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Old 07-17-2015, 11:07 AM
 
391 posts, read 209,373 times
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as long as there's demand for it, it will be built. As for that demand, it's definitely increasing.
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Old 07-17-2015, 11:20 AM
 
2,293 posts, read 1,312,065 times
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Regarding U.S. metropolitan areas….

Given that we live in an auto-centric/suburban age, it is hard to believe that we will get more than a moderate increase in walkable/urban areas in particular, and walkable areas in general.


I can imagine developers trying to exploit "walkability" by promoting faux urbanism.

Last edited by Tim Randal Walker; 07-17-2015 at 11:36 AM..
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Old 07-17-2015, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Asheville
343 posts, read 578,659 times
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What I don't understand is I promote a walkable areas in forums from Cities I've lived in, currently live in and cities I am thinking about moving to. I get blasted with negativity when I mention it. But, the areas that have better walking scores are the most expensive places to buy a home in any city in America. I don't understand why people are blasting me when I suggest they build more types of these areas. Our home values would go up if they did. CONFUSED!!!!
Currently live in a small growing town in the Suburbs of Charlotte that has lots of opportunity for a good walk score if they build it with that intent.

Last edited by chrharris; 07-17-2015 at 06:14 PM.. Reason: added current city
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Old 07-17-2015, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Asheville
343 posts, read 578,659 times
Reputation: 284
Quote:
Originally Posted by im_a_lawyer View Post
Under the current government policies, suburban lifestyle is at an advantage. Is that fair? No. Then let's change it.



Obviously new housing had to be built... the problem is how drastically different the new cities and communities are and it's all for the worst.
That is one Ugly Picture. That is the way it is everywhere now. It's horrible to see but the cheap housing developers are taking over all cities and making them all look like the same development built over and over and over. We, the Americans keep buying them because their cheap and they make it easy to buy them. Just like Big Box Stores, cheap and easy. This is the new America. Its like an infection that you can't stop.
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