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Old 01-08-2014, 06:04 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
could it be that two different words that share the same root have different meanings? Is it possible?

Could a word have alternate definitions?

Is it just possible that "suburban" could be used as "of, relating to, or characteristic of a suburb?" Or "Of, relating to, or characteristic of the culture, customs, and manners of typical life in the suburbs?"

Or is this mind blowing concept beyond the grasp of your imagination?
Watch your keyboard, pal.

To discuss your actual issue rather than my imagination, although what my imagination has to do with this I don't know-

"Suburban" homes pertain to the suburbs. So we go full circle-what are the suburbs? We know the answer-anything the urbanists don't like.
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Old 01-08-2014, 06:35 PM
 
12,299 posts, read 15,196,725 times
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I am surprised nobody mentioned "good schools." Of course, being outside the reach of the Central City doesn't guarantee this. Some suburban schools are just as rotten as those in the City.
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Old 01-08-2014, 06:48 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
I am surprised nobody mentioned "good schools." Of course, being outside the reach of the Central City doesn't guarantee this. Some suburban schools are just as rotten as those in the City.
Most of these yuppies don't have kids, or they send their kids to private schools, or finagle their way into charter and magnet schools. They don't care about schools for anyone else other than their kids, if they have any.
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Old 01-08-2014, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,419 posts, read 11,926,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Most of these yuppies don't have kids, or they send their kids to private schools, or finagle their way into charter and magnet schools. They don't care about schools for anyone else other than their kids, if they have any.
Please explain to me what exactly urbanists are supposed to do to improve city schools. I mean, besides vote for higher taxes to pay for them (which they are generally more apt to do than many suburban school districts).
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Old 01-08-2014, 07:05 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Please explain to me what exactly urbanists are supposed to do to improve city schools. I mean, besides vote for higher taxes to pay for them (which they are generally more apt to do than many suburban school districts).
Doesn't work; urban schools funded at higher levels than suburban schools still do worse. Urbanists should do what they often insist suburbanites should do: stay in the city, have kids, send them to the public schools, and try and fix those schools themselves.
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Old 01-08-2014, 07:39 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,419 posts, read 11,926,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Doesn't work; urban schools funded at higher levels than suburban schools still do worse. Urbanists should do what they often insist suburbanites should do: stay in the city, have kids, send them to the public schools, and try and fix those schools themselves.
Whose to say they don't? I'm doing this myself.

Regardless, blaming "urbanists" for not staying in city schools seems silly to me. People who don't want kids don't want kids. People who move to the suburbs for better schools cease being "urbanists," and you can't blame the people who stay behind for their choice to leave. That leaves private schools and the like, which admittedly is an issue. I always advocate for people to stay in the public school system here in Pittsburgh myself.
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Old 01-08-2014, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Richmond/Philadelphia/Brooklyn
1,263 posts, read 1,273,264 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
There were plenty of cul-de-sacs in the burbs before the 70s. In fact, I lived as a young kid in a house on a corner of a street and a cul-de-sac in the 60s in California. Cul-de-sacs even predate WWII in American planning.
Yes I imagine that there are plenty of cul de sacs in some older suburbs, but they seem to be in virtually EVERY postmodern suburb, and almost characterize the post modern suburb, and also, some of the characteristics I mention may be in multiple types, I just put the characteristic with the suburb it truly defined nationally.
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Old 01-08-2014, 08:04 PM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,830,658 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pantin23 View Post
Yes I imagine that there are plenty of cul de sacs in some older suburbs, but they seem to be in virtually EVERY postmodern suburb, and almost characterize the post modern suburb, and also, some of the characteristics I mention may be in multiple types, I just put the characteristic with the suburb it truly defined nationally.
I've lived in areas with what you call "postmodern" (post-1970s) housing where most of the streets were through. A layout that's dendritic with cul-de-sac is common but not universal by any means. One or more long loops with cross streets is also a common layout, for instance. As is a main road with smaller loop streets -- I don't know if you'd consider that "cul de sac", as the loop streets generally either rejoin themselves near the main road, or they rejoin the main road near where they entered in a horseshoe shape.
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Old 01-08-2014, 08:10 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Please explain to me what exactly urbanists are supposed to do to improve city schools. I mean, besides vote for higher taxes to pay for them (which they are generally more apt to do than many suburban school districts).
We've discussed schools many times on this forum. I've posted links to urbanist mags where the the authors admit they never thought about city schools until they had their own kids. A lot of people on this forum are very young, and not even married/partnered, let alone parents. Most of them don't care about schools b/c they're not on the radar screen.

Most people did not like the ideas I suggested some time ago on another thread about schools here on Urban Planning.

Please show me some evidence that city people are more likely to vote to raise school taxes than suburban people.
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Old 01-08-2014, 09:31 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,967,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
We've discussed schools many times on this forum. I've posted links to urbanist mags where the the authors admit they never thought about city schools until they had their own kids. A lot of people on this forum are very young, and not even married/partnered, let alone parents. Most of them don't care about schools b/c they're not on the radar screen.
What are these childless people supposed to do? It's not like they're actively against education.
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