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Old 02-08-2014, 08:14 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Most cities have lots of goals, economic vitality being one of them. All this "If you make it hard for people to drive, they won't" didn't work too well for Boulder, CO. Yes, someone, on some thread posted some stats about Boulder (I think on Pittsburgh so you may have seen it) and biking to work did increase significantly, but no other alternative transportation did so. Mostly people just figure out ways around the parking restrictions in Boulder.
I don't know much about the specifics of Boulder's situation, but generally commutes to downtowns get the highest transit ridership. One of the reasons, as OhioGirl81 said, is a lack of convenient or cheap parking. Adding more convenient/cheap parking would almost certainly decrease transit ridership as some who were on transit merely to avoid a parking pain shifted to driving. Generally, downtowns with the least convenient parking tend to have the highest transit ridership. Also, is it "making it hard" for people to drive or just "not making it easier to drive"?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
1) Why's that? Needlessly aggravating drivers for no reason is apt to **** off the public which is where most transit systems get the majority of their funding.

2) Using Pittsburgh as example of a sustainable public transit system is pretty hilarious considering it's been bailed out by the state and has had massive service cuts.
As to (1), Boston has restricted the number of parking spaces that can be built downtown for the last thirty years. Manhattan does something similar. A city that builds more parking downtown and funds lots of transit is throwing money away.
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Old 02-08-2014, 10:33 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,061 posts, read 16,070,870 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
As to (1), Boston has restricted the number of parking spaces that can be built downtown for the last thirty years. Manhattan does something similar. A city that builds more parking downtown and funds lots of transit is throwing money away.
Why?

Parking is a cash cow. It's 18% in Manhattan. NYC also collects more in toll revenue from those driving into Manhattan than the entire NYCDOT spends on roads. It's the complete opposite. You can scalp a driver for ~$75-$100/mo in parking taxes in the financial district plus all that delicious toll money.

The problem with more parking in Manhattan is road capacity.
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Old 02-09-2014, 06:35 PM
 
12,291 posts, read 15,187,836 times
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Many suburbs subsidize some development. For example burying utilities for a proposed shopping mall or rebating some sales taxes. I suppose central cities do as well. And whether you drive or use transit, you are subsidized. I suppose that encourages longer commutes.

Last edited by pvande55; 02-09-2014 at 06:38 PM.. Reason: Add lines
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Old 02-11-2014, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,223 posts, read 12,491,644 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
A mile in 20 minutes is three miles per hour. I am 69 and my normal walking pace up a 3% incline on the treadmill is 4.7 miles per hour, which I have no trouble maintaining for 45 minutes. I consider my fitness level to be pathetically low. Even allowing for delays waiting for traffic lights, who are the people who take 20 minutes to walk just one mile?
You need to recalibrate your treadmill. Back when people walked places, they measured distance in leagues, which was how far the Roman army could march in an hour. A league is 2.7 miles, and you have to step right out to keep that pace, which is a 22 minute mile. 4.7 mph is a pretty good jogging pace. That's a 12 minute mile.
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Old 02-11-2014, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
You need to recalibrate your treadmill. Back when people walked places, they measured distance in leagues, which was how far the Roman army could march in an hour. A league is 2.7 miles, and you have to step right out to keep that pace, which is a 22 minute mile. 4.7 mph is a pretty good jogging pace. That's a 12 minute mile.
It also depends on how long one's legs are, too. Maybe Escort Rider is 6'-7" with long legs?
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Old 02-12-2014, 02:17 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Another perspective on how zoning discourages development. Apparently cities like Seattle and Austin are mostly zoned for single family residential....making it impossibly to build anything else other than in a few areas.

Old Urbanist: The Zoning Straitjacket, Part II
Here's another for Chicago!

The Urbanophile Blog Archive Chicago Zoning: It’s Just Insane by Daniel Hertz

Most of the city's area only deatched homes can be legally built.
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Old 09-03-2014, 11:38 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
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Subsidizing sprawl often starts innocently enough.

This article was in today's paper:
Youngstown News, Local, county and state officials try to bring natural gas lines to residents of Poland Township
About 25-30 people want the gas company to provide them service. The gas company says sure, we'll let you know how much it will cost, when everyone sends in their application. But, we have local and state reps falling all over each other, trying to find other funding sources, (mostly taxpayer funded sources) so that these people don't have to pay to have gas service extended to their property.

Here is a street view from the location in question:
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Po...226455c35759d8

I don't have a problem with helping these people get access to a cheaper, cleaner heating source, per se. But, once this area gets gas service, it's more likely that developers will try to buy some of the larger properties (like the farm I captured in the street view) and build some McMansions. After more development takes place, traffic on this 2-lane road will start to become an issue. So, ODOT will have to widen the road. As population density increase, retail and service business will locate here, and more infrastructure will be needed. (traffic lights, street lights, water service(?), etc.)

To add insult to injury, this is in a shrinking metro. So, this theoretical new development only pulls people away from existing population centers, making them weaker.
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Old 09-03-2014, 01:53 PM
 
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Quote:
A league is 2.7 miles, and you have to step right out to keep that pace, which is a 22 minute mile. 4.7 mph is a pretty good jogging pace. That's a 12 minute mile.
A 22 minute mile would probably be about right, if we consider the full scope of potential walkers - ie, those with bone, joint, and other mobility issues. For your average person without health issues, it's on the slow end.

People also walk at different speeds in different parts of the US (NYC faster than Indianapolis), and tends to correlate to income (wealthier people walk faster).

Last edited by TheOverdog; 09-03-2014 at 02:06 PM..
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Old 09-03-2014, 10:58 PM
 
2,941 posts, read 3,857,480 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Here's another for Chicago!

The Urbanophile Blog Archive Chicago Zoning: Its Just Insane by Daniel Hertz

Most of the city's area only deatched homes can be legally built.
Not quite. They just don't allow anything over four floors which is fine by me. Last thing I want is lots of large buildings blocking the sunlight and to be frank there is only limited demand for buildings of that size not to mention issues with parking(cause they won't be nearly as car free as they think), crowding and noise.
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Old 09-04-2014, 05:28 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,985 posts, read 41,937,844 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Not quite. They just don't allow anything over four floors which is fine by me. Last thing I want is lots of large buildings blocking the sunlight and to be frank there is only limited demand for buildings of that size not to mention issues with parking(cause they won't be nearly as car free as they think), crowding and noise.
That's still rather extreme for 96% of the city. In any case, the link says 2/3rds of the city is zoned for single-family homes only
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