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Old 01-28-2014, 12:14 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,985 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33045

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^^OK, up there on the coast of Oregon! It's clear you don't understand water policy in places that have to irrigate. Agriculture is not always the best use of the land.
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Old 01-28-2014, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,057 posts, read 16,066,811 times
Reputation: 12635
Nope, I just live in reality. There's never been a shortage of arable land in the West, especially in California, and especially in the Central Valley. What there's always been a shortage of is water. And urban water use is pretty low. Even in the San Joaquin Valley where I live we're not really running out of arable farm land due to development. We're the most extreme case. We produce most of the crops in the state. Not the most of any region but the most period. It's almost all prime agricultural land. We're one of the fastest growing regions. Specifically, I live in San Joaquin County. We're mostly farmland. 90% of the county is unincorporated, and of the 90%, 80% is ag. Less than 5% of unincorporated land is residential, mostly your 1-20 acre residential zoning, much of which is farmed.
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Old 01-28-2014, 09:58 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
One thing the article doesn't mention is Connecticut has kinda screwy city incorporation rules, although in practice they seldom matter today.

Essentially, cities incorporate within towns. So a city begins as a subsection of a town, having a separate government but also subordinate to town government. In all cases but Groton towns and cities have been consolidated.

Stamford had a very late consolidation, however. The northern portion was still the "Town of Stamford" until 1949. So it basically missed out on urban-style development entirely, and instead became full of estates for millionaires. North Stamford is actually wealthier than Greenwich on the whole. There's not a snowball's chance in hell it will get redeveloped.
Odd, I assume city incorporation worked similar to Massachusetts, where you can't have a city within a town; all a city is a town that changes its government organization.

Extreme large lot zoning looks rather common in Fairfield County. Nassau County on Long Island has some of that, too. The extreme low densities of the northeastern part of the county relative to the rest of the county must be being preserved at least in part by lot size rules. I'd guess the bright orange in the southern part of the county is probably mostly detached homes with about a 7500 sq ft lot size average, some a bit less. Those in turn are protected from becoming Queens-like densities by their own regulations. When they were both initially built, I suspect lot size rules didn't determine what was built; rather the towns set the lot size rules to whatever had already been built.

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Old 01-29-2014, 12:26 AM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,223 posts, read 12,487,684 times
Reputation: 19369
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
^^OK, up there on the coast of Oregon! It's clear you don't understand water policy in places that have to irrigate. Agriculture is not always the best use of the land.
You apparently don't realize how irrational it is to try to use agriculture as a justification for urban sprawl.
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Old 01-29-2014, 06:40 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,985 posts, read 102,540,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
You apparently don't realize how irrational it is to try to use agriculture as a justification for urban sprawl.
"Sprawl" is in the eye of the beholder. People do have to live somewhere.
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Old 01-29-2014, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,749,193 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
"Sprawl" is in the eye of the beholder. People do have to live somewhere.
Sprawl is in all of our eyes. And it's ugly.
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Old 01-30-2014, 06:11 AM
 
1,110 posts, read 908,024 times
Reputation: 1201
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Sprawl is in all of our eyes. And it's ugly.
To each his own, I guess. "Sprawl" definitely has some benefits.
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Old 01-30-2014, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,749,193 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orlando-calrissian View Post
To each his own, I guess. "Sprawl" definitely has some benefits.
No it doesn't.
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Old 01-30-2014, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,057 posts, read 16,066,811 times
Reputation: 12635
Well, usually the schools are usually better. That's not inherently a benefit of sprawl, but I'd take good schools over being able to walk to an overpriced bodega in the same amount of time it takes me to drive to a supermarket with better quality, better selection, and better prices.
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Old 01-30-2014, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,749,193 times
Reputation: 8803
That has nothing to do with sprawl. Good parents make good schools. Good schools don't just grow out of the ground. Walmart has good quality? LOL In my experience, you find much better quality at smaller stores, no matter the location. You will find cheaper prices in any chain, regardless of the location.
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