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Old 01-11-2014, 08:18 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 27 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,034 posts, read 102,707,476 times
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^^Did you read anything in my post other than the word "libertarian"? I said "inner libertarian". I am not a member of the Libertarian Party; I am a registered Democrat for God's sake! But, I can think. I also said I'm fine with publicly supported transport as long as the taxpayers vote for it. I have voted for transportation taxes here in the metro Denver area, even though I rarely use it.

I have also worked with the elderly and disabled in my career as a registered nurse, also the blind and any other disability you can think of! I happen to know that peoplewith disabilities qualify for special transit services that able bodied people cannot use, and rightly so. My own mother used special transit when she lived with us shortly before she died. I do have an issue with these young urbanites who want public transportation that is as convenient as driving a car, if not moreso with no parking hassles involved. And they can't ride a bus, they have to have a freaking train!

I am not a member of the Tea Party and I thank you not to make such an assumption! I've never seen you here on CD before! You know nothing about me.

There is nothing wrong with my neurons; what's wrong with yours to make such assumptions about someone you have never conversed with before?
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Old 01-12-2014, 12:05 AM
 
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No. NYC is the only U.S. city with a "European level of transit" right now, and I don't see this changing in the future. Granted, DC, Chicago, SF, Boston and Philly have good transit too, but not really similar to NYC or major European cities.
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Old 01-12-2014, 07:29 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichiVegas View Post
No. NYC is the only U.S. city with a "European level of transit" right now, and I don't see this changing in the future. Granted, DC, Chicago, SF, Boston and Philly have good transit too, but not really similar to NYC or major European cities.
che cosa?

Unless you're being a mode snob I don't think there's an important difference between the LOS you get in Chicago or Boston vs. a lot of other european cities. It's going to take me just as long to get across town in Philly as in Rome.

The difference is in the built environment which influences mode choices to an enormous degree. A lot more people use transit in Europe than in North America and of course, even in a city of 1 million in Europe you can expect a robust transit network. That's a rare exception in NA.
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Old 01-12-2014, 08:39 PM
 
Location: East coast
613 posts, read 894,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drive carephilly View Post
The difference is in the built environment which influences mode choices to an enormous degree. A lot more people use transit in Europe than in North America and of course, even in a city of 1 million in Europe you can expect a robust transit network. That's a rare exception in NA.
Yeah, basically what I was getting at was whether or not there will be this kind of built environment more common in the near future in the US. From what I see or hear though, there's still too much controversy and politics over it to make it really that feasible on that scale in many cities, but one can still hope.

I don't care for all cities to be this way, not everyone has to like this car-free or car-lite lifestyle, but I'd like to at least have some more cities built or designed this way in the country as an option.
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Old 01-12-2014, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,714,577 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Agreed. In years past, such trains/buses were privately run. As ridership declined, the government took them over. My inner Libertarian says why should the govt. provide transportation? Now, mind you, I'm not opposed to publicly funded transportation, as long as the citizens being taxed get to vote on it. But I do think some of these public transit activists who want service every 10 minutes (as has been suggested on these forums, though probably not by you) need to take another thought about this. Just what IS the govt's responsibility in regard to transporting people?
I think of transit as infrastructure like roads. Roads transport people as well, should the government stop funding roads too?

Where is the line?

Everyone wins with better transportation/mobility options. Car drivers have less congested streets. Non drivers can get around.....
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Old 07-14-2015, 06:08 PM
 
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I recall-on The Fourth Turning forum-comments by an American who had lived in Russia:

1. Pedestrian cities were built by pedestrian cultures (which were such by default before mechanized transportation).

2. In a city built as a pedestrian city, mass transit is an aid to the pedestrian, rather than being a thing unto itself.
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Old 07-14-2015, 07:47 PM
 
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The U.S.A. lacks a strong tradition of city living. There may be two candidate populations for a more urban future:

1. Urban-philes/Urbanistas. A small minority, I believe. An estimate I saw was 10% of the population.

2. On another thread it was mentioned people who aren't interested in urbanity, as such, but would like to live near amenities. Would this be a niche group?

Figure out how many of these two groups live in a metropolitan area, to figure out how much more urbanization is needed to accommodate them. This may amount to a relatively small area of the old central city. So, no, unlike urban planners/critics I don't envision a large scale transformation of most cities.
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Old 07-14-2015, 07:52 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,048,502 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Randal Walker View Post
The U.S.A. lacks a strong tradition of city living.
Does it? The US is newer, but in say 1900 or 1940, the percent living in urban areas was similar to Europe (which varied greatly by country). Particularly if the south is excluded. The difference was that except for a few larger American cities, they already quite a bit less dense than European cities. And mass car ownership arrived earlier in the US.
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Old 07-15-2015, 12:08 PM
 
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Great thread! This is almost a complement to the one I created on here about public transportation.

Earlier on this thread someone mentioned the concern re: crime being worse in areas where there are trains because criminals will just use the public transport to get off & back on quickly. This is a legitimate concern. I have also seen mentally ill/unstable people on public transportation on a regular basis.

That being said, IMHO taking the train typically beats driving - of course, I'm someone who hates driving...
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Old 07-15-2015, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
2,610 posts, read 3,766,726 times
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I still doubt that public transit will make it easier for criminals to commit crime. Most serious criminals will have a car at their disposal. I guess you could argue that it would bring in lower income or mentally ill/unstable people since they are less likely to have access to a car, and that criminals will follow, but even then I doubt trains are any different from other public transit. In Montreal one of the higher crime areas is Montreal-Nord and it lacks subway service.

In Toronto, there seems to be no correlation whatsoever between places with subway service vs places with just bus service having more crime. Neighbourhoods around the Yonge Subway north of Downtown have some of the lowest crime rates in the city, and areas around the Bloor-Danforth subway in Etobicoke have pretty low crime too. The University-Spadina line and more central portion of the Bloor-Danforth subway have average to slightly above average crime. Meanwhile many of the neighbourhoods with the highest crime rates in Toronto have no subway. Even within Downtown Toronto, the neighbourhood with the highest crime rate (Moss Park-Dundas E-Regent Park area) is one of the parts of Downtown that is furthest from the subway.
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