U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-08-2014, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,726,438 times
Reputation: 32304

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
.... 1-2 miles is a 20-40 minute walk....
A mile in 20 minutes is three miles per hour. I am 69 and my normal walking pace up a 3% incline on the treadmill is 4.7 miles per hour, which I have no trouble maintaining for 45 minutes. I consider my fitness level to be pathetically low. Even allowing for delays waiting for traffic lights, who are the people who take 20 minutes to walk just one mile?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-08-2014, 04:03 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,988 posts, read 102,554,590 times
Reputation: 33051
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
The same is true in Pittsburgh. Roughly equal numbers of people commute to downtown via bus or light rail as drive, because parking is scarce (and expensive).

This is exactly the reason why if your goal as a city is to have a financially sustainable transit system, you shouldn't continue to expand the number of parking spaces in downtown.
Most cities have lots of goals, economic vitality being one of them. All this "If you make it hard for people to drive, they won't" didn't work too well for Boulder, CO. Yes, someone, on some thread posted some stats about Boulder (I think on Pittsburgh so you may have seen it) and biking to work did increase significantly, but no other alternative transportation did so. Mostly people just figure out ways around the parking restrictions in Boulder.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2014, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,650,120 times
Reputation: 26646
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
A mile in 20 minutes is three miles per hour. I am 69 and my normal walking pace up a 3% incline on the treadmill is 4.7 miles per hour, which I have no trouble maintaining for 45 minutes. I consider my fitness level to be pathetically low. Even allowing for delays waiting for traffic lights, who are the people who take 20 minutes to walk just one mile?
3mph is a totally typical pace. When you are walking on your treadmill you are in the mind for "sport." You probably have your tennis shoes on, and your comfy clothing. When you are in your work clothing. (And shoes) more typical is 15-20 minutes. 4.7 mph is speedy for normal pace. That is more like "exercise" pace.

When "walking with purpose" most people go about 4mph. Walking for leisure is more like 3mph or less.
http://walking.about.com/od/workouts...sk-Walking.htm

CDC defines brisk as anything over 3mph.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2014, 04:23 PM
 
900 posts, read 794,060 times
Reputation: 624
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Actually BRT benefits the existing riders the most (unlike light rail), since it speeds up the trips for people forced to go long distances. "Choice riders" rarely ride more than 1-2 miles via transit (outside of commuter rail of course)
Choice riders rarely ride buses for more than a few miles, because they're buses. They are typically far more willing to take urban rail transit--not just suburban commuter trains-- because this form of mass transit typically offers definite and quantitative advantages over the option of driving oneself, in that one avoids the hassle and delay of traffic and the expense of parking. On the other hand, my experience in L.A. suggests that passengers on the rail system are still mostly transit dependent, rather than choice riders.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2014, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,061 posts, read 16,066,811 times
Reputation: 12635
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
The same is true in Pittsburgh. Roughly equal numbers of people commute to downtown via bus or light rail as drive, because parking is scarce (and expensive).

This is exactly the reason why if your goal as a city is to have a financially sustainable transit system, you shouldn't continue to expand the number of parking spaces in downtown.
1) Why's that? Needlessly aggravating drivers for no reason is apt to **** off the public which is where most transit systems get the majority of their funding.

2) Using Pittsburgh as example of a sustainable public transit system is pretty hilarious considering it's been bailed out by the state and has had massive service cuts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2014, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,726,438 times
Reputation: 32304
Default O.K., you are right on this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
3mph is a totally typical pace. When you are walking on your treadmill you are in the mind for "sport." You probably have your tennis shoes on, and your comfy clothing. When you are in your work clothing. (And shoes) more typical is 15-20 minutes. 4.7 mph is speedy for normal pace. That is more like "exercise" pace.

When "walking with purpose" most people go about 4mph. Walking for leisure is more like 3mph or less.
How Fast is a Brisk Walking Pace?

CDC defines brisk as anything over 3mph.
You seem to have actual data on walking speeds, so I must concede that you are correct. However I would say that even with a dress shirt and a tie and work shoes my normal walking pace is at least four miles per hour. I am a staunch believer that every single opportunity for a bit of physical activity should be taken advantage of. I am following the language of the American College of Sports Medicine in differentiating physical activity (low intensity) from exercise (higher intensity). I actually prefer brisk walking (over 4 mph) and find it more enjoyable. I would say the CDC is setting the bar shamefully low - a desperate plea to a nation of couch potatoes. But if people want to consider that they are engaging in "brisk" walking at 3.1 mph, at least their delusion has an authoritative source of legitimacy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2014, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,650,120 times
Reputation: 26646
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
You seem to have actual data on walking speeds, so I must concede that you are correct. However I would say that even with a dress shirt and a tie and work shoes my normal walking pace is at least four miles per hour. I am a staunch believer that every single opportunity for a bit of physical activity should be taken advantage of. I am following the language of the American College of Sports Medicine in differentiating physical activity (low intensity) from exercise (higher intensity). I actually prefer brisk walking (over 4 mph) and find it more enjoyable. I would say the CDC is setting the bar shamefully low - a desperate plea to a nation of couch potatoes. But if people want to consider that they are engaging in "brisk" walking at 3.1 mph, at least their delusion has an authoritative source of legitimacy.
It is infinitely easier to walk a sustained 4mph in men's dress shoes vs women's. That's for sure. I typically hit 17 minutes if I am by myself in work clothes and 20 minutes when in a group (chatting puts everyone at a slower pace). Above 15 minutes is "brisk" and means I am thinking about keeping a faster pace.

But being completely honest, lots of people don't want to walk anywhere near a mile "for fun."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2014, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,726,438 times
Reputation: 32304
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
It is infinitely easier to walk a sustained 4mph in men's dress shoes vs women's. That's for sure. I typically hit 17 minutes if I am by myself in work clothes and 20 minutes when in a group (chatting puts everyone at a slower pace). Above 15 minutes is "brisk" and means I am thinking about keeping a faster pace.

But being completely honest, lots of people don't want to walk anywhere near a mile "for fun."
Jeeze, I didn't even think about women in heels. Well of course that's going to be quite a limitation, and I take back everything remotely critical I said if we are talking about women in heels. I do feel sorry for women, as I can't blame them for following society's expectations for business attire, but I find those expectations irrational and unfortunate. I take it you are female?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2014, 06:49 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,901,398 times
Reputation: 18049
Looks to me like we have been subsidizing urban ghetto projects most since the 60's.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2014, 07:31 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee Ex-ex-ex-urbs
358 posts, read 415,502 times
Reputation: 725
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
A mile in 20 minutes is three miles per hour. I am 69 and my normal walking pace up a 3% incline on the treadmill is 4.7 miles per hour, which I have no trouble maintaining for 45 minutes. I consider my fitness level to be pathetically low. Even allowing for delays waiting for traffic lights, who are the people who take 20 minutes to walk just one mile?
Me.

Walking on exercise equipment is no comparison to walking on the Earth.

I have walked the distance from my store to the far train station dozens of times and at a fair pace it takes me an hour to go the three miles. The terrain isn't smooth and it isn't flat. Walking on soft earth and grass isn't the same as a treadmill.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top