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Old 02-04-2014, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
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You get the leadership you deserve generally. Once Moses ideas ceased to be popular, he was quickly fired from his position of influence as a NYC bureaucrat.
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Old 02-04-2014, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
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Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
You get the leadership you deserve generally. Once Moses ideas ceased to be popular, he was quickly fired from his position of influence as a NYC bureaucrat.
Very true. He was definitely running the show moreso than he (or anyone) ever should have. The demolition of Penn Station and the World Fair put the nails in his coffin...thankfully.
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Old 02-09-2014, 11:23 PM
bu2
 
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Originally Posted by chet everett View Post
I would hardly call expressways the more destructive things to happen to cities -- ever stopped by ghost towns that were completely bypassed by expresseways? How about race riots? Historic disasters /fires / floods?

I don't think that the cities that I have visted that have a more "fringe loop" type connection to interstate have any better issues with "sprawl" that those that have direct expressways to their core. I do think that cities that have made a commitment to have multilane roads below grade or completely underground can be both visually and functionally superior to those that have such roadways at or worst above grade -- compare the core of Chicago where lower Wacker / Lower Michigan and the multiple tiers of roadways east of Michigan Ave are both more appealing and more functional than the mess of similar connections in downtown Milwaukee where that make it hard to cross streets / blot out the skyline...
Worked pretty well for the Blues Brothers.

Sorry, when I hear lower Wacker I can't help thinking of that movie and its chase scenes.
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Old 02-09-2014, 11:42 PM
bu2
 
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Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
It's not pure poppycock for that reason, however. It's pure poppycock because it was the local metropolitan jurisdictions that wanted the freeway systems they way they were built. In no case was a local metropolitan transportation system overriden. The freeways through cities were built by the city jurisdiction. Yes, with federal funding, but they planned the routes through their jurisdictions.

In hindsight, you could argue that that was bad policy on their part. I'd say it was. It's of course more exciting to pretend it's a national conspiracy rather than just what it is.
I imagine our downtowns would be weaker and there would be more edge cities if it didn't actually run to downtown. Atlanta really doesn't have much inside I-285 ("the Perimteter"). Now 75/85 and 20 do go right to downtown. But the number of freeways inside the Perimeter is pretty limited. And Atlanta is one of the least dense major cities in the country. There are a lot of reasons for that, but not having many freeways in the city contributes to that and contributes to development outside the Perimeter.

In Europe the cities are older and were already pretty dense. In America, most cities become somewhat suburban pretty close to town (i.e. SF houses with a yard). I can't think of one that isn't outside of the northeast except for Chicago and San Francisco.
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Old 02-12-2014, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Richmond/Philadelphia/Brooklyn
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A better Freeway system? Is that some kind of High Speed Rail network???

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Old 02-12-2014, 05:48 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by bu2 View Post

In Europe the cities are older and were already pretty dense. In America, most cities become somewhat suburban pretty close to town (i.e. SF houses with a yard). I can't think of one that isn't outside of the northeast except for Chicago and San Francisco.
However, even the American cities that were older and already pretty dense put more expressways near the city center than elsewhere, especially compared to Europe.

Interestingly, Tokyo, perhaps the least auto-oriented developed world city has expressways in and around the center:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=tokyo...Japan&t=m&z=13

Many are very narrow, only two lanes in each direction.
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Old 02-12-2014, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Originally Posted by pantin23 View Post
A better Freeway system? Is that some kind of High Speed Rail network???
I would love to see the high speed rail line built in the Northwest, it would get so much use from the people in that metro and would be easy to connect it to all of the more populated metros.
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Old 02-12-2014, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
However, even the American cities that were older and already pretty dense put more expressways near the city center than elsewhere, especially compared to Europe.

Interestingly, Tokyo, perhaps the least auto-oriented developed world city has expressways in and around the center:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=tokyo...Japan&t=m&z=13

Many are very narrow, only two lanes in each direction.
Tokyo is just crazy, they took urban development and took it to the extreme. It is just amazing how tight their highway system is working its way through all those urban areas. I couldn't even imagine a highway system like that in the US.
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Old 02-12-2014, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
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Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
I would love to see the high speed rail line built in the Northwest, it would get so much use from the people in that metro and would be easy to connect it to all of the more populated metros.
Much better than the current situation in which bad weather on the other side of the country ties up the plane that you needed to take to travel a couple hundred miles to the next city, and you'll have to wait several days until the backlog of travellers are accommodated. Air traffic congestion isn't getting any better either...
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Old 02-12-2014, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Originally Posted by hurricaneMan1992 View Post
Much better than the current situation in which bad weather on the other side of the country ties up the plane that you needed to take to travel a couple hundred miles to the next city, and you'll have to wait several days until the backlog of travellers are accommodated. Air traffic congestion isn't getting any better either...
That is very true, I didn't even think about that. These regional trips shouldn't need to be done by plane to be done in the roughly the same amount of time as flying.
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