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Old 01-09-2014, 07:51 PM
 
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As long as the governments rewards suburbia, people won't pay extra money and suffer extra inconveniences of city living. My city is shrinking while its suburbs are thriving. This didn't happen because 'free market'. This is the work of FHA and a gang of other agencies with their 'home-ownership' programs. Thanks to them, America doesn't have cities anymore. Look what you did...
Shrinking cities in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 01-09-2014, 08:22 PM
 
56,637 posts, read 80,930,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Most of those are still fairly car oriented. Compared to say, a similar sized town in the UK, most are relatively pedestrian unfriendly, spread out with poor transit. It's also common for small cities to have much of the shopping, particularly the practical shopping, out on arterials by the edge of town which are hard to access on foot. British small cities have much less of this pattern, with only a few big box stores on the edge.
I understand what you are saying. It does occur to varying degrees here though in terms of how many things a person could walk to things and public transportation frequency. I was thinking of one village in my area that has a popular park, a library, a grocery store, a few banks, some restaurants, a couple of cafes, a few bars, a couple of schools, some churches, some stores, but also has about 2 or 3 bus lines that run through it as well.

A small city I was thinking about has bus service that runs pretty late for a city of its size(about 10-11 PM in a city of 18-19,000). It does have big box stores on the eastern edge of town, but it does have some shopping in its Downtown, with plenty of bars, some restaurants, a movie theater, a YMCA, a library, a grocery store, a bookstore and a couple of other things. It also has a college on the western edge of town too. There are several bus routes, along with a commuter bus to a bigger city.
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Old 01-10-2014, 05:45 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,896 posts, read 7,659,080 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by im_a_lawyer View Post
As long as the governments rewards suburbia, people won't pay extra money and suffer extra inconveniences of city living. My city is shrinking while its suburbs are thriving. This didn't happen because 'free market'. This is the work of FHA and a gang of other agencies with their 'home-ownership' programs. Thanks to them, America doesn't have cities anymore. Look what you did...
Shrinking cities in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Not to get further off-topic, but in NE Ohio, our population has remained steady at best. But we've expanded our footprint considerably.
Rust Wire » Blog Archive » Northeast Ohio’s Gathering Vacancy Storm
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Old 01-10-2014, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
Not to get further off-topic, but in NE Ohio, our population has remained steady at best. But we've expanded our footprint considerably.
Rust Wire » Blog Archive » Northeast Ohio’s Gathering Vacancy Storm
The land size of metros in Ohio is really sad, it is a state that could have really benefited from urban growth boundaries.
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Old 01-10-2014, 08:26 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,011 posts, read 102,621,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
You also have lots of people that still think that anything that isn't going to fund auto centric infrastructure is nothing more than a "boondoggle."
What is "auto centric" infrastructure?

Quote:
Originally Posted by im_a_lawyer View Post
As long as the governments rewards suburbia, people won't pay extra money and suffer extra inconveniences of city living. My city is shrinking while its suburbs are thriving. This didn't happen because 'free market'. This is the work of FHA and a gang of other agencies with their 'home-ownership' programs. Thanks to them, America doesn't have cities anymore. Look what you did...
Shrinking cities in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"Reward suburbia", LOL! And no, I'm not about to "suffer" any inconvenience I don't have to for some philosophical kick! We've discussed the FHA before. You may do a search. Your list of shrinking cities is not impressive. Many cities are growing.
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Old 01-10-2014, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,528,523 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
What is "auto centric" infrastructure?



"Reward suburbia", LOL! And no, I'm not about to "suffer" any inconvenience I don't have to for some philosophical kick! We've discussed the FHA before. You may do a search. Your list of shrinking cities is not impressive. Many cities are growing.
Auto centric infrastructure is most American cities that are built around the car first. Hampton Roads, VA is a great example of this, much of that metro was built after 1963.
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Old 01-10-2014, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Richmond/Philadelphia/Brooklyn
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LOL! DC is in that Shrinking Cities list when (last time I checked) It's been growing by 10,000 residents per year!
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Old 01-10-2014, 04:15 PM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,194,850 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pantin23 View Post
LOL! DC is in that Shrinking Cities list when (last time I checked) It's been growing by 10,000 residents per year!
Washington DC peaked in population in 1950 at 800,000.
Between 1950 and 2000 it dropped to 570,000.

SINCE 2000 it has grown by 40,000 +/-
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Old 01-10-2014, 04:33 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,979,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pantin23 View Post
LOL! DC is in that Shrinking Cities list when (last time I checked) It's been growing by 10,000 residents per year!
Yes. The shrinking cities is shrank compared to peak population, small gains in the last decade don't make up for a general decline. But population decline stats aren't that informative. A number of European cities including some that good press among "urbanists" show large declines as well:

Quote:
Originally Posted by im_a_lawyer View Post
As long as the governments rewards suburbia, people won't pay extra money and suffer extra inconveniences of city living. My city is shrinking while its suburbs are thriving. This didn't happen because 'free market'. This is the work of FHA and a gang of other agencies with their 'home-ownership' programs. Thanks to them, America doesn't have cities anymore. Look what you did...
Shrinking cities in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
population loss from peak

Paris: -21% [peaked in 1954]
Barcelona: -12% [peaked in 1979, Spain urbanized late]
Copenhagen: -27% [peaked in 1950]
Milan: -22% [peaked in 1971]
Manchester: -41% [peaked in 1930]
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Old 01-10-2014, 05:54 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,011 posts, read 102,621,396 times
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Some population loss comes from decreased family size over the years.
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