not so exclusive. Some are almost purely industrial and discourage residential. And Rosemont, a suburb of O'Hare, chooses mostly airport realted businesses like hotels. By TV stations, do you mean the transmitters? Usually the studios are in central city.
I googled the main Denver channel addresses, and I got city locations. However, the reporters sometimes talk about being at the Denver Tech Center (in Greenwood Village). One of the local PBS stations used to be in Broomfield, and still claims a Broomfield address, but its studios are in Denver. KBDI-TV - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I know there are some exclusive suburbs. There are some here in metro Denver. But there are far more burbs where just "normal people" live, and where factories and other businesses locate.
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Old 01-07-2014, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,088 posts, read 22,943,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jalasno View Post
To me suburb means it's just not part of the major city. Not all suburbs are ritzy paradises full of high income earners. Some are middle class havens and some are just extensions of tha hood, especially some near the largest cities.
This is exactly what I was thinking when I read the title to this thread. Sub - urbs, are not urb - an.

Seems anything more is just over-analyzing.
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Old 01-07-2014, 10:16 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,799,113 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pantin23 View Post
I would say that there are actually 4-5 types of suburbs
-Streetcar suburbs (Victorian Era-WWI) which are usually inside of the city, and usually built up by WWI usually built in Victorian (Queen Anne) styles, in some cases, they are within walking distance of the city center
-interwar suburbs (1920s suburbs), suburbs of this interwar period usually built in Colonial, and Bungalow styles, could still be in the city, but more around the edge
-Post WWII suburbs (1940s-70s) these tend to share some characteristics of the prior and following suburbs. They are either laid out on a grid, or on a sort of curvy road grid (not quite cul-de-sacs yet). usually they tend to be mass produced ranchers, or cape cods. These suburbs tend to show some decline in recent years, as their commercial areas (usually strip malls) empty out. Lastly, they are usually completely out of the city except for some places such as Dallas, Houston, Charlotte
-Postmodern Suburbs (1970-) These are what most people would think of as a modern suburb (at least before the recession), usually laid out in a sort of jumbled network of cul-de-sacs, Shopping malls, office parks, etc. The houses tend to be a sort of discombobulated jumble of add-ons and wings with low quality construction (McMansions). They also lack almost any transit at all except for a few cases with regional rail, or express bus services that often service the previous two.
There were plenty of cul-de-sacs in the burbs before the 70s. In fact, I lived as a young kid in a house on a corner of a street and a cul-de-sac in the 60s in California. Cul-de-sacs even predate WWII in American planning.
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Old 01-07-2014, 11:23 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Sure I do. I was just posing the questions to someone who thinks that city and suburbs can be determined by the type of housing. Whether you live in a city or suburb is determined by the city limits.
The last sentence is your opinion. Others disagree, obviously. If someone thinks otherwise, the answer to your questions is irrelevant.
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Old 01-07-2014, 11:32 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Oh, for Pity's sake! Give examples of these burbs that don't allow factories or housing <$300K, other than maybe, Beverly Hills. Many cities have certain areas for dance clubs and other "questionable entertainment" or disallow them altogether. As I said, growing up in the Pittsburgh area, the steel mills were mainly outside the city limits. Some TV stations are actually located in the burbs.
Under $300k is an easy restriction for well off suburbs. Not because they're not allowed, but because no houses are that cheap. You'd have trouble finding a house that cheap in the fancier sections of Long Island, though you could get a condo. Though some might have few condos.

In any case, since in most American metros today, the majority of the population lives in the suburbs, they can't all be well off.
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