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Old 01-25-2014, 04:58 PM
 
3,463 posts, read 4,550,815 times
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In the past five states I've lived other than Vermont, developers have bought and paid for the local government, from council, to zoning boards, to finance committees. Of course we are subsidizing sprawl. Its developer welfare at this point. Go to any zoning or variance hearing and see who wins. Then, go to your annual budget meeting and see who gets to pay for that 'win'.
Developers are a cancer to our society. We are paying for their assaults on our states in many ways.
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Old 01-25-2014, 05:19 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,038 posts, read 102,742,261 times
Reputation: 33084
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
According to the local multiplier study, there is a difference in local circulation of revenue. Here are a couple of interesting diagrams:

http://www.amiba.net/assets/images/I...urn-hi-res.jpg

http://www.amiba.net/assets/images/G...013-hi-res.jpg

Here's the full article: AMIBA | Local Multiplier Effect

I can say that while there are good big box stores out there (e.g. Costcos), I've yet to find one that treats me the same as a local establishment. The places I frequent are almost all local at this point, and pretty much every one of them knows my name, the neighborhood I live in, etc. One of the restaurants I frequent sends me home with a nice bottle of wine at the holidays. My local grocery store holds on to my favorite eggs when they come in, because they know I like them. When I used to shop at the larger stores (just as frequently in the past), I hardly ever knew anyone, much less got the same treatment.

That's not to say big box stores are bad. IMO they just aren't as good.
LOL! If I ever need a PR firm, I'm going to hire Costco's. They have people believing they're some non-profit in business for the public good instead of a profit-making company in business to make money.

My spouse goes to Home Depot frequently and the staff know him well.
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Old 01-25-2014, 05:29 PM
 
9,522 posts, read 14,869,898 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
I can say that while there are good big box stores out there (e.g. Costcos), I've yet to find one that treats me the same as a local establishment.
You mean they have the stuff out where you can see it? They don't treat you like an idiot because you don't know the exact term for what you're looking for, including brand and size? (or worse, because you DO know the term but there's a local name for it that's used instead). They actually have stock, instead of telling you "Yeah, we can order that. We only order on Wednesdays and it should take about a week after that; we'll need you to pay now"?
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Old 01-25-2014, 07:03 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,070,148 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
The cost of sprawl varies with the area. Land in South Texas or Arizona is worthless, so sprawl has minimal long term costs. OTOH, 60% of California's great Central Valley is now out of agricultural production thanks to decades of urban sprawl, which results in hundreds of millions of dollars of economic loss every year.
60% of the Central Valley is developed?! It sure doesn't look like that from a map. Got a source?

That'd be 13,500 square miles consumed by sprawl, almost three times the NYC urban area.
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Old 01-25-2014, 07:16 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,070,148 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
The Central Valley just doesn't have much population so we're in this weird position where we're horribly wasteful of water while always complaining about the urban areas taking water out of our fields.
Wikipedia says the Central Valley has 6.5 million people, which if it were it's own state, would be around the same size as the second largest western state by population.

As for agriculture, one of the more bizarre crops California grows is rice. It needs to be flooded during its growing (the warm) season, the time when California gets zero rain. I suppose relying on irrigation isn't an issue since the mountains can store so much water. Works fine, except in the rare instance you get no precipitation to create water storage. Like this year...

Are lawn watering restrictions in place yet?

http://www.mercurynews.com/science/c...ve-lasted-more
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Old 01-25-2014, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,456 posts, read 11,963,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by james777 View Post
No, not false, that is true. You need to look at the zoning codes of the towns in Pennsylvania. They do a great job of zoning out business and making one's property worthless by restricting the use of the building and parking regulations. Then they take it one step further by downzoning commercial buildings by giving notice to the owner in the form of a snail mail letter. The owner sells the building and claims he knows nothing about the new zoning, as does the listing agent. The sucker that buys the building now has a building that is severely limited as to what it can be used for, and most likely cannot be rented because of the parking restrictions.

This is just one big reason why business has left the rust belt for greener pastures in the southern states, or overseas. One can blame lower labor costs, but don't overlook the restrictions placed on land use by the crooked local politicians. You won't read about this in the media because the journalists are quite cozy with the local politicians. Besides, people don't want to have to walk far after they parked their car.
Do you mean the townships in Pennsylvania?

Personally speaking, I think Pennsylvania does far better from an "urban planning" standpoint than most states, because there are so many small cities and boroughs which were built up long before 1945, and had walkable commercial zones. Although in some cases they are quite blighted, every one pretty much has a few of these "classic towns" - and since they control their own zoning they usually have not been urban renewed into oblivion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Not surprising for Pittsburgh! Hair salons are a type of business usually allowed in residential, as long as the hairdresser has no employees. I can't imagine how a bar nor art gallery would get enough customers to stay in business.
The hairdresser has employees. She ran a popular salon downtown before she relocated to my neighborhood.

That gallery is now closing, but my understanding is it's because the owner of the building is selling. Another one is still open however.

Pittsburgh has the largest number of bars per capita in the country. The bar I linked to is the lesbian hangout in the neighborhood, but it's not that exclusively. The neighborhood has several others. Mostly these are local dives that neighborhood folks go to.

In the back streets there are several other examples, such as a restaurant and a personal trainer. There are also a number of businesses too new to show street views of - a trendy clothing store, a market (in the works), an architecture office, and some nonprofits. Not to mention some of the old industrial businesses of the neighborhood, like garages, and even a few remaining light manufacturing places.

Really, there's far, far more stuff on the main commercial street. But the residential blocks are not strictly residential.
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Old 01-25-2014, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,089 posts, read 16,121,723 times
Reputation: 12673
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Wikipedia says the Central Valley has 6.5 million people, which if it were it's own state, would be around the same size as the second largest western state by population.

As for agriculture, one of the more bizarre crops California grows is rice. It needs to be flooded during its growing (the warm) season, the time when California gets zero rain. I suppose relying on irrigation isn't an issue since the mountains can store so much water. Works fine, except in the rare instance you get no precipitation to create water storage. Like this year...

Are lawn watering restrictions in place yet?

California drought: Past dry periods have lasted more than 200 years, scientists say - San Jose Mercury News
Exactly right. There's fewer people in the entire Central Valley than in one county. Greater LA has 3x the population. If we want to use twice as much of our water, we damn well will. It's LA's fault there's not enough

Nope.

They won't be here unless the drought continues on for maybe 2-3 more years. We've been pumping our excess water into the aquifer for the last decade, so we're golden. The rest of the state may not be, but as far as urban use there's no shortage locally.
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Old 01-25-2014, 09:23 PM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
5,311 posts, read 5,343,644 times
Reputation: 3562
Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
You mean they have the stuff out where you can see it? They don't treat you like an idiot because you don't know the exact term for what you're looking for, including brand and size? (or worse, because you DO know the term but there's a local name for it that's used instead). They actually have stock, instead of telling you "Yeah, we can order that. We only order on Wednesdays and it should take about a week after that; we'll need you to pay now"?
Sounds like therapy may be in order here.
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Old 01-26-2014, 01:53 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,726,427 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
I see. So the chain stores' community involvement - encouraging volunteerism, giving in-kind donations, and providing cash donations - isn't good enough for you?

And these businesses that do a wonderful job of "local sourcing" - how many thousands of dollars do they provide to nonprofits in charitable donations? How many volunteers?

You're mixing apples and oranges, and forgetting that a local economy is a delicate balance of apples, oranges, pears and bananas as well. One business does not have to provide the entire fruit basket in order for it to contribute to the local economy.
The stuff you are talking about is just individual people doing nice things. Chains do not buy from local vendors/distributors/manufacturers. All dollars that go back into the local economy. The volunteer stuff is basically like sprinkles on the cake. Not even as important as icing. Big companies tend to give back very little in terms of percentage of revenue.

Let's go back to my coffee shop example. We've got a local place and a Starbucks bout a block apart.

The local place tapped a local t-shirt maker to design their shirts, they roast their beans in town, the use milk from a farm in the region, their bread comes from a local bakery. Their deli meat is from a local source, they use local chocolate and a local tea blender.

Starbucks uses tea produced in Seattle ..or used to be produced there. Milk that is not local. Baked goods from who knows where. Uniforms from their national,distributor....see the math here?

My local coffees hop has a huge local supplier multiplier, and keeps lots of local places in business. Starbucks doesn't. No matter how many bake sales they sponsor....
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Old 01-26-2014, 07:38 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,038 posts, read 102,742,261 times
Reputation: 33084
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
The stuff you are talking about is just individual people doing nice things. Chains do not buy from local vendors/distributors/manufacturers. All dollars that go back into the local economy. The volunteer stuff is basically like sprinkles on the cake. Not even as important as icing. Big companies tend to give back very little in terms of percentage of revenue.

Let's go back to my coffee shop example. We've got a local place and a Starbucks bout a block apart.

The local place tapped a local t-shirt maker to design their shirts, they roast their beans in town, the use milk from a farm in the region, their bread comes from a local bakery. Their deli meat is from a local source, they use local chocolate and a local tea blender.

Starbucks uses tea produced in Seattle ..or used to be produced there. Milk that is not local. Baked goods from who knows where. Uniforms from their national,distributor....see the math here?

My local coffees hop has a huge local supplier multiplier, and keeps lots of local places in business. Starbucks doesn't. No matter how many bake sales they sponsor....
Mom and Pops in general don't buy from local suppliers, either. You can give an example of a coffee shop, but any general merchandise place orders their stuff from China just like Walmart. How do you know all this stuff about the local coffee shop? Have you verified that they use all this local stuff? Just curious.
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