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Old 01-29-2014, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,560,873 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
The old "That's different"! "Done right". What's "right". And separate industrial from residential? Why should we do that? Aren't we all supposed to be living in "mixed use" neighborhoods? I lived in a neighborhood with a factory down the street when I was little. My mom used to tie us up to the front porch because of the semis going up and down the street to the mill.



Like any one on this forum is going to be asked their opinion. The interstate highway system is pretty well built out. We're building toll roads here in CO these days.

I'm not a Monday Morning Quarterbacker. I don't like these threads in any forum. I can comment on any thread I wish.
Have you ever walked through Gowanus? The area smells like poop. When people talk about mixed use neighborhoods, they are not talking about building heavy industrial in the middle of a neighborhood. Mixed use typically means mixed residential and commercial or mixed industrial and commercial, rarely does it mean a mix of all three or a mix of residential and industrial.

I don't know what down the street to you means, but it sounds like you lived on a main road.


True, you are free to comment on any thread you like, but if you don't like these "what if" threads, why comment in them just to say you don't like "what if" threads? Seems a bit pointless and can lead a thread off topic.
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Old 01-29-2014, 07:37 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 27 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,030 posts, read 102,689,903 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Have you ever walked through Gowanus? The area smells like poop. When people talk about mixed use neighborhoods, they are not talking about building heavy industrial in the middle of a neighborhood. Mixed use typically means mixed residential and commercial or mixed industrial and commercial, rarely does it mean a mix of all three or a mix of residential and industrial.

I don't know what down the street to you means, but it sounds like you lived on a main road.


True, you are free to comment on any thread you like, but if you don't like these "what if" threads, why comment in them just to say you don't like "what if" threads? Seems a bit pointless and can lead a thread off topic.
We lived on a city street, kind of mid-town. When I have more time, I'll post a picture. Thanks for the tutorial on "mixed use". It seems to mean what someone wants it to mean.
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Old 01-29-2014, 08:40 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,037,172 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post

I'm not a Monday Morning Quarterbacker. I don't like these threads in any forum. I can comment on any thread I wish.
And many do like these threads. You can comment your opinion on any thread you like, saying "I don't like the thread" isn't much of an opinion on the topic itself.
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Old 01-29-2014, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,708,722 times
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I like mixed use, but I'd say heavy industrial should be segregated. But today we have very little of that. Most people/businesses are in the service economy or are doing things without a big impact in their neighbors anywhere. The ideal mixed use combo for me is something like residential, offices (professional services, software development, consulting, dentists), food and retail.
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Old 01-29-2014, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,560,873 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
We lived on a city street, kind of mid-town. When I have more time, I'll post a picture. Thanks for the tutorial on "mixed use". It seems to mean what someone wants it to mean.
Mixed use means mixed use. It doesn't mean all uses, just a mix of residential, commercial, and industrial. Always thought that was self explanatory.
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Old 01-29-2014, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,080 posts, read 16,109,257 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
I like mixed use, but I'd say heavy industrial should be segregated. But today we have very little of that. Most people/businesses are in the service economy or are doing things without a big impact in their neighbors anywhere. The ideal mixed use combo for me is something like residential, offices (professional services, software development, consulting, dentists), food and retail.
Dunno.

I lived across the street from a rather noisy bar once. I'm completely for zoning them out of residential neighborhoods.
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Old 01-29-2014, 02:46 PM
 
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In our town we have a zoning district TC (Town Commercial) It is a combination of Commercial (retail, offices, etc) and Residential. I would consider that mixed use. Some buildings are all commercial, some commercial with apartments above and some pure residential. I think to have mixed use the possible combinations need to be spelled out by zone. Ours is specified in the Municipal code and the comprehensive plan which is reviewed periodically (as called for by State regulation)
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Old 01-29-2014, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Michigan
4,571 posts, read 7,041,891 times
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It's ironic that the US interstate system is "inspired" by German freeways. Really in most European cities, you still can only reach the city center by either surface streets or by train. It seems virtually all freeways in Europe circumvent the city center with maybe a spur or two leading into the center, but never through it. Or at least when they do cut through the city, it's often through an industrial area or lightly developed area. But I highly doubt that they developed freeways to the point of destroying any sort of architecturally significant buildings and neighborhoods to the extent that the US interstate system has.

I always wonder if freeways were built around the periphery of US cities but never through them, would then more emphasis be put on mass transit and limiting cars within the city center? Do people really need freeways to end at their driveways?
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Old 01-29-2014, 03:51 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,037,172 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
It's ironic that the US interstate system is "inspired" by German freeways. Really in most European cities, you still can only reach the city center by either surface streets or by train. It seems virtually all freeways in Europe circumvent the city center with maybe a spur or two leading into the center, but never through it. Or at least when they do cut through the city, it's often through an industrial area or lightly developed area. But I highly doubt that they developed freeways to the point of destroying any sort of architecturally significant buildings and neighborhoods to the extent that the US interstate system has.
Glascow may have an expressway that demolished an old neighborhood:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Glasg...32.07,,0,-8.02

ditto with Leeds:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=leeds...1.19,,0,-10.12

Oslo has an expressway that goes right through the center of the city — but in a tunnel, similar to Boston's big dig:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Oslo,...orway&t=m&z=13

some of the views off the Leeds highway look a bit American.

Note that for many European cities, the length you have to drive from the city center to an expressway isn't that long; maybe only 3 miles, sometimes less.

Quote:
I always wonder if freeways were built around the periphery of US cities but never through them, would then more emphasis be put on mass transit and limiting cars within the city center? Do people really need freeways to end at their driveways?
Might depend on the city. If the center was already healthy and well-used, perhaps transit improvements would have been built instead. If the center was weak and/or decaying, it might just end up being forgetten.

A city like Boston (or rather 1950 Boston) probably would not have gotten two highways crossing through its center if it were any other country besides the US. The same money could have been used to improve its rail connections.
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Old 01-29-2014, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,306,894 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
The old "That's different"! "Done right". What's "right". And separate industrial from residential? Why should we do that? Aren't we all supposed to be living in "mixed use" neighborhoods? I lived in a neighborhood with a factory down the street when I was little. My mom used to tie us up to the front porch because of the semis going up and down the street to the mill.



Like any one on this forum is going to be asked their opinion. The interstate highway system is pretty well built out. We're building toll roads here in CO these days.

I'm not a Monday Morning Quarterbacker. I don't like these threads in any forum. I can comment on any thread I wish.
I personally don't like the toll road thing going on in Denver. They've done some of it in the L.A. area too. The end result seems to be "roads for the rich" or "lanes for the rich". Coloradans seem to not want to raise taxes to widen freeways so they can handle the load. So people continue to sit in bumper to bumper traffic. (I'm talking about C470/I-76, 270, 70 where they've never widened them to handle the volume). So once they're done with the 36 widening out to Boulder, there will be a "toll lane" that will probably cost at least $10 each way, so the other two lanes will still be bumper to bumper. I think they have a similar plan in widening the 70 from downtown to the airport.
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